Your Very Next Step newsletter for April 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for April 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“We travel for many reasons: to escape, relax, learn, startle ourselves, sometimes to meet new people, sometimes to get away from familiar ones. But as visitors, we touch only the surface of a place.”

 

– Carl Hoffman

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Ned’s upcoming travel

***  10 Castles You Can Actually Afford to Sleep In

***  40th Annual Mount Rogers Naturalists Rally

***  Wild Edibles and Plants

***  How to Take a Luxury Vacation Without Breaking the Bank

***  Cheap and Chic: 10 Affordable Hawaii Hotels

***  Traverse City woman gives adventure travel a whole new meaning

***  Adventure travel vs. conservation

***  Primal Travel: Alone in Papua

***  Pennsylvania officials urge anglers to prevent wildfires

***  Live Webcast from GOM Ocean Floor

***  Small Town Travel: Four of America’s Most Iconic Trails Converge in Damascus, Virginia

***  Ecologists track D.C. ospreys’ long journey home — from South America to the Anacostia

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

April 2014

Minnesota’s Dinkytown Greenway

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Communications Assistance, Virginia Outdoors Foundation, Williamsburg, VA

2.)  Spring Volunteer Day April 26, Little Buffalo State Park, Newport, PA

3.)  Mounted Assistance Unit (MAU), Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) / Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, Los Angeles, CA

4.)  Volunteer Naturalist, Conservation Commission of Missouri, throughout Missouri

5.)  Arizona Trail – Maintenance – South of Rogers Trough Trailhead, Arizona National Scenic Trail, Arizona Trail Association, Phoenix, AZ

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Ridgerunner- Appalachian Trail CT/MA, Berkshire Trails Program, Appalachian Mountain Club Southern New England Office, South Egremont, MA

2.)  Communications Director, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, Cheyenne, Wyo.

3.)  Mid-Atlantic Corridor Stewardship Coordinator, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Boiling Springs, PA

4.)  Trails Coordinator, Maine Woods Trail Crew, Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands (MBPL) / Plum Creek / Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC), Moosehead Lake Region, Maine

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel, maybe, perhaps:

 

May 11-16, Seattle / Bellingham / Vancouver

 

June 9-10, Abu Dhabi, UAE

 

June 11-12, Bahrain

 

August 18-19-22, Tacoma, Wash.

 

August 22, 23, 24, San Diego, Calif.

 

October 28-29, Nassau, Bahamas

 

***  The Vikings Land at British Museum

http://www.maritime-executive.com/article/The-Vikings-Land-at-British-Museum-2014-03-06/

 

***  10 Castles You Can Actually Afford to Sleep In

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-castles-you-can-actually-afford-to-sleep-in?ref=news_fd_041214

 

***  40th Annual Mount Rogers Naturalists Rally

 

The 40th Annual Mount Rogers Naturalists Rally will be held in Konnarock, VA on Mother’s Day weekend May 9-10, 2014. The many different and overlapping eco-systems of the Mount Rogers area have fascinated scholars and explorers for decades. The event begins with a gathering Friday evening at the Konnarock Community Center-VA 600–for a fried chicken dinner prepared by the Community Association of Konnarock, and a speaker ( this year on pollinators). Field trips depart from the Community Center on Saturday a.m. and p.m. with a wide variety of topics being investigated by participants and the expert trip-leaders. Join us this year to celebrate 40 years of rallying to explore the Mount Rogers biosphere. Go to the mountrogersnaturalistrally.org site for more specifics on the field trips and to reserve your spot for this year’s dinner. Reservations are absolutely, positively necessary as seating is limited.

 

http://mountrogersnaturalistrally.org/

 

***  Wild Edibles and Plants

 

Knowing how to identify what plants you can and can’t eat is one of those skills that may not be essential to modern man, but it can certainly make camping or hiking a little more interesting.

 

http://outdoors.campmor.com/wild-edibles/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=TrailMail-March282014#fbid=OsOFUai_NGF

 

***  How to Take a Luxury Vacation Without Breaking the Bank

 

The Savor Blog

http://blog.savor.co/post/80975536922/how-to-take-a-luxury-vacation-without-breaking-the-bank

 

***  Cheap and Chic: 10 Affordable Hawaii Hotels

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/cheap-and-chic-10-affordable-hawaii-hotels?obref=obinsite#!1-intro

 

***  Traverse City woman gives adventure travel a whole new meaning

 

By Ellen Creager

Detroit Free Press Travel Writer

http://www.freep.com/article/20140330/FEATURES07/303300008/adventure-travel-women-WANT-Pociask

 

(I agree with this comment:  “You can fly to Bora Bora for the same price as flying to Traverse City.”)

 

http://wantexpeditions.com/

 

***  Adventure travel vs. conservation

 

A conversation with outdoor entrepreneur Bill Bryan.

 

High Country News Apr 16, 2014

 

by Ray Ring

 

http://www.hcn.org/issues/46.6/adventure-travel-vs-conservation

http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/city-guides/new-guinea-traveler/

 

***  Primal Travel: Alone in Papua

 

Posted by Keith Bellows of National Geographic Traveler in Travel with Heart on April 14, 2014

 

http://intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com/2014/04/14/primal-travel-alone-in-papua/

 

***  Pennsylvania officials urge anglers to prevent wildfires

 

By Ashley Bennett

 

http://www.gsnmagazine.com/article/40909/pennsylvania_officials_urge_anglers_prevent_wildfi

 

***  Live Webcast from GOM Ocean Floor

 

From April 12-30, members of the public are invited to join NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer as it explores deep-sea habitats in the Gulf of Mexico. Virtual ocean explorers will have the chance to see canyons, deep-sea coral communities, and shipwrecks dating to the early 1800s via live video transmitted from the deep seafloor.

 

http://www.maritime-executive.com/article/Live-Webcast-from-GOM-Ocean-Floor-2014-04-13/

 

***  Small Town Travel: Four of America’s Most Iconic Trails Converge in Damascus, Virginia

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2014/4/7/12523/28596/

 

***  Ecologists track D.C. ospreys’ long journey home — from South America to the Anacostia

 

By Michael E. Ruane

The Washington Post

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/ecologists-track-dc-ospreys-long-journey-home–from-south-america-to-the-anacostia/2014/04/18/78a5dd18-c3fc-11e3-b195-dd0c1174052c_story.htm

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

 

Trail of the Month: April 2014

Minnesota’s Dinkytown Greenway

By Laura Stark

 

“It isn’t the longest bike trail in the city, but it is probably one of the most important,” said Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak, clad in shorts and running shoes on a bright August day last summer before an energetic crowd celebrating the opening of the Dinkytown Greenway.

 

Although only a mile long, the new paved greenway provides a key piece in a biking network that connects the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul. First envisioned 20 years ago, the long-awaited project was eagerly embraced by the community.

 

“I could not believe the size of the turnout,” says Steve Sanders, the University of Minnesota’s alternative transportation manager. “By far, it was the most I’ve ever seen.”

 

Paul Ogren, project manager and engineer for the City of Minneapolis, had the same impression. “I was expecting 50 people, and 250 showed up.”

 

So with virtually no opposition, what took so long?

 

“The Dinkytown Greenway has a long history,” says Sanders. “It was first planned back in 1994, and there’s always been recognition of it as an important piece of infrastructure. But we couldn’t come to an agreement with BNSF Railroad, so the original route had to be changed.”

 

When negotiations with the railroad fell through, Ogren rolled-up his sleeves. With the loss of the potential use of the BNSF corridor for a rail-trail, the route had to be redrawn. But where?

 

“We had to try something entirely different,” Ogren states. “All the neighboring property belonged to the University of Minnesota, so we made a series of designs, even going into the field with a can of spray paint to try and figure out how to fit in a trail.”

 

The University of Minnesota (U of M) was fully supportive of the effort, and the trail now rests entirely on the school’s property. Sanders notes that school administrators were “bound and determined” to make it happen. In particular, he points to the support of Kathleen O’Brien, vice president for university services. “She said, ‘If our stuff is in the way, we’ll move it,'” he affirms.

 

Buildings, loading docks and parking facilities made finding a suitable pathway tricky. “The Dinkytown Greenway has a railroad corridor on one side, and its paving goes right up to the walls of some of the university buildings on the other side,” says Ogren. “It’s shoehorned pretty good.” But, with such a collaborative and cooperative relationship between the City and the University, the trail eventually got done.

 

Critical to the project’s development was funding from the Nonmotorized Transportation Pilot Program (NTPP), a federally funded initiative launched in 2005 that provided $25 million to each of four communities across the country, including Minneapolis, to make biking and walking infrastructure a priority of transportation planning and to measure any resulting changes in transportation behaviors. Rails-to-Trails Conservancy is one of three managing partners and was involved in the program’s design and inception.

 

In Minneapolis, Bike Walk Twin Cities (BWTC) is the local entity for this federal transportation initiative. “The Dinkytown Greenway, long in everyone’s eyes, finally got done thanks to the persistence and funding that came from BWTC,” says Hilary Reeves, communications director for the group. “Funding from the pilot program kicked into reality an incredible expansion of on-street bikeways and trail connections that really make it possible to get anywhere needed on a bike.”

 

Part of the greenway’s new route runs through an old railroad trench, with the Dinkytown commercial district (for which the trail is named) visible 30 feet overhead. A staircase—the slope was too steep to put in a ramp—will be built this year to connect riders in this “Dinkyditch,” with Dinkytown proper up top. The vibrant community (once home to a young Bob Dylan) offers an eclectic mix of stores, restaurants and coffee shops. Different theories swirl about its unusual name, but the most popular one is that it’s named for the small engines—called “dinkys”—that were once a frequent sight in the area’s railroading past.

 

The trail begins near TCF Bank Stadium, home of the Golden Gophers college football team, and continues through the U of M campus on the east bank of the Mississippi River. On the east side of the stadium, a connection can be made to U of M’s Transitway, a three-mile bikeway that connects the school’s Minneapolis and St. Paul campuses.

 

The university has truly embraced bike commuting for its students and employees (the school is one of the top employers in the state). It offers a full-service bike center on campus—just blocks from the Dinkytown Greenway—that has bike parking, bike repair facilities and showers. A dozen bike-sharing Nice Ride stations also dot the campus. According to Sanders, the amenities have made alternative transportation so popular at U of M—bike use has gone up by 40 percent between 2009 and 2013—that the University has actually had to remove car parking to make room for more bike parking.

 

Sanders also notes that new housing is springing up next to the Transitway. “It’s a vibrant place where a lot of redevelopment is happening. They advertise the bikeableness of the area and the fact that you can hop onto this network and go places.”

 

The Dinkytown Greenway is a boon for the Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood, which abuts the university and has a high percentage of renters, largely students, whom Cordelia Pierson, president of the Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association, says are “very interested in biking and walking access throughout the neighborhood and to the Mississippi River.”

 

She adds, “The trail’s name is kind of funny right now because it doesn’t access Dinkytown and it isn’t green.” But both of those issues are soon to change: In addition to the new staircase to access Dinkytown, the neighborhood association is fundraising to plant native prairie grasses, flowers and trees along the trail to bring a sense of vitality to an otherwise utilitarian corridor. Public art and wayfinding signage are also in the works. “We want to help the greenway thrive, so people aren’t just passing through, but want to visit and stay,” she says.

 

The trail’s location adjacent to TCF Bank Stadium may also help bring in some new fans. “The [NFL’s] Vikings are moving to the stadium next to the Dinkytown Greenway,” says Pierson. “For the next two years, while their new stadium is being built, they’ll use this one, so we’re thinking of doing a ‘Biking to the Vikings’ promotion. Getting football fans on bikes can’t be that hard.”

 

Fortuitously, two months before the Purple People Eaters begin playing in August, the METRO light rail system—which welcomes bicyclists with onboard bike racks and station bike lockers—will christen its Green Line that will run through the heart of the U of M campus and include three new stations within a half-mile of the Dinkytown Greenway. This opens up a variety of mixed transit opportunities for residents all over the city, including connections to the famed Mall of America, the Metrodome and the airport on the system’s existing Blue Line.

 

As the trail heads west, it crosses Bridge 9, once used by the Northern Pacific Railroad, but now open for bicyclists and pedestrians. The bridge—a dusky pink of faded U of M maroon—offers spectacular views. Lush tree tops line the Mississippi in vibrant green strokes, while white paddleboats offer splashes of brightness against the dark river.

 

It’s an understandably popular place, especially now that it connects to the Dinkytown Greenway. BWTC, which takes annual biking and walking counts at dozens of locations throughout the Twin Cities, noted in their 2013 report that bicycling on the bridge increased by 53 percent from 2012 to 2013, when the greenway opened.

 

On the river’s west bank, the trail ends at Bluff Street Park, but will be extended under the I-35W Bridge to 13th Avenue South this summer. From there, it’s a short hop to the heavily used bike lanes along 2nd Street that lead to downtown Minneapolis.

 

“The Dinkytown Greenway’s Phase 2 went out to bid, and we wanted to start construction,” says Ogren. “But the weather hasn’t cooperated. We had eight inches of snow three days ago.”

 

In Minneapolis, this is par for the course, but the hardy biking culture is a year-round endeavor. “If you’re a cyclist, these paths are open to ride all winter long,” says Reeves. “You can count on that. They have the same priority as roads.”

 

The cherry on top of the project is that the greenway connects to the Mississippi River Trail, a vast biking route that will one day span the country along America’s most iconic waterway. Minnesota, 1 of 10 states in the network, is in the process of signing its more than 600-mile portion of the route (a mix of on- and off-road segments) from the Iowa border north to the river’s headwaters in Itasca State Park, a project that will be completed by 2015.

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Communications Assistance, Virginia Outdoors Foundation, Williamsburg, VA

 

Assist our communications office with publications and media relations activities, such as writing, photography, and graphic design.

 

Specific Tasks:

•Write article and copy for newsletters, brochures, Web site, and other publications.

•Take photographs on assignment for use in VOF publications.

•Assist with graphic design and conceptualization of VOF publications.

•Conduct interviews for stories and press releases.

•Assist with permissions and fact-checking activities.

 

Qualifications:

•Must have proven skills in writing, photography, or graphic design. Applicants will be asked to submit samples of their work.

•Must be able to project an image, in appearance and character, that reflects positively on VOF and its mission.

•Must be able to effectively convey the mission and message of VOF to the target audience.

•Prior knowledge of VOF’s programs and activities is preferred

 

Training:

•VOF orientation

•On-the-job training

•Experience may substitute for some training

 

Time Commitment:

 

This work can be accomplished on an as-needed basis.

 

http://www.virginiaoutdoorsfoundation.org/volunteer/volunteer-opportunities/communications-assistance/

 

2.)  Spring Volunteer Day April 26, Little Buffalo State Park, Newport, PA

http://www.apps.dcnr.state.pa.us/Calendar/view_event.asp?CalendarID=34687&Location=List

 

3.)  Mounted Assistance Unit (MAU), Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) / Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, Los Angeles, CA

 

The MAU patrols Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) managed parks in the Santa Susana Mountains from Moorpark to Santa Clarita. They also patrol Puente Hills Landfill Native Habitat Preservation Authority owned or managed properties in the cities of Whittier, Hacienda Heights and La Habra Heights in addition to Bosque del Rio Hondo. Members of the unit ride their own horses on trails and fire roads providing visitor services under the supervision of MRCA rangers. Each member is asked to patrol a minimum of 60 hours and attend at least two quarterly meetings per year.

 

http://www.lamountains.com/involved.asp

 

4.)  Volunteer Naturalist, Conservation Commission of Missouri, throughout Missouri

 

Witnessing the wild-eyed excitement of a kid reeling in her first fish and feeling the satisfaction of teaching others to build butterfly gardens are just some of the fun you can experience as a Conservation Department volunteer naturalist. Volunteer naturalists help assure that each visitor to a conservation facility gets the most out of his or her visit. Our comprehensive training program enables volunteer naturalists to lead a wide variety of conservation activities. The program has limited openings and age requirements. The volunteer naturalist position also requires a higher level of commitment, but those who are up to the task will find it very rewarding. For more information contact the volunteer coordinator for the facility at which you would like to volunteer.

http://mdc.mo.gov/about-us/get-involved/mdc-volunteer-programs/become-conservation-volunteer

 

5.)  Arizona Trail – Maintenance – South of Rogers Trough Trailhead, Arizona National Scenic Trail, Arizona Trail Association, Phoenix, AZ

 

Join Arizona Trail Association Segment Steward Craig Gregory and other hardy volunteers as we take revenge on the infamous cats claw on AZT Passage 18b. It isn’t too bad yet but a little work now will save a lot of work later. Tasks include pruning and grubbing out the roots of this particularly nasty bush, as well as some light tread work. RSVP to unlimitedduck@gmail.com for additional details, to reserve your lunch and to let us know if you can drive up the mountain.

 

Contact: Craig Gregory   unlimited_duck@yahoo.com.

 

Offered by: Arizona Trail Association

 

http://www.outdoorvolunteer.org/viewevent.aspx?eventid=891

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Ridgerunner- Appalachian Trail CT/MA, Berkshire Trails Program, Appalachian Mountain Club Southern New England Office, South Egremont, MA

 

Job Dates:  May 19 – August 22, 2014

 

Hiring Timeline:  Applications are accepted on a rolling basis, starting in December.  Interviews are held in January and February.  Final notice is sent out by the end of March.

 

Position Summary

 

AMC Ridgerunners on the Appalachian Trail in Connecticut and the southern part of Massachusetts are a vital part of the management of the trail in these states.  Ridgerunners live on the trail all summer, in ten-day shifts, hiking 8-12 miles per day and camping out at campsites along the way.  Ridgerunners contact over 5,000 trail users annually, informing them of Leave No Trace principles, area regulations and trails, backpacking techniques, AT history, and management practices.  Ridgerunners gather important information such as maintenance concerns and use patterns.  They are the eyes and ears of the AT and the public face of the AMC.

 

Ridgerunners work ten days on with four days off, and weekend work is required.  Duties include backpacking and camping, accurate collection of information including report writing, light trail maintenance, and participation in volunteer trail work parties, among other duties.  The position is from mid-May to late August and is a seasonal, non-exempt, hourly position reporting to the AMC Regional Trails Supervisor.

 

Responsibilities

•Backpack or day hike (depending on assigned route) up to 12 miles per day and camp in specified, designated camping areas for 10 days/nights in a row.

•Interact with as many backcountry visitors as possible, providing trail information and promoting Leave No Trace ethics.

•Lead Leave No Trace Awareness workshops and Leave No Trace Trainer courses for teens, as needed.

•Assist with light trail maintenance including drainage clearing and participating in weekly trail work parties as needed.

•Foster professional relationships with local officials and AMC volunteers.

•Legibly fill out daily reports about trail conditions and backcountry use.

•Pack out litter from backcountry.

•Monitor and maintain backcountry waste management facilities and assist trail work crews.

 

Qualifications

•Extensive backpacking experience, required.

•Solo backpacking experience required

•Willingness to work long hours in solitude, frequently in isolated areas, required.

•Valid driver’s license and reliable transportation, required.

•Wilderness First Aid and CPR or Wilderness First Responder certifications, required (training can be provided prior to the start date at no-cost).

•Excellent communication skills.

•Strong desire and ability to work with the public.

•Ability to work unsupervised, to take initiative, and to work as part of a team.

•Ability to make professional decisions under pressure.

•Physically able to travel safely in the backcountry in all weather conditions carrying up to 50 lbs. of gear.

•Background in environmental sciences, natural resources or education, preferred.

•Strong interest in backcountry management, desirable.

•Knowledge of the Appalachian Trail, helpful.

•High School diploma, GED preferred.

 

Benefits

•AMC Membership

•30% Staff discount on AMC retail products

•4 Free Nights at AMC Huts, Lodges and other facilities while employed

 

Questions and Additional Information:

Alice P. Webber

Southern New England Trails Supervisor

P.O. Box 131

South Egremont, MA 01258

413.528.8003

awebber@outdoors.org

 

To apply, please fill out an online application at http://www.outdoors.org/seasonal or submit a cover letter and resume to awebber@outdoors.org.

 

AMC has zero tolerance for the abuse of children. Any employee with access to children will have a criminal record check performed and have references checked regarding their past work with children.

 

The AMC is an Equal Opportunity Employer, and an Equal Opportunity Service Provider. The AMC values diversity in the workplace.

https://apply.coolworks.com/amc/job-details.asp?JobID=21386

 

***  From Amber Leberman:

 

Hello, Ned,

 

Thanks in advance for your consideration of a job opening at my agency for “Jobs of the Week.” Details below.

 

Amber

 

2.)  Communications Director, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, Cheyenne, Wyo.

 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

Serving as Public Information Officer (PIO) directs and guides public information campaigns and strategies; develops media, marketing and communications plans and strategies to guide overall outreach efforts; works closely with Director’s and Governor’s office, addressing important information and education issues and priorities; serves as a member of Game and Fish Department staff which collectively addresses management issues, polices and overall budget. Working under the Deputy Director of External Operations, supervises the following programs: Conservation Education Services; Recruitment, Retention, and Reactivation of hunters and anglers; Publications; Video Production; Graphic Design; Human Dimensions; Volunteer Program; and Customer Outreach Services.

 

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS:

  • Works closely with Director’s office, other agency administrators and regional personnel coordinating media contact; guides public information campaigns and strategies.
  • Develops media, marketing and communications plans and strategies, guiding agency in its overall outreach efforts; works closely with agency Director’s and Governor’s office to address important information and education issues and priorities (PIO functions).
  • Directs, supervises and delegates supervision to subordinate personnel.
  • Evaluate and report on the effectiveness of communications activities.
  • Hire, evaluate and develop staff to support the achievement of the objective and goals related to communications, media relations, and partner cultivation and events.
  • Works continuously to gain a deep understanding of stakeholder needs.
  • Demonstrates effective oral, written and interpersonal communication skills that keep our clients, partners and colleagues informed and engaged as we operate in a fast-paced and rapidly changing environment.
  • Administers Education functions, including Conservation Education Services, Publications and Customer Outreach Services (Publications, Customer Outreach).
  • Create continuity and clarity in communication across all departments.

 

QUALIFICATIONS:

 

PREFERENCES:

Preference will be given to those with experience or training in communication, marketing, public relations and/ or media relations.

 

Must have a valid drivers license.

 

KNOWLEDGE:

  • The ability to take knowledge and transform into exciting and useful messages, and disseminate it to the right audiences through the best distribution channels.
  • Highly collaborative style; experience developing and implementing communications strategies.
  • Excellent writing/editing and verbal communication skills.
  • Strong track record as an implementer who thrives on managing a variety of key initiatives concurrently.
  • High energy, maturity, and leadership with the ability to serve as a unifying force and to position communications discussions at both the strategic and tactical levels.
  • Self-starter, able to work independently, enjoys creating and implementing new initiatives.
  • Knowledge of public information and media practices; knowledge of marketing principles, brand creation and integrity, and targeted messaging.
  • Knowledge of conservation education programs; knowledge of publication production; knowledge of recruitment and retention principles; knowledge of principles, concepts and current practices of Wyoming State Government, including budget development and management and purchasing.
  • Knowledge of personnel management; knowledge of wildlife management and state wildlife agency operations.
  • Skill in communicating issues to a wide array of professional and lay persons.
  • Skill in oral and written communications; skill in interpersonal relations; skill in fiscal control and budget preparation.
  • Skill in decision-making and directing and delegating work activities; skill in prioritizing allocation of finite personnel and financial resources to meet intra- and inter-departmental needs.
  • Open to and thoughtfully considers the ideas, input, and perspectives of others.
  • Demonstrates flexibility to adapt to changing situations, needs and environments.

 

SALARY: $6,581.00 – $7,742.00 Monthly

http://wgfd.wyo.gov/gameandfishjobs/frmViewJobListings.aspx

 

3.)  Mid-Atlantic Corridor Stewardship Coordinator, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Boiling Springs, PA

 

The Appalachian Trail Conservancy’s mission is to preserve and manage the Appalachian Trail – ensuring that its vast natural beauty and priceless cultural heritage can be shared and enjoyed today, tomorrow, and for centuries to come.

 

CORRIDOR STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM MISSION

The mission of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) Corridor Stewardship Program is to support the Trail Clubs and steward the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (ANST) National Park Service corridor lands (fee lands and easements), which protect the Appalachian Trail corridor and the Trail ‘experience’, through effective implementation of the cooperative management system involving ATC, Trail-maintaining Clubs, and public-agency partners. The Corridor Stewardship Program implements the annual task agreement developed with the National Park Service’s Appalachian Trail Park Office (APPA).

 

POSITION SUMMARY

This position serves as the primary point of contact for all boundary monitoring and maintenance related stewardship actions for the Appalachian National Scenic Trail in the assigned region.  The Corridor Stewardship Program Coordinator facilitates collaboration and cooperation between Trail-maintaining Clubs and public-agency partners to achieve monitoring and management of tracts and boundaries that protect the Appalachian Trail.  This position is responsible for supporting and coordinating regional corridor boundary monitoring and maintenance programs, collecting, organizing and analyzing boundary data, conducting boundary monitoring and maintenance training, conducting and coordinating encroachment mitigation efforts, and supervising seasonal Boundary Technicians. The Coordinator works with other ATC staff, volunteers, the Appalachian Trail Park Office, National Park Service Land Acquisition Office for National Scenic Trails, numerous state agencies, and other entities involved with the Appalachian Trail. The position requires frequent travel and weekend work.

 

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

•In collaboration with program staff and agency partners, establishes a structured, systematic program of boundary monitoring and maintenance that will facilitate perpetual protection of Appalachian National Scenic Trail tracts and boundary lines

•Responsible for planning and managing program budget, implementing annual task agreement, purchasing supplies, and maintaining tools and equipment.

•Aggregates, organizes, maintains, and analyzes boundary data to develop work projects for supporting and coordinating boundary monitoring and maintenance activities

•In collaboration with program staff and agency partners, develops and revises standard operating procedures and protocols that contribute to program operations and standardization of methodology

•Facilitates communication and cooperation with Trail-maintaining Clubs and agency partners

•Coordinates boundary monitoring and maintenance projects with Trail Clubs.

•Maintains computerized data management systems which manage boundary data and information and produce reports in collaboration with program and agency partners.

•Compiles monthly and annual summaries of regional program accomplishments to be presented to ATC senior staff and agency partners

•Reinforces, sustains, and acts as the ATC proponent for regional Trail Club corridor stewardship programs

•Responsible for collaboratively developing and presenting standardized training methodology, materials, and learning opportunities to regional Trail Clubs, volunteers, staff, and agency partners

•Responds to, manages, and mitigates reported threatened or actual corridor and boundary violations/ encroachments in accordance with established standard operating procedures

•May assist Trail Clubs with episodic crew recruitment, training, and management for boundary monitoring and maintenance projects

•Supervises seasonal Boundary Technicians; includes administrative duties related to supervisory responsibilities

•Other duties as assigned

 

QUALIFICATIONS

•BA/BS degree. Degree in conservation biology, ecology, forestry, natural resources management, engineering, surveying, or outdoor resource related field preferred.

•Creativity and attention to detail while handling multiple tasks and meeting assigned deadlines

•Ability to solve problems and handle issues of a complicated / complex nature

•Skilled in project management and contract oversight.

•Familiarity with the Appalachian Trail or other trail work experience is desirable

•Strong communication skills, ability to maintain favorable relations, and inspire cooperation with volunteers

•Supervisory and project planning and implementation experience is required

•Ability to develop and present training programs with a variety of media.

•Experience living and working outdoors, including primitive, backcountry camping

•Demonstrated proficiency with map and compass, survey plats, and orienteering

•Ability to interpret and work with maps/plans oriented towards natural resources, land use, development, or engineering/construction

•Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, Google applications and GIS

•Must be willing and able to work flexible schedule including weekends

 

PHYSICAL DEMANDS AND WORK ENVIRONMENT

•Work environment is in a multi-person office situation with moderate noise

•Regular use of a computer is required; Microsoft Office, ESRI GIS, and Google applications are used

•Frequent travel and weekend work is required

•Requires Wilderness First Responder and CPR Training; can be obtained post-hire minimum WFA at hire

•Requires valid state driver’s license with a safe driving record,

•Incumbent will be exposed to hazardous physical conditions and seasonal exposure to extreme weather conditions, including rain, snow, humidity, intense heat, and sunlight

•Incumbent must be able to handle heavy brush, walk for extended periods, stand for long periods, perform routine moderate lifting, and to carry up to 50 pounds in a backpack over a minimum of three miles, traverse rough uneven terrain, and wet and slippery surfaces.

 

TO APPLY

 

The deadline to apply is May 2, 2014. To apply please email a cover letter, resume, and three references to lbresette@appalachiantrail.org.   All resumes should be titled as “Last Name_First Name.”  Please include the position title and your name in the email subject line.  An example subject line will read: “Mid-Atlantic Corridor Stewardship Coordinator: Joan Smith.”

 

http://www.appalachiantrail.org/who-we-are/job-opportunities/mid-atlantic-corridor-stewardship-coordinator

 

4.)  Trails Coordinator, Maine Woods Trail Crew, Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands (MBPL) / Plum Creek / Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC), Moosehead Lake Region, Maine

https://apply.coolworks.com/amc/job-details.asp?JobID=39403

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2014 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

 

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Your Very Next Step newsletter for April 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for April 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“If you are seeking creative ideas, go out walking.  Angels whisper to a man when he goes for a walk.”

– Raymond Inmon

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 591 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Do you know what size pack you need for your next trip?

***  ‘Pay only for what you weigh’!

***  8 things never to do in a hotel

***  The 10 Best BBQ Joints in America

***  The Top 10 Airport Lounges

***  10 Big Travel Adventures For 2013

***  Adventure Travel Trends To Watch In 2013

***  How To Drive In India (And Not Die)

***  Golden smiles on the road to Uzbekistan

***  Best Adventure Travel Companies {On Earth}

***  8 things never to do in a hotel

***  The 10 Best BBQ Joints in America

***  The Top 10 Airport Lounges

***  Best Adventure Vacations in the USA

***  Plan Next Year’s Antarctic Cruise Now

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: April 2013
Michigan’s Hart-Montague Trail State Park

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Visitor Service Hosts, Malad Gorge State Park, South Central Idaho, W. of Twin Falls Hagerman, ID

2.)  Kanopolis Lake-Park Host, Water Safety, Kanopolis Lake, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Marquette, KS

3.)  Volunteer Clearinghouse volunteer. Park Maintenance, Perry Lake, Perry, KS

4.) Event Support Staff, Morrison Knudsen Nature Center, Boise, ID

5.)  Conservation Volunteers, ACE Volunteer Vacations, American Conservation Experience, Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Bryant Park Games Attendant – Outdoor Ping Pong Court & Games Area, City of New York, NY, NY

2.)  Marketing Manager, Lindblad Expeditions, New York, New York

3.)  Outreach and Marketing Coordinator, Outward Bound California, San Francisco, CA

4.)  Creel Clerk, State of Montana, Helena, MT

5.)  President and Chief Executive Officer, U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance, Columbus, OH

6.)  Director of Corporate Communication, THE VIRGINIA TOURISM CORPORATION, Richmond, VA

7.)  Fly Fishing Guide, Teton Valley Lodge, Pocatello, ID

8.)  Crew member, Bridging Cultures Conservation Corps (BCCC), Montana Conservation Corps, National Forest locations in Montana

9.)  VP of Marketing & Communications, Trout Unlimited, Arlington, VA

10.)  Sports Tourism Coordinator (Senior Recreation Coordinator), Department of Recreation and Parks, County of Henrico, Henrico, VA

11.)  Southeast Travel Editor & Brand Manager, VisitSouth, Gulf Shores, AL

12.)  Global Air Services Coordinator, G Adventure, Toronto, Canada

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  The Backpack Cheat Sheet

Do you know what size pack you need for your next trip?

http://outdoors.campmor.com/the-backpack-cheat-sheet/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=TrailMail-April52013&cm_pla=50929

 

***  Samoa Air, Introducing a world first:

 

‘Pay only for what you weigh’!

 

We at Samoa Air (http://www.samoaair.ws/) are keeping airfares fair, by charging our passengers only for what they weigh. You are the master of your Air’fair’, you decide how much (or little) your ticket will cost. No more exorbitant excess baggage fees, or being charged for baggage you may not carry. Your weight plus your baggage items, is what you pay for. Simple.

 

The Sky’s the Limit!

 

If you are like Ned, and feel this policy discriminates against Samoans, it would be because, according to wikianswers (http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_average_height_of_Samoan_men) “Average height of Samoans and Polynesians in general raised on the islands is 5 feet 10 inches. Those raised outside the island of origin remains average but large numbers are well over the 6 feet range.

 

Without arguement they are potentially the largest peoples on earth, since european contact there physiques have always been documented as being large and muscular and this has not changed since.

 

A study is being conducted by Bringham Young University Hawaii and Maryland for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures, as polynesians particularly Samoan, Tongan and Fijian peoples have much denser muscle and bone tissue compared to other peoples.

 

As these peoples have the lowest numbers of Osteoporosis and bone related debilitations of ther sort.

 

Thier unique genetics afford them great physical advantages which is the cause of many scientific research and curiosity.

 

***  10 Big Travel Adventures For 2013

 

http://www.gadling.com/2013/01/03/10-big-travel-adventures-for-2013/

 

***  Adventure Travel Trends To Watch In 2013

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tamar-lowell/adventure-travel-trends_b_2240890.html

 

***  How To Drive In India (And Not Die)

http://www.gadling.com/2013/04/04/how-to-drive-in-india-and-not-die/

 

***  Golden smiles on the road to Uzbekistan

http://www.guardian.co.uk/travel/2013/mar/01/uzbekistan-holiday-road-trip

 

***  Best Adventure Travel Companies {On Earth}

 

Adventure Travel Companies Rated!

 

The Adventure Ratings For the second time, we’ve conducted an unprecedented survey of adventure travel companies, based on the idea that a traveler’s most important decision is not always where to go but who to go with. For this edition, we spoke to more guide services—and their clients—than ever before.

 

http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/outfitterhome

 

***  8 things never to do in a hotel

http://www.usatoday.com/media/cinematic/video/2019057/

 

***  The 10 Best BBQ Joints in America

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/The-10-Best-BBQ-Joints-in-America/?cid=eltrTop10

 

(I would say this might be open for discussion.)

 

***  The Top 10 Airport Lounges

 

By Kate Mulcrone

 

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Looking to ease the pain of your next 4-hour layover? Departures has rounded up the 10 best airport lounges in the world. We’ve also included some stories to help you plan in each destination.

 

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/The-Top-10-Airport-Lounges/?cid=eltrTop10

 

***  Best Adventure Vacations in the USA

 

“Vacation” doesn’t always translate into a poolside cabana or a Broadway show. For some, escaping the daily grind means getting your adrenalin pumping; like on a rugged mountainside or 50 feet below the ocean surface. Others search for snowy peaks and alpine lakes simply for a change of scenery. This list highlights some of America’s most exciting spots for a thrilling walk on the wild side.

 

(Ned Notes:  There are only two places on this list that I have not been to.)

 

http://travel.usnews.com/Rankings/Best_Adventure_Vacations_in_the_USA/

 

***  Plan Next Year’s Antarctic Cruise Now

http://www.fodors.com/news/antarctica-cruise-planning-tips-6402.html

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: April 2013
Michigan’s Hart-Montague Trail State Park
By Laura Stark

“People were apprehensive. But, after they see what happens, you can’t build it fast enough.”

The rural flavor of western Michigan’s Hart-Montague Trail State Park is palpable. Cherries, peaches and apples hang heavy from the trees. The lacy green leaves of the Asparagus Capital of the World’s prized vegetable flutter in messy rows along the trail. Dairy cows placidly watch bicycles whir by and, in the summertime, the small town farmers markets offer a friendly bustle of activity.

“It’s so purely ‘west Michigan,'” says Nancy Krupiarz, director of the Michigan Trails and Greenways Alliance. “When you think of Michigan, with its orchards and fresh fruit, Lake Michigan, the farms, the small towns, this trail encapsulates it all.”

Fittingly, the story of this 22-mile rail-trail begins with an aptly-named farmer: Bill Field. Legislation to rename the trail after him passed the Michigan Senate unanimously this past March and now awaits a House vote.

“Mr. Field was instrumental in the creation of the Hart-Montague Trail State Park,” says Michigan State Senator Goeff Hansen (R-Hart.), who sponsored the bill. “After the rail service in Oceana County ended in 1981, Mr. Field had the vision to turn it into a recreational trail for the community and the state.”

That task, at one point labeled “Field’s Folly,” was not easy. Field, a fruit farmer from Shelby, became an Oceana County commissioner in the early 1980s. A close friend described him as being 6’6″ with a big booming voice and a presence that was always known in a room. After being inspired by a visit to the Elroy-Sparta State Trail in Wisconsin a few years earlier, he presented an idea for developing a trail through the abandoned railroad corridor that stretched from Hart to Montague, tracks that he grew up around.

“When rail service was discontinued and the salvage work was being done, I thought there should be some recreational use for that old railroad,” says Joel Mikkelsen, the former chairman of the Oceana County Parks and Recreation Commission, and a long-time friend of Field. “In January 1983, I read an article in the local paper that the newly elected county commissioner [Bill Field] wanted to make it into a bike trail. I lived two miles down the road from him, so I called him up and he came over 15 minutes later.”

When Field received no support from his fellow county officials for the rail-trail project, he took matters into his own hands, buying the property himself and donating the land, valued at $225,000, to the state. Field and Mikkelsen continued to work together for years building support for the rail-trail in the surrounding communities.

“People didn’t want it at first,” says Paul Yauk, linear trails program manager for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. “People were apprehensive. But, after they see what happens, you can’t build it fast enough.”

Field’s tireless efforts to realize the vision for the trail earned him the title of Michiganian of the Year by The Detroit News in 1988. The trail’s inaugural section, built by the City of Hart in 1989, stretched 11 miles south from Hart, becoming the first rail-trail with a paved surface in the state that is now number one in the nation for open rail-trail miles. (Paint Creek Trail in southeastern Michigan beat it as the very first rail-trail in the state by just a few years).

The City of Montague opened the second half of the trail in 1991, completing the project. The refurbished Whitehall-Montague Train Depot at this southern end serves as a visitors center and an adjacent caboose includes exhibits and artifacts from the railroad’s heyday. The line was originally part of the Chicago and West Michigan Railroad, built in 1872 to service the lumber mills between Muskegon and Pentwater. A side trail along White Lake leads to another museum, the White River Light Station, a beautiful brick lighthouse built in 1875.

Going north from there, the Hart-Montague Trail runs through the towns of Rothbury, New Era, Shelby and Mears, and ends in Hart. “What’s interesting is there are lots of nice towns along the way,” says Yauk. “So there are short stops. You can go town-to-town, relax, and take advantage of what they offer. The towns along the way have really embraced the trail. It’s a big draw for the region.”

“Any kind of business that offers trail-user needs—restaurants, pharmacies, gift shops, camping, hotels—they all benefit because it gives people another reason to stay in the area,” says Krupiarz. “There are lots of attractions in the area and the trail takes a whole other day. A lot of people will stay just to get that experience.”

About mid-trail, New Era has one not-to-miss stop: Country Dairy, an ice cream shop offering funky homemade flavors like Hoofprints and Udder Nutsense. Visitors can pet calves, watch cows being milked, tour the bottling plant and learn all they ever wanted to know about dairy farming at the company’s Moo School. For more culinary pleasures, the town’s Trailside Restaurant, known for its roast turkey, mashed potatoes and homemade gravy, is the type of place where you can grab a blue-plate lunch special for less than the cost of a big-city grande latte.

In Montague’s Ellenwood Park (across the street from the trail), the world’s largest weathervane at 48 feet tall is visible for miles. At its top sits a replica of the Ella Ellenwood, a schooner that ran aground in Lake Michigan in 1901. The trail parallels Great Lake, and is never more than a few miles from its eastern shore. Lined with soft, sandy beaches, the region is known as the country’s Third Coast. About five miles west of the trail’s northern end, Silver Lake State Park on Lake Michigan is worth a side trip. The massive sand dunes in the 2,000-acre park cover what was once a white pine forest used by the area’s burgeoning lumber industry in the 1800s. Beachcombers frequently find “petrified lightning” here, natural glass tubes formed when lightening strikes and melts the sand.

With its many attractions, the trail is well-loved and well-used. “Families are embracing the trail and outdoor recreation,” says Amy VanLoon, executive director of the White Lake Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau. “Families come in droves with bikes.”

It is hoped that repaving work will begin next year along the entire route, and the trail’s width will also be expanded. Mikkelsen, who recently retired and does maintenance on the trail (“for fishing trip money”), says his favorite thing about the trail is how positively people react to it. “Even though it has bumps and cracks and needs repaving badly, trail users are always complimentary,” he says. “When I’m out leaf-blowing or mowing along the trail, I get a lot of thumbs-ups as the bicyclists go by.”

Long-range plans call for hooking the trail into a network that will reach all the way to Grand Rapids, the state’s second largest city. Through a series of connections from the Hart-Montague Trail’s southern end—from White Lake Pathway to the Fred Meijer Berry Junction Trail to the Musketawa Trail—that goal is almost attainable now. Only 10 miles lie between the southern end of the Musketawa Trail and the city.

Although Field passed away in 2005, the growing legacy of the rail-trail—his field of dreams—remains for generations. If Field were alive today, Mikkelsen says, “He would still be out there enjoying it.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Visitor Service Hosts, Malad Gorge State Park, South Central Idaho, W. of Twin Falls Hagerman, ID

http://www.volunteer.gov/gov/results.cfm?Agency=IDPR

 

2.)  Kanopolis Lake-Park Host, Water Safety, Kanopolis Lake, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Marquette, KS

 

Park Host/Water Safety – May 01, 2013 to September 30, 2013. Park Host will have duties with visitor assistance and water safety. Duties include assisting campers by providing lake information and distributing Title 36, Lake Maps, and Water Safety Material. Volunteer(s) may also staff the Visitor Center during peak hours and provide information to visitors in person and over the phone. Volunteer(s) will update/maintain the existing bulletin boards by adding new material and making minor structural repairs. The volunteer(s) will also perform courtesy vessel inspections at boat ramps and assist the Ranger staff with on the water vessel inspections. Volunteers will take photographs of visitors and wildlife, and may be asked by the staff to assist with various light duty tasks.

 

Volunteer Clearinghouse volunteer.clearinghouse@usace.army.mil 800.865.8337

http://www.volunteer.gov/gov/results.cfm?states=KS

 

3.)  Volunteer Clearinghouse volunteer. Park Maintenance, Perry Lake, Perry, KS

http://www.volunteer.gov/gov/results.cfm?states=KS

 

4.) Event Support Staff, Morrison Knudsen Nature Center, Boise, ID

 

The Nature Center needs volunteers with a variety of talents to provide educational events for the public. Some of our events are labor-intensive and rerequre varying degrees of assistance with set up and break-down, customer service, educational activities and photographic documentation.

 

Please contact Dave Cannamela at 287-2902, 890-1319 or david.cannamela@idfg.idaho.gov

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/education/?getPage=235

 

5.)  Conservation Volunteers, ACE Volunteer Vacations, American Conservation Experience, Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

http://www.usaconservation.org/vacations/vacations/bryce.html

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

***  From Phil Cogan:

 

1.)  Bryant Park Games Attendant – Outdoor Ping Pong Court & Games Area, City of New York, NY, NY

 

The Bryant Park (City of New York) management group seeks part-time staff for the Outdoor Ping Pong Court and Games Area.

Qualifications:

BA preferred – consideration given to undergraduate work plus experience in recreation, coaching or park management

• Strong communication and interpersonal skills

• Willingness and desire to get hands dirty

• Outgoing, fun, curious, mature, positive, and a self-starter

• Experience in customer service

• Responsible and detail-oriented with excellent analytical skills

Duties

Act as a host for the Park, and keep visitors happy

• Maintain ping pong and park equipment

• Facilitate games, and manage time limits

• Record the number of visitors

• Assist management with special events or tournaments

• Opening and closing of game area on a daily basis

• Daily maintenance (cleaning) of Ping Pong Court, games area, and equipment

• Take direction from management staff regarding special assignments

• Ability to work evenings and weekends as needed

• Ability to work outside

Position runs from April to November. To apply, please email resume and cover letter. Please put “Bryant Park Games Attendant” in the subject line.

$10 per hour with possible increase to $12 per hour, pending good job performance

How to apply

To apply, please email resume and cover letter. Please put “Bryant Park Games Attendant” in the subject line.

isteichen@urbanmgt.com

 

2.)  Marketing Manager, Lindblad Expeditions, New York, New York

 

We are currently recruiting for a full-time Marketing Manager in our New York City office. As part of a team devoted to a core product of Lindblad Expeditions, the Marketing Manager is responsible for marketing planning and tactical execution of marketing initiatives and strategies designed to meet and exceed the revenue goals of the organization. A creative thinker with strong organizational skills, the Marketing Manager will succeed by combining a strong sense of strategic perspective with a strong tactical “can do” execution.

 

ESSENTIAL DUTIES

 

• Working with the product managers, develop and execute marketing and sales plans to support the specific products assigned from the company product line.

• Prepare written briefs for, and plan/manage, all direct customer communication designed to generate revenue for the specific products assigned.

• Work with the Director Research/Analysis (Database Master) to identify the best prospects for each direct communication.

• Keep product team and senior management aware of competitive developments within the market place.

• Work with Marketing Services to develop and produce compelling advertising, direct mail and online communication vehicles in support of meeting overall revenue objectives. Monitor work progress to insure planned communication schedule is met. Review/approve all final communication prior to its release.

• Work with travel agent and group sales to determine revenue goals for each channel of each product line. Monitor performance toward revenue objectives.

• Evaluate progress of bookings for the specific products assigned. Identify overall or channel shortfall areas. Collaborate with product and marketing teams to provide actions to address shortfall.

• Evaluate and interpret key reports to assess overall, and by channel, return on investment for each specific product assigned.

• Provide recommendations to product and senior management with regard to increased effectiveness and efficiency of the marketing spend.

 

QUALIFICATIONS

 

• Bachelor’s Degree. MBA a plus.

• 5 years product marketing experience. Travel industry background preferred but not required.

• Passion for values-led marketing and corporate social responsibility.

• Excellent written and verbal communication skills.

• Polished presentation skills.

• Demonstrated experience in developing product marketing plans, managing those plans, and producing forecasted revenue results.

• Highly organized with excellent attention to detail.

• Ability to manage multiple projects in a deadline driven environment while producing high quality work that gets results.

• Strong quantitative skills.

• Demonstrated commitment to teamwork with creativity, flexibility, tenacity, good humor and a high level of energy.

• Proficient with MS Office–PowerPoint, Excel.

• Positive attitude.

• Respect for others.

• High degree of honesty and integrity.

• Sense of Humor.

 

DISCLAIMER STATEMENT

This job description is intended only to describe the general nature and level of work being performed by an incumbent in this position. It is not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities, duties, and skills or abilities required of persons so classified or assigned.

 

http://www.talentzoo.com/job/Marketing-Manager/141352.html

 

3.)  Outreach and Marketing Coordinator, Outward Bound California, San Francisco, CA

 

Position Overview

 

The Outreach and Marketing Coordinator supports the growth of programs with the community – individuals, schools, school districts and youth serving organizations. This position is the primary forward-facing liaison with potential community partners and is responsible for marketing, promoting, scheduling and coordinating details for OBCA courses. This position will require in depth study of local school districts, charter schools and independent schools as well as the community-based non-profit sector that will result in a growth in program contracts. Additionally, this position will support the administrative functions of our programs, always focused on how we better serve our clients and community from and administrative perspective.

 

About OBCA

 

Outward Bound California (OBCA) delivers educational experiences that help people develop confidence and character through challenges and discovery in the wilderness, in cities, and in schools. OBCA operates urban programs through the Bay Area Center, located in San Francisco, extended summer wilderness courses in the Sierra Nevada Mountains near Yosemite, and winter and spring courses in Joshua Tree.

 

Essential Duties and Responsibilities

 

1. Community Outreach and Sales

•Develop and expand upon current and new partner relationships.

•Recruit participants for all OBCA’s grant-funded and fee-based courses to meet enrollment targets.

•Assess, communicate, and develop potential partners and clients to identify programmatic opportunities. Conduct direct mail, trade show exhibition, in-person and email-based sales activities.

•Develop communication tools, collateral, and program packets, and communication strategies. Follow up activities for participant and partner recruitment and retention.

•Help raise awareness of programmatic opportunities by managing social media, website updates, advertising strategy, and e-Newsletters.

•Plan, coordinate and execute outreach and marketing activities and event with program staff and student ambassadors.

•Advocate for the teachers/educators, our primary client contacts with program staff and Board of Directors regarding how we can best support their schools and organizations.

 

2. Program & Administrative Support

•Set up, manage, and track sales in CRM database.

•Develop and implement overall customer satisfaction through customer feedback forums and ongoing engagement with schools, parents and alumni.

•Communicate partner and client goals, objectives, and concerns to program staff.

•Establish and uphold timely enrollment for all scheduled program bookings.

•Plan post program, follow-up activities, evaluations, projects and events. Coordinate informational meetings with partners and clients.

•Ensure administer in of all program related paperwork and financial transactions, such as program agreements, student evaluations, medicals, and invoicing.

•Ensure effective contract and enrollment processes for schools and community partners, coordinating any specific course design/curriculum link.

•Assist in creating annual program schedule.

 

3. Business/Client Management

•Maintain detailed budget records for all contracted courses and programs. Coordinate with Office Manager to ensure proper invoicing and payments.

•Update and maintain the database for all program and financial details, contracts and client communication.

•Support grant writing and marketing strategies by gathering pertinent client information, feedback, and program reports.

•Manage and report final enrollment and revenue statistics.

 

Secondary Duties and Responsibilities

•Coordinate promotional mailings.

•Manage volunteers and office interns as needed.

•Assist the admission and medical screening as needed.

•Participate in other duties as assigned.

 

Knowledge and Skills

•Strong work ethic and initiative.

•Knowledge of OB programs and philosophy.

•Solid interpersonal skills. Ability to work both independently and cooperatively as a team member.

•Detail oriented with good organizational skills.

•Ability to prioritize and work on multiple projects simultaneously.

•Ability to relate to diverse communities, staff and clients.

•Excellent time management and ability to meet deadlines.

•Very strong and effective communicator, both written and oral.

•Proficient with PC in Word® and Excel®.

•Proficient with Adobe Creative Suite

•Salesforce CRM experience preferred.

 

Education and Work Experience

•Bachelor’s Degree and 1-3 years’ experience in professional outreach and sales and/or development experience.

•Experience in Outward Bound, the outdoor education/experiential learning field or similar.

 

Location

•Position based at Outward Bound California Regional Office, San Francisco, CA.

•Frequent travel, irregular and long hours are expected and may be required.

•Ability to lift and move a minimum of 40 pounds.

 

Compensation

•Full-time, salaried position with benefits.

•Salary commensurate with experience within the start range of $36,000 to $45,000.

 

Outward Bound California is committed to equal opportunity for its employment, without discrimination on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex or sexual orientation, age, religion, disability, marital or parental status, status with respect for public assistance or veteran’s status.

 

How to apply

 

•Submit thoughtful cover letter, resume with three references, and a writing sample no longer than 1,000 words (blog posts, links, and/or sample flyers are encouraged). No phone calls please.

 

•Apply at www.outwardboundcalifornia.org (click “Employment”) before April 14, 2013 to be considered for the first review. Position will remain open until filled. Ideal starting day is May 3.

http://www.idealist.org/view/job/3ch9wDH7SM3p/

 

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

4.)  Creel Clerk, State of Montana, Helena, MT

http://1.usa.gov/10kbezf

 

5.)  President and Chief Executive Officer, U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance, Columbus, OH

http://bit.ly/10kbBd1

 

6.)  Director of Corporate Communication, THE VIRGINIA TOURISM CORPORATION, Richmond, VA

http://bit.ly/16PHi0p

 

7.)  Fly Fishing Guide, Teton Valley Lodge, Pocatello, ID

 

Job Description: Our fly fishing guides are required to provide their own 4 wheel drive vehicle, drift boat, trailer and other necessary items for fishing.  We guide on the South Fork, Teton and Henry’s fork rivers in Idaho.  Guides are on the water for 8 to 9 hours per day from Memorial Day to Columbus Day. Guides must be highly knowledgeable about fly fishing.

Desired Skills & Experience: Fly fishing, fly tying, rowing, customer service, first aid, CPR

http://linkd.in/12hgB25

 

8.)  Crew member, Bridging Cultures Conservation Corps (BCCC), Montana Conservation Corps, National Forest locations in Montana

 

As a Bridging Cultures Conservation Corps (BCCC) crew member, your home is a tent for much of the time, and meals are shared around camp with fellow crew members. You’ll work alongside crew members from across the region who share your passion for hard work and the outdoors. A special emphasis of this program is bringing people together from diverse cultures, to learn more not only about natural resource management but also how Native American traditional knowledge, culture and heritage are important components of caring for the land.

 

Throughout the 4-month field program you’ll work in a wide range of National Forest locations in Montana and gain exposure to a variety of natural resource subjects, including silviculture, range, wildlife, fisheries, recreation and restoration management. Separate from the field program, you’ll be able to partner with a representative of the U.S. Forest Service to explore in depth a natural or cultural resource program area of your choosing.  As part of this program, indigenous culture and heritage will be woven throughout the field program and the history and current relationship between the U.S. Forest Service and Tribal Nations will be explored. The final hitch will include guidance on how to apply for jobs with non-competitive eligibility status with the U.S. Forest Service.

 

Serving as a crew member is not easy; you will be away from home much of the time, waking up early and working long hours to complete rigorous and demanding projects, in all the elements that the wilds of Montana can throw at you. You will have sore muscles, sunburns, and conflicts within your crew. But the rewards are great; upon the completion of your term you will find yourself with an enhanced skill set that you never dreamed possible. You’ll discover unexpected abilities in yourself along with an enduring self-confidence that will transfer to all of your future endeavors. You will have acquired marketable professional skills, an AmeriCorps Education Award, and a sense of community; all of which create limitless possibilities for your life after MCC. You’ll look back at your season with an earned sense of pride, knowing that you accomplished more than you ever thought possible.

Come join us this summer!

 

We provide reasonable accommodations for qualified individuals and are an equal opportunity employer.

 

Benefits

 

Bridging Cultures Conservation Corps members receive a $504 bi-weekly living allowance, training, and may qualify for health insurance after 30 days. Upon successful completion of the term of service, members are eligible to receive an AmeriCorps Education Award of $1,468.

 

Qualifications – Must Have

 

Willingness to serve long hours and live and work outdoors in all weather conditions.

Desire to learn new skills, including group communication skills.

Ability to lift up to 20 lbs. repeatedly and use hand tools.

Ability to hike up to 12 miles per day in rugged terrain, often carrying a heavy backpack and tools.

High school diploma, GED, or readiness to take the GED

US Citizenship.

 

http://mtcorps.org/join/americorps/bridging-cultures-conservation-corps

 

9.)  VP of Marketing & Communications, Trout Unlimited, Arlington, VA

 

About Trout Unlimited

Today, Trout Unlimited is a national organization with more than 150,000 volunteers organized into about 400 chapters nationwide. This dedicated grassroots army is matched by a respected staff of organizers, lawyers, policy experts and scientists, who work out of more than 30 offices. Our mission is to conserve, protect and restore North America’s cold-water fisheries and their watersheds.

 

Position Summary

This is an exciting opportunity to join Trout Unlimited preferably in their headquarters in Arlington, Virginia – as the Vice President of Marketing & Communications.  The VP of Marketing & Communications will report directly to the CEO and is member of the Senior Staff.  The VP of Marketing & Communications will be responsible for the execution of Trout Unlimited’s communications, marketing and branding strategies. The VP of Marketing & Communications will oversee all activities that promote, enhance, and protect the organization’s brand reputation and identify communication goals. A key objective is to manage the development and production of Trout’s varied and integrated communications activities and tools including: supporting all events and initiatives, direct mail and marketing, newsletters and other print publications; Website content, E-news and other online communications, social and conventional media and public relations, and marketing.

 

Duties and Responsibilities

– Manage the development and production of all Trout Unlimited’s communications tools, with a particular emphasis on online communications and tools such as social media.

– Experience in deploying community building web sites is important.

– Manage production of all marketing and promotional materials.

– Increase membership acquisition program.

– Increase Trout’s online community activity.

– Improve internal processes to improve implementation of the communications strategy.

– Expand partnerships within the outdoor, and related, industry.

 

Job Requirements

Qualifications

– 10 years of relevant professional experience.

– Excellent written and oral communication skills. Demonstrated versatility in writing for all media platforms

– Creative and strategic application of digital and social media technologies.

– Experience in planning, writing, editing, and production of newsletters, press releases, annual reports, marketing literature, and other print publications.

– Innovative thinker, with a track record for problem solving and developing action plans and managing output.

– Self-reliant, results oriented, and strong interpersonal skills with the ability to engage and collaborate and develop consensus with staff and colleagues.

– Experience managing a diverse and remote staff.

– Ability to make decisions in a changing environment and anticipate future needs.

– Background in policy and advocacy communications a plus.

– Passion for Trout Unlimited’s mission is essential.

– A professional and resourceful style; flexible and adaptable style; a leader who can positively impact both strategic and tactical communication initiatives.

– Ability to work with grassroots leaders and volunteers.

– Ability to work both independently without close oversight, but also a team player who will productively engage with others at varying levels of seniority within and outside of TU.

– Previous experience in conservation organization or the outdoor industry is helpful.

– Strong organizational and time management skills with exceptional attention to detail.

– Excellent computer skills including Microsoft Office Suite products.

How to Apply

– Please send a letter of interest, resume and 3 professional references to Vivie Yen at vyen@tu.org by April 30, 2013. No phone calls please.

– In subject line please reference the PRSA Jobcenter

 

This is not an all-inclusive list of duties and responsibilities.

 

TU is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes a diverse pool of candidates in this search.  TU hires staff without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, age, gender, sexual orientation, marital status or disability.

 

http://jobs.prnewsonline.com/jobseeker/job/12953830/

 

10.)  Sports Tourism Coordinator (Senior Recreation Coordinator), Department of Recreation and Parks, County of Henrico, Henrico, VA

 

Henrico County, a progressive employer of choice, provides job seekers with the promise of fair and competitive compensation; a close-knit atmosphere with low employee turnover; and a benefits package that helps secure financial stability.

 

Established in 1611, Henrico County has deep historical roots.  Henrico County borders the City of Richmond to the west, north and east and constitutes approximately a third of the Richmond metropolitan areas.  Henrico County is among the top-rated counties in the nation and was one of the first localities to adopt the County Manager Form of Government.  Citizens of Henrico County are represented by an elected Board of Supervisors representing five magisterial districts.

 

Henrico County General Government currently has more than 30 agencies.  Department Heads are appointed by the County Manager, with the exception of the elected constitutional officers.  Henrico County is an equal opportunity employer and, when you join us, you will be surrounded by fellow associates who come from all walks of life, all types of cultural backgrounds and all ages.

 

General State of Duties

Closing Date:  This position closes on Monday, April 15, 2013.

 

The working title of this position is Sports Tourism Coordinator.

 

Will be responsible for sports tourism initiatives in Henrico County; does related work as required.

 

Essential Duties

 

Considerable knowledge of and familiarity with national, regional and local sports groups and organizations;

 

Ability to attend local, regional and national sports tournaments, events and meetings to represent Henrico County and to retain and/or recruit future events. Travel and weekend work required;

 

Understanding of and ability to utilize social media and ability to update tourism web site.

 

Ability to develop and implement sports marketing strategies and plan to attract athletic events, tournaments, games, exhibitions and sports related events;

 

Superior oral and written communication skills;

 

Professional attire and conduct mandatory;

 

Working knowledge of cutting edge principals and practices of marketing with a focus on sports;

 

Ability to develop and maintain good working relationships with internal and external departments and organizations, school personnel, co-workers and the public;

 

Ability to cooperate effectively with public and private groups, organizations, agencies and the general public;

 

Ability to keep accurate records and make cogent reports and to prepare proposals and news releases; good organizational skills and attention to detail.

 

Good knowledge of community recreation theory, planning and practice; good knowledge of all phases of recreational activities; skill in recreation leadership and ability to supervise effectively; ability to develop and maintain good working relationships with school personnel, co- workers and the public; ability to cooperate effectively with public and private groups, organizations, agencies and the general public; ability to keep accurate records and make cogent reports; good organizational skills; good oral and written communication skills.

 

Minimum Qualifications

Possession of a bachelor’s degree in recreation or a related field and two (2) years of related work experience, including one (1) year of supervisory experience; OR, a bachelor’s degree in a unrelated field and two (2) years of supervisory experience; OR, any equivalent combination of experience and training which provides the required knowledge, skills and abilities.

 

Additional Information

This position requires strong organizational astuteness and strong professionalism in conduct and attire. Professional attire and conduct mandatory.

 

All applicants are required to attach a cover letter electronically to their application in order to be considered for the position.

 

A criminal history record check and fingerprinting is conducted on all persons conditionally offered employment, including a conditional offer of initial employment, or a conditional offer to promote, demote, or laterally transfer an employee.

How To Apply

You apply for positions with Henrico County general government through our on-line applicant system, which is available 24-hours a day, 7-days a week with an Internet connection.  Please access our job site portal through www.henricojobs.com or register (new applicants) or login (returning applicants) to this site from the home page.

 

https://www.myhenrico.org/OA_HTML/OA.jsp?OAFunc=IRC_VIS_VAC_DISPLAY&OAMC=R&p_svid=43768&p_spid=2155132lzbUVtj3

 

11.)  Southeast Travel Editor & Brand Manager, VisitSouth, Gulf Shores, AL

http://www.indeed.com/cmp/Compass-Media/jobs/Southeast-Travel-Editor-Brand-Manager-43c417ec5b7b05b8

 

12.)  Global Air Services Coordinator, G Adventure, Toronto, Canada

http://www.gadventures.com/careers/position-details/global-air-services-coordinator/

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

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Your Very Next Step newsletter for February 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for February 2013

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Energy and persistence conquer all things.”

– Benjamin Franklin

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 611 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Niagra Falls

***  The Airfarewatchblog Airline Fees Guide

***  Navigating the land

***  Wandering through the medinas of Morocco

***  What is the GBBC?

***  Minnesota’s Breeding Bird Atlas: Help Write the Book on Minnesota’s Breeding Birds!

***  Albatross named Wisdom astounds scientists by producing chick at age 62

***   Welcome to Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: February 2013
California’s Truckee River Bike Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  SoMo Pima Canyon Trail & Land Rehab, VOAZ, Pima Canyon, AZ

2.)  Volunteer Naturalist, Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy,  Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority, Los Angeles, CA

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Public Affairs Specialist, Campbell Creek Science Center (CCSC), Anchorage District Office (ADO), Bureau of Land Management, Department Of The Interior, Anchorage, Alaska

2.)  Executive Director, Point Reyes National Seashore Association, Point Reyes Station, California

3.)  Vice President/Executive Director, Audubon Connecticut, Greenwich, Connecticut

4.)  Director Integrated Marketing (Digital and Advertising) (HQ6461), REI, Kent, Washington

5.)  Marketing and Communications Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., Audubon, PA

6.)  Lead Teacher Naturalist (Summer), Richardson Bay Audubon Center & Sanctuary, Tiburon, CA

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  From Mat Matta:

 

Niagra Falls

 

Hi Ned,

 

Just dropping you a note on my recent trip to Buffalo, Niagara and Toronto.   Did all three cities over the course of weekend hockey tournament.

 

My son’s hockey team played in a PeeWee hockey tournament in Niagara Falls  so we took the opportunity to experience as much as we could.

 

We flew into Buffalo one day early so we could head straight to the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto.    I hadn’t been to the Hall in 20 years and my son had never been so it was fun to see him see all the great exhibits.  We took pics with the Stanley Cup and played the interactive games and watched some very good videos and movies.   You need to devote at least three hours to fully enjoy all the exhibits.

 

Following the Hall of Fame, we dined at Wayne Gretzky’s restaurant in Toronto and were greeted by his father, Walter, who was very gregarious and posed for picture and proffered autographs to all comers.     The food was surprisingly good for a sports bar.  There is a small Gretzky museum  in the restaurant.   Walter said he influenced Wayne in his career by preaching that from early on you must be prepared to play  meaning he ate right and got plenty of sleep.

 

We also went as a team to the Anchor Bar in downtown Buffalo.    Buffalo wings were supposedly invented there by Teressa Bellissimo  in 1964.  The wings were spicy and the beer was cold.  The Anchor bar didn’t disappoint.  Buffalo also has a small military waterfront park which includes 2 ships and a submarine along with a few planes, tanks and other vehicles.   It’s small but perfect for kids to blow off some energy .

 

Niagara Falls in the winter is quite a sight.   The mist settles on everything creating a thick coating of ice.  The area surrounding the falls is filled with plenty of souvenir shops, restaurants and casinos.  We ate lunch just a few feet from the Horseshoe Falls on the Canadian side.   Unfortunately much of the Falls  attractions close in October so we couldn’t  ride the Maid of the Mist or explore the caves.   I do recommend viewing from both sides of the border.  On the American side I recommend driving on to  Goat Island  which is a State Park to view the Falls in a  sylvan setting.

 

And in the tournament, my son’s team made it to the semi-finals before falling to a team from Mississauga, Ontario.

 

***  The Airfarewatchblog Airline Fees Guide

http://www.airfarewatchdog.com/blog/13842767/introducing-our-brand-new-airline-fees-guide/

 

***  Navigating the land:

 

The idea of hunting the backcountry is increasingly appealing to many folks. Today, it seems everyone has a GPS unit and can travel for days over diverse country. But, what occurs when the GPS is inoperable or the batteries die? Do you know how to navigate without your GPS in country you’ve never been in or seen in daylight? How about when fog or snow sets in? How competent are you with a map and compass?

If we are going to travel in the backcountry away from modern conveniences then we need to know how to return to the trailhead. It means personal responsibility beyond the green gate. Make the effort to learn basic navigation skills, determining declination, finding north on a compass and returning to your vehicle. Learn these skills and the backcountry becomes an endless wilderness that has no boundaries.

As a former search and rescue volunteer, I remember a group that was lost in the Cascade Range of Oregon. They called 911 to report they were lost, and when an intervening Sheriff’s deputy asked if they had a GPS, the answer was, “Yes, but we don’t know how to use it!”

A year later a similar call to 911 revealed that this family still had not learned the basics of GPS operation, as they requested “rescue” again from nearly the same location. The point being: know your equipment and how to use it.

If you don’t have navigation skills, even staying on roads and trails can lead to an unplanned overnight in the backcountry. One October an Oregon hunter on an ATV drove on a road away from camp to dispose of a deer carcass. Once he left the carcass, the return to camp seemed simple enough, but somehow he couldn’t follow his ATV tracks back to camp. He spent the night out without essentials. The next day he was found very cold and lucky to be alive. One of the lessons learned: always have the 12 essentials (see side bar). Staying hydrated and warm are two of the fundamentals of survival – add a head lamp to assist in gathering wood, and the fear factor is halved! Carry fresh spare batteries for all electronic devices.

At one time or another, many of us have become disoriented in patches of blow-down or stands of second-growth or dense young trees. Or when we’ve lost a trail due to snow-drifts or while navigating in the dark, but we’re not lost. The difference between disorientation and being lost can be subtle, but the decision between self-help and calling for rescue becomes critical.

The “disoriented” hiker may still have landmarks at his/her disposal, where the “lost” hiker may have none. When truly lost, the hiker typically wanders for hours or days in circles so random that search-and-rescue personnel experience difficulty making sense of the route. There is a common belief to always go downhill, or drop in elevation if disoriented. The reasoning is, “You’ll eventually hit a road.” Not true. That strategy can be very dangerous in many locales. So, how do you stay found?

  1. Know how to navigate using a map and compass.
  2. At a minimum, always carry a map, compass, headlamp and fire-starting equipment – and know how to start a fire in any conditions.
  3. Never go anywhere without the 12 Essentials.*
  4. Have a communication plan. If hunting with partners, test frequencies. Sample language: “I have a Fox 40 whistle. I’ll turn on my FRS/GMRS radio on-the-hour, starting at 0900. Then, every-hour, if we miss communicating, check back every half-hour.”
  5. Sit-down once disoriented. Don’t wait until you’re lost. This can be the most difficult survival decision a disoriented person may make. Get your bearings before moving.
  6. Always tell a reliable friend your itinerary. Leave a hide-a-key and notes with a map of your planned routing at home and in your vehicle, and give contingencies as best you can. If you are diverted from the original plan, decide whether sitting and waiting for rescue is the prudent thing.

Karl Findling, is the Oregon BHA representative-at-large and owner of Oregon Pack Works, LLC. He makes no claims to be an expert in backcountry navigation. The above stories and tips are merely stories and tips. Actual experiences may vary.

Note: The original Ten Essentials list was assembled in the 1930s by The Mountaineers, a Seattle-based organization for climbers and outdoor adventurers. In 2003, the group’s updated “systems” approach made its debut in its seminal text on climbing and outdoor exploration, Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills (The Mountaineers Books, 2010), now in its eighth edition.

 

* The 12 Essentials

 

Navigation (map and compass)

Sun protection (sunglasses and sunscreen)

Insulation (extra clothing)

Illumination (headlamp/flashlight)

First-aid supplies

Fire (waterproof matches/lighter/candles)

Repair kit and tools

Nutrition (extra food)

Hydration (extra water)

Emergency shelter

Communication (whistle/cell or satellite phone and/or, GMRS/FRS radio/ELB or SPOT®)

GPS (Global Positioning System)

 

Classic Ten Essentials:

Map

Compass

Sunglasses and sunscreen

Extra clothing

Headlamp/flashlight

First-aid supplies

Fire starter

Matches

Knife

Extra food

The idea of hunting the backcountry is increasingly appealing to many folks. Today, it seems everyone has a GPS unit and can travel for days over diverse country. But, what occurs when the GPS is inoperable or the batteries die? Do you know how to navigate without your GPS in country you’ve never been in or seen in daylight? How about when fog or snow sets in? How competent are you with a map and compass?

If we are going to travel in the backcountry away from modern conveniences then we need to know how to return to the trailhead. It means personal responsibility beyond the green gate. Make the effort to learn basic navigation skills, determining declination, finding north on a compass and returning to your vehicle. Learn these skills and the backcountry becomes an endless wilderness that has no boundaries.

As a former search and rescue volunteer, I remember a group that was lost in the Cascade Range of Oregon. They called 911 to report they were lost, and when an intervening Sheriff’s deputy asked if they had a GPS, the answer was, “Yes, but we don’t know how to use it!”

A year later a similar call to 911 revealed that this family still had not learned the basics of GPS operation, as they requested “rescue” again from nearly the same location. The point being: know your equipment and how to use it.

http://www.backcountryhunters.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=299&Itemid=123

 

***  Wandering through the medinas of Morocco

 

This Washington Post story brought back memories of our adventure in Morocco back when we were living overseas, especially the time spent inside the medina at Fes.

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/travel/wandering-through-the-medinas-of-morocco/2013/02/07/80bfcc36-6a5f-11e2-95b3-272d604a10a3_story.html

 

***  What is the GBBC?

 

The 2013 GBBC will take place Friday, February 15, through Monday, February 18. Please join us for the 16th annual count!

 

The Great Backyard Bird Count is an annual 4-day event that engages bird watchers of all ages in counting birds to create a real-time snapshot of where the birds are.

 

http://www.birdsource.org/gbbc

 

***  Minnesota’s Breeding Bird Atlas: Help Write the Book on Minnesota’s Breeding Birds!

 

(Metro and Central MN, NW, NE, and Southern MN)

 

This is a great opportunity to ‘bird with a purpose’ by participating in the Minnesota Breeding Bird Atlas, the largest, most comprehensive bird conservation project ever conducted in Minnesota. In 2009, Minnesota began this 5-year project to document every breeding species in the state and where they nest. If you ever needed a reason to get outside and go birding, this is it.

 

Now, after four successful seasons, there is only one more year to contribute breeding bird information and make a lasting contribution to Minnesota bird conservation.  In 2013, volunteers and partners will submit their sightings before September 1 which will wrap-up this historic project.  We are expecting the final season to our best ever!

 

There are Two Ways to Help

1.Surveyors select and sign-up for a critical (priority) block. Blocks are available throughout the state. Surveyors spend about 20 hours between March and August driving, walking, paddling, or biking through different habitats within their survey block to record what they see. The goal for every block survey is to record as many species as you can find with the strongest evidence of breeding observed for each species.  Evidence includes: seeing a pair in suitable habitat, an adult carrying nesting material or food, or seeing fledglings.

 

2. Field Observers document evidence of breeding species the same as surveyors, however, they are can submit observations from anywhere throughout the state or from your backyard or favorite birding site.

 

Participants do not need to be experts but need to be sure the species they report is correct.  We do not count birds and you don’t have to find nests, although by watching bird behavior you will definitely find them.

 

Please join us!

Your observations will help us learn more about our breeding birds and you will improve your bird identification and observational skills. Results from the Atlas will map the distribution of every breeding species we find and support local, county, state, and regional conservation planning.

 

To learn more about this project, how to participate, or see Atlas results to date, check out our project website, www.mnbba.org. Review the Handbook under the Materials tab and then use the Easy Guide to get started.

 

Still have questions? Contact the Project Coordinator, Bonnie Sample at bsample@audubon.org, or 651-739-9332, ext 20.

 

The Minnesota Breeding Bird Atlas is funded by the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund and the MN DNR, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Audubon Minnesota, the Minnesota Ornithologists’ Union, and the Natural Resources Research Institute at UMD.

 

http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/volunteering/opps/index.html#atlas

 

***  Albatross named Wisdom astounds scientists by producing chick at age 62

 

By Darryl Fears

The Washington Post

She is described as awesome. And wonderful. And maybe a little weird. She is the world’s oldest known living wild bird at age 62, and she produced a healthy chick that hatched Sunday.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/albatross-named-wisdom-astounds-scientists-by-giving-birth-at-age-62/2013/02/05/f46a68a6-6fc5-11e2-8b8d-e0b59a1b8e2a_story.html?wpisrc=emailtoafriend

 

***  Welcome to Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge

 

Midway, part of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, is one of the world’s most spectacular wildlife experiences. Nearly three million birds call it home for much of each year, including the world’s largest population of Laysan Albatrosses, or “gooney birds”. Hawaiian monk seals, green sea turtles and spinner dolphins frequent Midway’s crystal blue lagoon.

 

Midway became an “overlay” refuge in 1988, while still under the primary jurisdiction of the Navy. With the closure of Naval Air Facility Midway Island in 1993, there began a transition from bullets to birds, a change in mission from national defense to wildlife conservation.

 

Midway is one of the most remote coral atolls on earth. Yet, it is much, much more!

 

•the last link in a global telegraph system, inaugurated by a message from President Teddy Roosevelt on the Fourth of July, 1903

 

•a landing site for Pan Am Clippers enroute across the Pacific Ocean in the late 1930s

 

•the focus of a 1942 battle that changed the tide of war in the Pacific

 

•from July 1942 to the end of hostilities, Midway served as a submarine base that aided in bringing the war to a close

 

•naval air facility that played a pivotal role in support of the Korean War, the Cold War and the Vietnam War

http://www.fws.gov/midway/

 

Wisdom Hatches Another Chick! (February 5, 2012)

 

The world’s oldest living Laysan albatross, Wisdom, and her mate successfully hatched their chick on Sunday morning, February 3. Wisdom’s mate tends to his newly hatched chick just hours after it hatched. While this photo was taken, Wisdom was currently at sea feeding and will return when it is time for her shift to keep her youngest safe and warm

 

http://www.fws.gov/midway/whatsnew.html

 

Midway Atoll

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midway_Atoll

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: February 2013
California’s Truckee River Bike Trail
By Laura Stark

“As it lay there with the shadows of the mountains brilliantly photographed upon its still surface, I thought it must surely be the fairest picture the whole earth affords.”
—Mark Twain, American writer and humorist, on Lake Tahoe in Roughing It, published 1872

Surrounded by the majestic, snowcapped mountains of the Sierra Nevada and renowned for its clear blue water, the country’s second deepest lake is surely as stunning today as when Mark Twain saw it more than a century ago. In fact, Lake Tahoe was recently deemed America’s best lake by popular vote in a USA Today survey. Although dozens of tributaries flow into the lake, only one flows out, and it is along this waterway that the Truckee River Bike Trail is aligned.

“It’s a pretty spectacular setting,” says Barry Bergman, manager of trail development at Rails-to-Trails Conservancy’s Western office. “And it’s a year-round destination. The biggest crowds are in the winter, but it’s also busy in the summer because of the lake.”

The trail follows the former route of a tourist train that operated in the early 1900s. The Lake Tahoe Railway and Transportation Company took passengers from the bustling railroad town of Truckee (a stop along the First Intercontinental Railroad) to Tahoe City on the lake’s shore. From there, travelers could take steamships to other destinations on the lake. The railroad was leased to Southern Pacific Company in 1925, but by 1943 it had ceased operation, no match for the burgeoning car industry.

The critical role of railroads in the shaping of Truckee is fully explored in the Truckee Railroad Museum, which opened in 2010. Although the rail-trail stops about nine miles short of Truckee, you can continue heading north from its endpoint in Olympic Valley along the wide shoulder of Highway 89 to the downtown area where the museum is housed next to a historical, and still-functioning, train station. Before the railroad, the town was an important stagecoach and wagon stop called Coburn Station (after a saloon keeper) and retains its Wild West character in its rugged small-town feel and 19th century buildings.

The name Truckee that now graces the town, river and rail-trail, predates the coming of the railroad. Once known as the Salmon Trout River, the waterway was renamed for a leader of the Paiute tribe, known as Chief Truckee, in gratitude for guiding westward settlers through the area in the mid-1800s.

One notorious California-bound group, the Donner party, did not fair well. In late October 1846, the travel-weary group of more than 80 emigrants, many of whom were children, became stranded on the shores of Lake Truckee for several weeks in heavy snow, unable to complete their journey across the mountains. When they were finally rescued the following February, nearly half the group had perished, many from starvation. In a desperate attempt to survive, some had resorted to cannibalism. The Donner Memorial State Park in western Truckee stands as a testament to their tragic struggle.

South of Truckee the trail picks up in Olympic Valley, which was known as Squaw Valley when it was chosen to host the 1960 winter Olympic Games. In true American style, it was the first Olympic Games to tabulate scores by computer (IBM) and the opening and closing ceremonies were produced by famed animator Walt Disney. The elaborate entertainment involved 5,000 performers and set the standard for future Olympic Games.

Continuing south, through an evergreen forest, the asphalt trail closely follows the Truckee River, a pleasant place to cool off during a summer ride and an incredibly popular outlet for fishing, white water rafting, kayaking and paddle boarding. The area’s popularity is, however, a double-edged sword.

“The river is heavily impacted by recreational use and its banks are becoming very degraded,” says Lisa Wallace, executive director of the Truckee River Watershed Council. “We’re losing vegetation and overhanging banks for fish.”

To remedy the situation, the organization is partnering with the Tahoe City Public Utility District (TCPUD) and others to add more environmentally friendly river access points and directional signage in the hopes of improving the waterway so that it can continue to be enjoyed responsibly.

With this strong community support and its abundant beauty, the watershed became part of the National Forest Foundation’s “Treasured Landscapes, Unforgettable Experiences” program this past fall, one of only 14 sites chosen nationwide. The program will support additional efforts to restore and protect the much-loved and much-used resource.

The trail’s nearly seven-mile journey ends in Tahoe City, the gateway to the lake, just as the trains did decades ago. Interestingly, the unincorporated community is a city in name only. One of the responsibilities of its governing body, the TCPUD, is the development and management of the rail-trail.

“In the 1970s, TCPUD started a bicycle trail network in our district,” says Cindy Gustafson, the organization’s general manager. “Ever since that time, we’ve been working to complete a unified trail.”

Just this summer, a critical piece of the network fell into place when the Lakeside Trail, which directly connects to the Truckee River Bike Trail, opened in downtown Tahoe City. Nineteen miles of paved off-road trail are now accessible along the western and northern shores of the lake. In an area known for its extreme sports, the level, smooth pathways are a welcome addition for walkers, casual cyclists, inline skaters and families.

“We had all these segments of trail, but the biggest gap has been right through the heart of Tahoe City,” says Gustafson. “It forced bicyclists to share the road on a narrow two-lane roadway. The Lakeside Trail has connected everything together.”

With 300,000 to 400,000 annual visitors on the Truckee River Bike Trail alone, Gustafson says the community has been “hugely supportive” of these efforts. “It’s the most highly rated recreational facility that we operate,” she says. “Visitors and residents want to get outdoors and not be trapped in their cars.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  SoMo Pima Canyon Trail & Land Rehab, VOAZ, Pima Canyon, AZ

http://www.outdoorvolunteer.org/viewevent.aspx?eventid=798

 

2.)  Volunteer Naturalist, Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy,  Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority, Los Angeles, CA

 

Volunteer naturalists provide guided interptetive nature programs, host our nature center, or help patrol trails at many of our park locations. Thes duties are critical to meeting the agency goal of providing visitor service and education programs to the public at our park locations. Volunteers take part in a nationally recognized training program before staffing facilities and helping with special events. Additional training is provided for volunteers leading educational and interpretive programs for both schools and the general public. Continuous training is offered throughout the year in other specialty areas. Parks featuring volunteer led programs include Santa Clarita Woodlands, Franklin Canyon Park, King Gillete Ranch, Temescal Gateway Park, Upper Las Virgenes Open Space Preserve, Vista Hermosa Natural Park, and the Puente/Chino Hills in Whittier.

 

http://www.lamountains.com/involved.asp#volunteer naturalist

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Public Affairs Specialist, Campbell Creek Science Center (CCSC), Anchorage District Office (ADO), Bureau of Land Management, Department Of The Interior, Anchorage, Alaska

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/335933600

 

2.)  Executive Director, Point Reyes National Seashore Association, Point Reyes Station, California

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=327200017

 

3.)  Vice President/Executive Director, Audubon Connecticut, Greenwich, Connecticut

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=25501

 

4.)  Director Integrated Marketing (Digital and Advertising) (HQ6461), REI, Kent, Washington

https://www.rei.apply2jobs.com/ProfExt/index.cfm?fuseaction=mExternal.showJob&RID=6461

 

5.)  Marketing and Communications Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., Audubon, PA

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1569/job

 

6.)  Lead Teacher Naturalist (Summer), Richardson Bay Audubon Center & Sanctuary, Tiburon, CA

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1616/job

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

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Your Very Next Step newsletter for December 2012

 Your Very Next Step newsletter for December 2012
By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com
“How did it get so late so soon?

Its night before its afternoon.

December is here before its June.

My goodness how the time has flewn.

How did it get so late so soon?”

– Dr. Seuss

“Sunshine is delicious, rain is refreshing, wind braces us up, snow is exhilarating; there is really no such thing as bad weather, only different kinds of good weather.”

– John Ruskin

 

“Advice is like snow – the softer it falls, the longer it dwells upon, and the deeper in sinks into the mind.”

– Samuel Taylor Coleridge

 

“I used to be Snow White, but I drifted.”

– Mae West

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

Subscribe for free. Send a blank email to:
yourverynextstep-subscribe@topica.com.

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 650 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our website (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel:

 

*** In this issue:

***  Rowing: The other paddle sport

***  Natural Poison Ivy Remedies For the Outdoors-person

***  Cold-Weather Riding: Tips to Stay Warm on the Bike

***  An Iceland Grand Tour

***  Best airlines for extra legroom in coach

***  From the  American Hiking Society:  Hiking Etiquette

***  In Virginia, when it comes to snakeheads: Catch and destroy

***  Best iPhone Applications for Winter Outdoor Activities

***  Rental car companies combining

***  Putting science back in science fair projects:

***  10 Best Airlines You’ve Never Flown

***  Condé Nast Traveler Readers’ Choice Awards 2012

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Backcountry Volunteer, Big Cypress National Preserve, Ochopee, Florida

2.)  Volunteer service opportunity, Wilderness Volunteers, Pinnacles National Monument, Paicines, CA

3.)  Communications/Public Relations/Marketing Volunteer, Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: December 2012
New Zealand’s Otago Central Rail Trail
*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Web Developer – C# / ASP.NET / SQL, Altrec.com & GreatOutdoors.com, Redmond, Oregon

2.)  Conservation Fellow, Village Enterprise, Hoima, Uganda

3.)  Editorial and Digital Internship, BACKPACKER magazine, Chantilly, VA

4.)  Cruise Representative, Royal Caribbean Cruises, Ltd., Wichita, Kansas

5.)  Senior Director, Digital Strategy, Wilderness Society, Washington, D.C.

6.)  Outdoor Recreation Advisor, Wisconsin Union, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

7.)  Senior Manager, Corporate Sponsorships, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York

8.)  Marketing Assistant, Uniworld Boutique River Cruises, Encino, California

9.)  Communications Officer, NEW FOREST NATIONAL PARK AUTHORITY, Lymington, Hampshire, UK

10.)  Marketing Manager, Cheyenne Mountain Resort, Colorado Springs, CO

11.)  Public Information Specialist III, ND game and Fish Department, Bismarck, ND

13.)  Director of Communications, American Bird Conservancy, Washington, DC

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Rowing: The other paddle sport

 

By Joel Rogers

 

http://www.greatoutdoors.com/published/rowing-the-other-paddle-sport

 

***  Natural Poison Ivy Remedies For the Outdoors-person

 

by Robbi Drake

http://www.outdoor.com/outdoor-safety/natural-poison-ivy-remedies-for-the-outdoors-person/

 

***  Cold-Weather Riding: Tips to Stay Warm on the Bike

 

By Frank Eastland and Todd Kaib (For Active.com)

http://www.active.com/cycling/Articles/Cold-weather_riding__Tips_to_stay_warm_on_the_bike

 

***  An Iceland Grand Tour

 

Photographer Adam Jaquette show us the wild side to Iceland

 

By Adam Jaquette

http://www.greatoutdoors.com/photogallery/an-iceland-grand-tour

 

***  Best airlines for extra legroom in coach

By Ed Perkins

Smarter Travel

http://travel.yahoo.com/ideas/best-airlines-for-extra-legroom-in-coach.html

 

***  From the  American Hiking Society:

 

Hiking Etiquette

 

Be respectful of the land and other hikers.

Almost every group of people have some unwritten rules to help govern their activity and make things more pleasant for all those participating. Rules such as not cutting in line at a ski lift and keeping your elbows off the table when eating at Mom’s house are just two examples.

Hikers are no different. Following a few unwritten rules can help make your hike and the hike for others more pleasant. Among some commonly observed practices are:

• Hike quietly. Speak in low voices and turn your cell phone down, if not off. Enjoy the sounds of nature and let others do the same.

• If taking a break, move off the trail a ways to allow others to pass by unobstructed.

• Don’t toss your trash – not even biodegradable items such as banana peels. It is not good for animals to eat non-native foods and who wants to look at your old banana peel while it ever-so-slowly decomposes? If you packed it in, pack it back out.

• Hikers going downhill yield to those hiking uphill.

• When bringing a pet on a hike, be sure to keep it on a leash and under control. Don’t forget to pack out pet waste as well.

• Don’t feed the wildlife. While many animals stay hidden, others are not so shy. Giving these creatures food only disrupts their natural foraging habits.

• Leave what you find. The only souvenirs a hiker should come home with are photographs and happy memories. (And maybe an improved fitness level!)

• When relieving yourself outdoors, be sure to do so 200 feet away from the trail and any water sources. Follow Leave No Trace principles.

• Walk through the mud or puddle and not around it, unless you can do so without going off the trail. Widening a trail by going around puddles, etc. is bad for trail sustainability. Just because it looks easy to cut the corner off of a switchback doesn’t mean it is a good idea. Help preserve the trail by staying on the trail.

• If hiking in a group, don’t take up the whole width of the trail; allow others to pass.

 

http://www.americanhiking.org/HikingResources/Etiquette/

 

***  In Virginia, when it comes to snakeheads: Catch and destroy:

 

All anglers are reminded to acquaint themselves with a good description of the northern snakehead fish. If you should manage to catch one of these exotic imports, please kill it immediately and report the catch to either the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries or the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_1HmUY5EOo

 

***  Best iPhone Applications for Winter Outdoor Activities

 

By Christina Scannapiego (for Active.com)

http://www.active.com/outdoors/articles/Best-iPhone-Applications-for-Winter.htm

 

***  Rental car companies combining

 

Wary Of Consolidation, Buyers Could Benefit From Hertz-Dollar Thrifty Deal

 

http://www.businesstravelnews.com/More-News/Wary-Of-Consolidation,-Buyers-Could-Benefit-From-Hertz-Dollar-Thrifty-Deal/?ida=Car%20Rental&a=proc&cid=eltrDaily

 

***  Putting science back in science fair projects:

 

http://www.yourwildlife.org/2012/11/putting-the-science-back-into-science-fair-projects/

 

***  10 Best Airlines You’ve Never Flown

By Ed Perkins

Smarter Travel

http://www.smartertravel.com/photo-galleries/editorial/10-best-airlines-youve-never-flown.html?id=142

 

***  Condé Nast Traveler Readers’ Choice Awards 2012

 

Cities, Islands, Hotels, Resorts, Cruises, Airlines

 

Who but Condé Nast Traveler readers would have heard of, let alone traveled to, Bozcaada or Knysna? They’re winners this year, and that is only part of what makes these Readers’ Choice Awards so exceptional. Not just the numbers—although a record 46,476 readers participated. Not just the effect—always raising the bar, with 370 hotels, resorts, and cruise lines, incredibly, rating above 90. But also the vigorous curiosity to go where so few follow. You even, occasionally, locate sheer perfection—this year in Australia, granting a perfect score of 100 to Qualia resort on the Great Barrier Reef. In this, the 25th annual survey, you elected a grand total of 1,306 winners.

 

http://www.cntraveler.com/readers-choice-awards

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Backcountry Volunteer, Big Cypress National Preserve, Ochopee, Florida

 

The freshwaters of the Big Cypress Swamp, essential to the health of the neighboring Everglades, support the rich marine estuaries along Florida’s southwest coast. Protecting over 729,000 acres of this vast swamp, Big Cypress National Preserve contains a mixture of tropical and temperate plant communities that are home to a diversity of wildlife, including the elusive Florida panther.

 

The goal of the Backcountry Volunteer Program is to increase the ability of the NPS to contact, assist and educate visitors in the Preserve backcountry, assist with minor trail maintenance as needed and aid in the monitoring of the backcountry trail system.

 

Backcountry Volunteers are trained in the use of Off-Road Vehicles (ORV) and travel along backcountry trails that allow for ORV use assisting and educating visitors as needed. Volunteers perform minor trail maintenance and identify major trail issues that need to be addressed.

 

Backcountry Volunteers are customer service oriented, enjoy the outdoors, have a basic understanding of backcountry travel and are good team players. Prior knowledge of Big Cypress trails and ORVs is beneficial for these volunteers, but not necessary. To become part of the program, a short training commitment is required.

 

The entrance to Big Cypress is located on Interstate 75 (Alligator Alley) and US Highway 41 (Tamiami Trail). These are the main roads that traverse the site. Visitor facilities and most activities originate from the Tamiami Trail.

 

Each year hundreds of volunteers contribute approximately 30,000 hours of service to Big Cypress National Preserve. Volunteers are involved in virtually every aspect of preserve operations. Some work full-time during the winter season, while others may work one day a week or even for a few hours on a special project. Some are students and others are retirees looking for adventure during their “golden years.” Some maintain and/or patrol trails while others work as campground hosts or as visitor center personnel.

 

Regardless of age or background, these folks share a desire to make a positive contribution to the management of the preserve. Volunteers are a valuable and valued part of our operation and our community.

 

For more information regarding the Big Cypress National Preserve volunteer program, please contact the preserve Volunteer Coordinator at 239-695-1229, or by email (http://www.nps.gov/bicy/supportyourpark/volunteer.htm).

 

Mailing Address:

Attention: Volunteer Coordinator

Big Cypress National Preserve

33000 Tamiami Trail East

Ochopee, FL 34141

 

http://www.nps.gov/bicy/supportyourpark/backcountry-volunteer.htm

 

2.)  Volunteer service opportunity, Wilderness Volunteers, Pinnacles National Monument, Paicines, CA

 

Apr 21st – Apr 27th 2013

 

Strenuous

 

Established in 1908 to preserve the incongruent and beautiful rock formations of its namesake, Pinnacles National Monument encompasses about 26,000 acres east of central California’s Salinas Valley in the southern portion of the Gabilan Mountains, one of a series of parallel northwest-trending ridges and valleys that make up the Central Coast Range. The giant San Andreas Fault split an ancient volcano and the Pacific Plate crept north, carrying the Pinnacles. The work of water and wind on these erodible volcanic rocks has formed the unusual rock structures seen today. Massive monoliths, spires, sheer-walled canyons and talus passages define millions of years of erosion, faulting and tectonic plate movement.

 

The rolling chaparral and dramatic rock faces of Pinnacles National Monument inspire loyalty in visitors from picnickers to rock-climbers, and from stargazers to cave explorers, and of course to volunteers. Pinnacles is visually stunning. This striking beauty is attributable, in part, to the Monument’s geologic formations, showcase chaparral habitat, finely integraded ecosystems, and protected native plant and animal diversity. Pinnacles National Monument is a release site for the endangered California condor, and the birds can sometimes be seen from hiking trails throughout the park.

 

Our service project is assisting Pinnacle’s vegetation team by removing exotic, non-native plants from backcountry canyons and streams. Spring is the ideal time to be in Pinnacles, with wildflowers and wildlife all reawakening. We’ll camp in a designated campsite in tents or our vehicles and walk or make short daily drives to worksites in the backcountry.

 

This project features a vegetarian menu with optional meat ingredients on many meals. We can relax at the end of the work day — our full-time cook will have dinner ready for us, including plenty of fresh ingredients and some meals baked in her Dutch oven.

 

Check out more photos from last year’s Pinnacles project in our gallery.

 

The fee for 2013 projects is $299. If you want to be on the waitlist for a project that is currently full, submit an application and select the Pay By Check option. We will notify you if space becomes available. If you are still interested in doing the trip, payment will be due at that time.

 

Offered by Wilderness Volunteers.  This is just one of many projects offered by WV.

 

http://www.wildernessvolunteers.org/php/project/+Pinnacles+National+Monument/1c8fd251fcb0c3ad91178fd9782c7cc7.html

 

3.)  Communications/Public Relations/Marketing Volunteer, Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

http://www.idealist.org/view/volop/gH7HJHGxbxjd/

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: December 2012
New Zealand’s Otago Central Rail Trail
By Laura Stark

“Not all those who wander are lost.” – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

This month, fans of the popular Lord of the Rings movies are eagerly anticipating the latest installment of the acclaimed series, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. For an experience in Middle Earth, adventurers both tall and small can take their own journey along the Otago Central Rail Trail, a well-kept gravel pathway running 150 kilometers (more than 90 miles) through the region where many of the film’s sequences were shot. The gorgeous backdrop for the movies—wind-swept vistas, rugged mountains, lush green farm fields, and jaw-dropping river gorges—can all be found on this unique rail-trail on New Zealand’s South Island.

“The Hobbit people were here for quite a while,” says Kate Wilson, chair of the Otago Central Rail Trail Charitable Trust, a nonprofit group established in 1994 to raise funds for the trail and promote its use. “They were filming on Rock and Pillar, Taieri Ridge and around Queenstown.”

Queenstown, known as a hub for skiing, whitewater rafting and other extreme sports, is not far from the rail-trail’s western end at the town of Clyde. But even without the side trip, there is plenty to experience on the trail itself, named after the railway line built here in the early 20th century to transport produce from this rich agricultural heartland.

Perhaps one of the best embodiments of this early rural culture can be found at Hayes Engineering Works in Oturehua. It’s the factory of Ernest Hayes—farmer, miller and inventor extraordinaire—who invented and produced many types of farming tools, some still in use today. His wife, Hannah, supported these endeavors by going door to door by bicycle to sell the unique products. Their 1895 homestead, as well as the original workshop, windmill and other structures, can be explored today in this fascinating living museum.

Before the railway, gold fever swept the area in the 1860s. In Oturehua you can visit the Golden Progress Mine, a short detour off the trail. Its tall winding tower straddles a shaft that was used to reach gold-bearing quartz deep in the ground. Many other relics of this gold-mining era can be found along the pathway, but perhaps none as unusual as the Platypus, New Zealand’s first submarine, built in 1874 to dredge the river beds for gold. After an unsuccessful test run in Otago Harbor, the project was abandoned and its rusty hull is now on display at the Strath Taieri Museum in Middlemarch, the trail’s eastern terminus.

After 85 years of rail service, road-based freight eventually replaced the Otago Central Railway and the line closed in 1990. In 1993, the federal Department of Conservation sought to turn the disused rail corridor into a recreational amenity. They found support in a small group of community volunteers who soon formed the Otago Central Rail Trail Charitable Trust to help sustain the project. The first section, about 8 kilometers (5 miles) from Clyde to Alexandra, opened in 1994. The trail continued to grow from both ends until it was finally completed in 2000.

“There was quite strong opposition in the beginning,” says Daphne Hull, a founding member of the Otago Central Rail Trail Charitable Trust. “As soon as the rail went out, the fences went up. But it’s 100 percent positive now. As a group, we went around to the communities and invited the neighbors to talk about the trail. Personal one-to-one contact is what convinced them. When the railway left, these little communities were dying and we showed them the possibilities that the trail could bring.”

Now, thousands flock to the Otago Central Rail Trail each year, infusing the local economy with more than NZ$12 million a year (about US$9.9 million) from lodging, food and other tourist spending.

“I first moved to Middlemarch in 1992, just as the railway was closing,” says Wilson. “Things were pretty dire. Some hotels and pubs were closing. It was a slow creep, but the trail made sure that hotels stayed open, and started the development of new businesses. Farmers could offer homestays and B&Bs. Middlemarch didn’t have a café then, but now supports three, which is quite something for a population of 250.”

The trail has proved so successful that it caught the attention of New Zealand’s federal government and helped spur a recent nationwide trail initiative to generate economic, social and environmental benefits for communities along trails elsewhere. The New Zealand Cycle Trail, launched in 2009 and supported by an impressive NZ$50 million investment from the government, will be one trail to rule them all: an intertwined network of off-road pathways stretching more than 2,400 kilometers (1,500 miles) across the country.

“The Otago Central Rail Trail is a local economic success story and provided, in part, the inspiration for developing a national network of cycle trails,” Prime Minister John Key stated in a press release earlier this year. “The idea was to build a nationwide network of cycle trails that would emulate the benefits of the Otago Central Rail Trail and promote New Zealand as an international cycling destination.”

But one does not simply walk into Mordor…ahem, Otago. Amenities along the trail are somewhat rustic, so you will need to be prepared. Although public toilets are available at frequent intervals, they do not provide toilet paper. In such a dry climate, water is a precious resource and often untreated, so drinking commercially bottled water is best. A flashlight will come in handy, too, as the trail’s three tunnels are unlit.

When deciding when to visit, keep in mind that New Zealand, being in the southern hemisphere, has seasons reversed from the U.S., and each as its own charms.

“The seasonal change from summer to autumn has the whole region in a vivid display of autumn color,” says Michelle Ormsby, tourism manager for Tourism Central Otago. “Particularly the orchards, vineyards and deciduous trees that line the rail trail. Spring brings the vibrancy of new growth, with a backdrop of snow-capped mountains. Summer is hot, dry and shimmery, with the days long and generally settled.”

But one thing does not change no matter when you go. Small, friendly communities line the rail-trail every 10 miles or so, welcoming you at every step. “You’ll be going through locations with some of the nicest people in the world,” says Wilson.

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Web Developer – C# / ASP.NET / SQL, Altrec.com & GreatOutdoors.com, Redmond, Oregon

 

If you only like to bug-fix and maintain, this position is NOT for you.

 

HOWEVER, if you:

 

Want to build something great from the ground up…

 

Get excited about the thought of designing and architecting a company-wide, impactful solution…

 

Want to work for a growing company in an awesome industry, putting your C# development skills to the test…

 

THEN, please read on…

 

Altrec.com, a leading online retailer of outdoor gear and apparel, is seeking a seasoned Web Developer (C#, ASP.NET, SQL) to join our talented Technology team in Redmond, Oregon. This is a great opportunity for a Web Developer who wants to build something exciting from scratch. This position will focus on brand new e-commerce web development using the latest technologies.

 

More specifically, this position will be responsible for analyzing, designing, building, and testing brand new e-commerce focused web applications. You will work in a team environment on a host of projects, ranging from small to highly complex, that have a major impact on our website functionality, our systems, and, ultimately, our customers’ experiences. You will participate in architecture sessions, design sessions, and code development and testing for these projects to support our e-commerce business.

 

We have a small, high-performing technology team, so you should expect to be challenged to help make our website the absolute best it can be.

 

In addition to working with the technology team, you should also expect to be a true partner with various company departments, including Marketing, Merchandising and Production.

 

REQUIRED SKILLS & QUALIFICATIONS:

•You must have at least 4 years of experience in the following areas:◦Outstanding skills writing web applications with C#

◦Developing web-based applications in a Windows environment using .NET

◦Excellent experience with HTML, JavaScript, CSS and jQuery

 

•At least 3 years experience developing stored procedures using Microsoft SQL Server

•Strong web security knowledge and experience

•Experience with Web Services and XML

•Demonstrated skills in systems analysis, design, coding and testing web applications

•Object-oriented analysis (OOA) and design (OOD) experience

•The ability to understand and execute in all phases of a project(s)

•A true business-oriented mindset, with the ability to solve problems through technology

•Keen sense of innovation and creativity

•Strong ability to communicate effectively at all levels in an organization

•The ability to work well in a team environment

•Bachelors’ degree in Computer Science and/or Business related field, or equivalent.

 

DESIRED SKILLS & QUALIFICATIONS:

•Experience in the e-commerce retail sector is highly preferred

•Mobile development experience is a bonus

•Social media platform development knowledge (Twitter / Facebook) is desired

•Agile development experience

•Experience with Flash

 

OUR CULTURE:

Every day is “Bring-Your-Dog-to-Work Day.” Our job is to help our customers get outside to enjoy the Great Outdoors and ensure they have the perfect gear to do it right. We embody what we do. You will see our employees wearing much of the gear we sell because we are out “in it,” in the vast playground that is Central Oregon. Our culture is informal – jeans, t-shirts and hats – and we’re also intelligent, creative business people seeking to move the needle every day. This is just some of what you will see as you walk around in our offices – just be sure to step over the occasional lazy dog!

 

BENEFITS:

 

Altrec.com is committed to providing a fulfilling work environment that allows employees to balance their personal lives with their professional careers.  This position provides generous vacation time, a full benefits package (medical, dental, and vision), and attractive company perks & discounts.  Pay is commensurate with experience.

 

TO APPLY:

 

Please email your cover letter and resume to jobs@altrec.com  with “Web Developer” in the Subject line.

 

http://www.greatoutdoors.com/published/web-developer-c-aspnet-sql

 

2.)  Conservation Fellow, Village Enterprise, Hoima, Uganda

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=399200009

 

3.)  Editorial and Digital Internship, BACKPACKER magazine, Chantilly, VA

 

Score a BACKPACKER magazine internship and learn to create inspirational stories about the outdoors. BACKPACKER is looking for self-starting, detail-obsessed journalism students with writing, editing, and new media skills for semester-long internships.

 

Students will have the opportunity to write and edit for print and the web as well opportunities to shoot in-the-field-video, obtain essential GPS and content management system knowledge, and more.

 

• work side-by-side with an award-winning print

and web staff

• shoot, star in, and edit in-the-field videos

• write bylined stories, blogs, and trip reports

• manage writers and freelancers

• plan future issues

• learn the art of great story pitching

• network with magazine editors

• test new tents, boots, packs, and sleeping bags

• obtain essential web content management and

SEO skills.

• learn PhotoShop and InDesign Basics.

*5 minutes from CU campus, on the bus line and right off the bike path

*For-credit internships offered at 20 hours per week

 

Send a cover letter and resume to BACKPACKER Associate Editor Rachel Zurer at rzurer@backpacker.com.

 

For school credit only.

http://www.backpacker.com/employment/

 

4.)  Cruise Representative, Royal Caribbean Cruises, Ltd., Wichita, Kansas

http://jobview.monster.com/Rep-Cruise-Job-Wichita-KS-115373272.aspx

 

5.)  Senior Director, Digital Strategy, Wilderness Society, Washington, D.C.

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=308000012

 

6.)  Outdoor Recreation Advisor, Wisconsin Union, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

 

Required experience and skills (for a complete job description see Position Vacancy Listing 75038, website listed below)

•Bachelor’s degree required, masters preferred in education or behavioral science with course work in student personnel, counseling, recreation or group dynamics.

•One to three years experience advising and educating college-age students and student groups in areas such as meeting facilitation, program planning, marketing, delegation, risk-management, budgeting, etc.

•One to three years professional experience in student development within a college union/student activities or recreational sports setting preferred.

•Strong written and verbal skills. Ability to produce professional reports and present ideas to a variety of audiences.

•Demonstrated critical thinking and decision making skills

•Demonstrated commitment to creating a work environment that is welcoming and respectful of everyone regardless of identity, background, interest or ability.

•Ability to facilitate exchange of ideas and assist students in translating them into plans and programs.

•Experience in any of the following outdoor activities: skiing, snowboarding, hiking, canoeing, kayaking, climbing, sailing, SCUBA diving, or windsurfing. Horseback riding/horse care experience a plus.

•Willingness to adjust personal schedule to the needs of programming, understanding the need to observe, participate in and evaluate programs. Frequent evening and some weekend hours required.

•Experience utilizing outdoor recreation as a way to teach leadership and social education skills preferred.

 

Duties and application procedure are contained in Position vacancy Listing 75038 located on the University of Wisconsin employment opportunities web site;

 

http://www.ohr.wisc.edu/WebListing/Unclassified/PVLSummary.aspx?pvl_num=75038

 

About Outdoor Recreation at the Wisconsin Union

 

The Union’s outdoor recreation space and facilities is currently under renovation and will reopen in June 2013.  This position will work with the Outdoor Recreation Director, Union staff, and students to use the construction phase as a catalyst for reflection, evaluation, and change in program offerings and services. Outdoor rentals, which will be closed until the renovation project is completed, has historically provided students, Union members, faculty, staff, and University guests with rental opportunities of outdoor equipment from canoes to camping gear.  During the renovation project, an analysis of the outdoor rentals operation will be performed and recommendations will be made as a result of the analysis.

 

Hoofers is the largest branch of the Union’s Outdoor Recreation Unit and consists of six separate clubs: Sailing, Ski & Snowboard, Outing, Riding, Mountaineering, and SCUBA, as well as five collegiate teams.  The clubs are coordinated by Hoofer Council which is composed of a representative from each of the six clubs plus five elected executives and six appointed officers.  Each club administers its own program with funds generated completely from membership dues, activity fees, and fundraising.  The current total Hoofer budget is at $1.4 million.

 

Since its inception in 1931 as a collegiate outdoor recreation program, Hoofers continues to be one of the largest and most active outdoor programs in the country. For example, the Sailing club with 1300 members has the largest inland sailing fleet and the second largest fleet in the country. The Riding Club operates a 40 acre boarding and teaching facility 30 minutes south of Madison and the Ski & Snowboard clubs hosts the Midwest’s largest ski resale every year and has been offering trips for over 45 years. The Outing Club has the Midwest’s largest paddling club and SCUBA offers PADI certified diving programs. Between 400 and 500 youth participate every summer youth riding and sailing programs. Finally, the clubs host a variety of annual events reaching thousands of members of the campus community.

 

http://jobview.monster.com/Outdoor-Recreation-Advisor-Job-Madison-WI-116282508.aspx

 

7.)  Senior Manager, Corporate Sponsorships, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=335300003

 

8.)  Marketing Assistant, Uniworld Boutique River Cruises, Encino, California

http://www.talentzoo.com/job/Marketing-Assistant/139823.html

 

9.)  Communications Officer, NEW FOREST NATIONAL PARK AUTHORITY, Lymington, Hampshire, UK

 

The New Forest National Park Authority is responsible for conserving and enhancing the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the New Forest and for promoting opportunities for the understanding and enjoyment of its special qualities by the public.

 

Communications Officer

 

£28,901 – £32,087 per annum

 

37 hours per week

 

Fixed-term to February 2015

 

An exciting opportunity has arisen to join our award-winning communications team. The Communications Officer will play a vital role in promoting the work of the National Park and as such should be a fluent, natural writer, skilled at tailoring information for a range of audiences.

 

Thriving in a fast-paced environment, you will be talented at identifying great stories and bringing these to life for a wide range of media, our website and our audiences.

 

This varied role would suit an enthusiastic media professional with superb interpersonal and account management skills coupled with press office and online experience. You will be able to juggle tasks and work under pressure to deliver a first class service within the National Park Authority, assisting colleagues across the organisation and working with partner organisations, to devise and manage multimedia activity for a range of projects and campaigns.

 

This post is based at the Authority’s offices in Lymington, Hampshire.

 

For an informal discussion please contact HR on hr@newforestnpa.gov.uk or 01590 646637.

 

For a full job description and to apply please click the button below to visit our website.

 

CVs are not accepted.

 

Closing date: 14th December 2012.

 

Interviews: w/c 14th January 2013.

 

http://jobs.guardian.co.uk/job/4549774/communications-officer/

 

10.)  Marketing Manager, Cheyenne Mountain Resort, Colorado Springs, CO

http://andrewhudsonsjobslist.com/index.cfm?PID=805&ID=8664,29681,0#j1

 

11.)  Public Information Specialist III, ND game and Fish Department, Bismarck, ND

http://www.nd.gov/hrms/jobs/7206630.html

 

13.)  Director of Communications, American Bird Conservancy, Washington, DC

 

The Director of Communications oversees all aspects of the Communications Division, including media relations, publications, web, social media, and other forms of electronic communications, and internal communications. The Director of Communications is responsible for managing all staff members in this Division, setting priorities and direction for ABC communications, and achieving long-term communications goals.

 

This position requires significant abilities and experience in communications and management, preferably within the NGO community, a broad understanding of ABC’s mission and philosophies, and a clear vision for ABC’s future place in the public consciousness and compelling ideas on how to achieve it. Knowledge of current bird conservation issues in the Americas is strongly preferred.

 

Major Duties

 

• Coordinate and increase ABC outreach to U.S and international media outlets. This includes developing strategies and overseeing implementation of media and outreach campaigns in order to achieve the greatest media. • Manage and supervise staff in the Communications Division. Ensure all Communications Staff have appropriate and adequate training. • Create new and further develop existing strategies for expanding ABC communications to its members, other constituents, and the general public to maximize the organization’s public profile and recognition of its conservation achievements. • Oversee the timely production of ABC’s major publications (magazine, newsletter and annual report), including scheduling, content development, design, and distribution. • Oversee the management and development of ABC websites, including content, design, and navigation. • Coordinate integrated communications to ABC constituents in tandem with ongoing conservation campaigns and fundraising activities. • Oversee and further develop ABC’s social media campaigns. • Explore and enhance opportunities for collaborative communications outreach with other organizations. • Work with all divisions of ABC to enhance communications on ABC’s conservation work. • Oversee and enhance internal communication mechanisms within ABC. • Assist the Director of Membership in developing innovative ways of expanding ABC’s membership base. • Act as ABC spokesperson on ABC programs to the public, press, and peers in the conservation community. • Other duties as assigned.

 

Position Requirements

 

• An undergraduate degree in the biological sciences, English, or journalism, plus a Masters degree in communications/media relations or at least four years relevant communications experience or a combination of relevant education and experience. • Proven experience in managing a communications program for an NGO or equivalent, including planning, scheduling, budgeting, and evaluating program needs. • Proven experience and ability in communicating with the press. • Proven experience and ability in coordinating media campaigns. • Proven writing and editing experience, including feature articles. • An understanding of social media and electronic communications systems and how they can be used most effectively to reach a broad, targeted audience. • Must be an effective communicator, both written and oral, able to synthesize copious, complex, and diverse material into information that ABC constituents will find understandable, engaging, and compelling. • Ability to identify and act on useful outreach opportunities. • Experience managing publications to regular deadlines. • Energetic, entrepreneurial, creative, proven managerial experience, and well organized, with the ability to coordinate many tasks and responsibilities.

 

http://www.idealist.org/view/job/7cgxgkWjf2fP/

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2012 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

 

 

Posted in Main Page, Uncategorized, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for November 2012

 Your Very Next Step newsletter for November  2012
By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com
“The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.”

– Vincent Van Gogh

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

This issue comes to you from Doha, Qatar.

Subscribe for free. Send a blank email to:
yourverynextstep-subscribe@topica.com.

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 651 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our website (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel:

 

8-13 November                Doha, Qatar

13-16 November              Manama, Bahrain
*** In this issue:

***  I absolutely love this commercial for Norway’s Widerøe  airlines.

***  Get 10 Million Kids Outdoors! 

***  I’m in Qatar.  So, what to see?

***  Unlike some nearby kingdoms or emirates, this country calls itself the “State of Qatar.”

***  Have you seen the Lights?

***  Watch This Stunning Swiss Alps Time-Lapse, Then Visit the Summit Yourself

***  Here’s a story from AMC Outdoors that talks about my favorite place in the world…or at least one of them

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteers, High Sierra Volunteer Trail Crew, Clovis, CA

http://www.trailcrew.org/

 

2.)  Project Volunteer, NM Volunteers for the Outdoors, Albuquerque, NM (Projects throughout New Mexico)

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: October 2012
New York’s Erie Canalway Trail
*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Hut Master, Maine Huts & Trails, Kingfield, Maine

2.)  Projects Corpsmember, Mile High Youth Corps, Denver, Colorado

3.)  Staff Director, Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, Vienna, Virginia

4.)  Director, Deschutes Forest Conservation Assoc., Bend, OR

5.)  Outreach Coordinator, COLORADO TROUT UNLIMITED, Denver, CO

6.)  Executive Director, Point Reyes National Seashore Association, Point Reyes Station, CA

7.)  Communications Internship, The Wilderness Society, Washington, DC

8.)  Communications Internship, The Wilderness Society, Denver, CO

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  I absolutely love this commercial for Norway’s Widerøe  airlines.

http://www.jaunted.com/tag/travel%20advertising

 

***  Get 10 Million Kids Outdoors! 

 

Today, the amount of time kids spend outside is alarmingly low–only minutes per day–while screen time is at an all-time high (upwards of seven hours). NWF has set a new goal to stem the tide and move kids back outdoors. Our three-year goal is to get 10 million more American children out of the indoor habitat and into the great outdoors. This goal propels us toward a future when all kids spend time outside each day, creating a generation of happier, healthier children with more awareness and connection to the natural world. Visit www.nwf.org/10MillionKids

 

***  I’m in Qatar.  So, what to see?

 

Uma Thangaraj suggested the Souq Waqif, as recommended by Lonely Planet.  Alas, it was too far to walk from my hotel by the airport (not that I didn’t try).

 

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/qatar/doha/sights/market/souq-waqif

 

***  Unlike some nearby kingdoms or emirates, this country calls itself the “State of Qatar.”

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qatar

 

***  Have you seen the Lights?

 

Finnair blogs about the Aurora Borealis.  There’s also a cool time-lapse video from visitfinland.com.  Makes me want to go.

 

http://blogs.finnair.com/2012/11/08/have-you-seen-the-lights/

 

If you can’t get to Lapland, try this cool “laplication.”

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9N54n8nYA4E

 

***  Watch This Stunning Swiss Alps Time-Lapse, Then Visit the Summit Yourself

Ever flown into Switzerland’s Zurich Airport? You step off the plane and the soaring windows fill only with the expanse of blue sky all around. Then you step into the terminal transfer train and, in the darkness, there’s the sound of cows mooing, cow bells clanking and alpine horns tooting from the speakers.

The first bit of the video below instantly brought us back to that moment at Zurich Airport, as it also features that typical Swiss soundtrack…before jumping into a rhythm to compliment the stupendous vistas in the time-lapse.

This video. named “Helvetia’s Dream,” comes from Swiss photographer Alessandro Della Bella and is an ode to his homeland and the landscape in which he grew up. He obviously headed to the top of a few mountains for the shots, but we’re here to tell you that you can as well, and easily.

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2012/11/6/122632/216/travel/Watch+This+Stunning+Swiss+Alps+Time-Lapse%2C+Then+Visit+the+Summit+Yourself

 

***  Here’s a story from AMC Outdoors that talks about my favorite place in the world…or at least one of them:

 

Skiing Wild

 

Best routes for backcountry enthusiasts in and around the Pemi

 

By David Goodman

 

AMC Outdoors, November/December 2012

 

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/2012/features/skiing-wild-best-routes-around-pemi.cfm

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Volunteers, High Sierra Volunteer Trail Crew, Clovis, CA

http://www.trailcrew.org/

 

2.)  Project Volunteer, NM Volunteers for the Outdoors, Albuquerque, NM (Projects throughout New Mexico)

 

Project Volunteer: help with the physical aspects of building or improving a trail or public land area. No experience necessary.  All tools provided.

New Mexico Volunteers For The Outdoors

Post Office 36246

Albuquerque, NM 87176

 

http://nmvfo.org/volunteer

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: November 2012
Missouri’s Grant’s Trail

Only 10 miles from the famed Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Mo., fittingly lies Grant’s Trail. Like the arch, which was built as a monument to westward expansion, the trail follows a former rail line that set out with an ambitious goal to reach all the way to the Pacific Ocean. Even though the tracks never made it that far, the trail has preserved much of the corridor’s pioneering history and spirit.

While only eight miles long, the pathway has a lengthy list of unique sights, including Grant’s Farm, named for the 18th president and Civil War hero Ulysses S. Grant, who farmed in the area in the 1850s and hand-built the four-room log cabin called “Hardscrabble” that now sits on the property. Today, Grant’s Farm—the former estate of the Busch family of Anheuser-Busch brewing company fame—is an animal park featuring bison, elephants, camels, peacocks and more than 100 other species, including its most iconic residents, the Budweiser Clydesdales.

White Haven, another home owned by Grant, can be found on the other side of the trail across from Grant’s Farm. Before it belonged to Grant, White Haven was a slave plantation of the Dent family. That’s where Grant met his future wife, Julia Dent, and they later lived at the home for several years before the Civil War. The National Park Service now operates the historical site.

While at White Haven, Grant approved construction of the Pacific Railroad (later known as the Missouri Pacific Railroad) through his property. Ground was broken for the railway in 1851, and it was billed at the time as “The First Railroad West of the Mississippi.” Grant’s Trail is built on the former Kirkwood-Carondelet Branch of the rail line.

The town of Kirkwood, where Grant’s Trail now ends, was a planned community, established as soon as the railroad tracks reached it in 1853. It was named for the railroad’s chief engineer, James Pugh Kirkwood, and remnants of its historical roots can be seen in the town’s mid-to-late 19th century buildings, including the refurbished 1893 depot still in use today as an Amtrak train station.

An on-street connection, part of the Great Rivers Greenways’ Bike St. Louis project, takes travelers from the trailhead to downtown Kirkwood and the historical depot. In an effort to make the city more bicycle friendly, more than 80 miles of these signed on-street Bike St. Louis routes are available throughout the city.

By 1990, Missouri Pacific had ended service along its Kirkwood-Carondolet line, and the following year Trailnet purchased the rail corridor. Working with the St. Louis County Parks and Recreation Department (which currently maintains the trail), Trailnet—an organization that promotes active communities in the St. Louis region—opened the first section of Grant’s Trail, then known as the Carondelet Greenway Trail, in 1994. Great Rivers Greenway later took over the trail’s development and added two more miles (to reach its current length of eight miles) in 2006.

Now, with more than half a million visitors a year, Grant’s Trail has become an important recreational and regional connector. Part of this popularity is due to its easy access; the trail runs through several neighborhoods, often just behind people’s backyards. Other sections are more wooded with views of ponds, wetlands and Gravois Creek, which it parallels.

“Grant’s Trail is a rallying point. People have a sense of pride about it,” says Carey Bundy, project manager for the Great Rivers Greenway. “The trail stretches along five or six jurisdictions, and they all come together for this trail.”

Plans to extend the trail further are continuing. Nestled between the Meramec River to the west and the River des Peres to the east, Grant’s Trail plays an increasingly key link in the River Ring, a growing 600-mile network of interconnected trails and on-street bicycle routes throughout the St. Louis region. Presently, more than 100 miles of trail have been built in 17 of 45 planned greenway corridors.

“We’re in the design phase and have a conceptual alignment,” says Bundy of the upcoming Grant’s Trail connection to the River des Peres Greenway. “We’re going to have a public open house this November to get comments from users of the trail. In 2013, we’ll be getting the design finalized and should be able to start construction in 2014.”

The trail currently ends only a mile from the River des Peres Greenway, which, in turn, will one day reach the Mississippi River Greenway, a major component of the River Ring. Connecting all of these greenways is expected to make the trail even more popular.

“Grant’s Trail is very multi-use,” says Kevin Keach, project and operations manager for Trailnet. “You’ll see everything from cyclists to bladers to walkers and baby carriages; the whole gamut of users. Even people who were not for the trail originally, including some who worried that it would bring crime, now call it ‘their trail.'”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Hut Master, Maine Huts & Trails, Kingfield, Maine

 

Maine Huts & Trails requires volunteers to serve as backcountry hut caretakers during the self-service season.Caretakers live on site in staff quarters at the huts for two to twelve weeks. This is a unique opportunity to live rent-free and off-the-grid, with a recreational playground at your fingertips. Kayaking, canoeing, bicycling, hiking, and camping are all possible from the huts. Room and board are provided. Caretakers welcome and provide information to visitors, and must be attentive to the cleanliness and maintenance of the hut. The caretaker will ideally be an outgoing person who enjoys sustainable living and outdoor recreation and appreciates the Maine outdoors. Dates: November 1 to December 21.

 

Hut staff at Maine Huts & Trails work together with a small team to deliver backcountry hospitality and create memorable outdoor experiences. Interaction with hut staff is at the heart of the visitor experience.

 

The hut master oversees daily operations at the hut to assure high standards of customer service. In addition to performing all aspects of the hut crew position, the hut master is responsible for leading and motivating staff and volunteers, creating and implementing daily schedules, performing daily inspections to ensure that all public areas are clean, well maintained, and safe, finding solutions for guest complaints, managing inventories of supplies and merchandise, overseeing routine maintenance of the hut, and overseeing operation of green energy systems. Applicants should be personable, effective problem-solvers capable of maintaining high standards in an isolated environment. This position requires strong leadership skills and supervisory experience in a related work environment.

 

The winter season runs from December to April. Priority will be given to qualified candidates able to work the full season. On-site accommodation and food are provided for all positions. The standard schedule is 10 days on / 4 days off.

 

Applications are accepted at any time. Applicants should submit a completed application by email to employment@mainehuts.org, by fax to (207) 265-2209 or by mail to 375 Main St, Kingfield, Maine 04947.

 

http://www.mainehuts.org/jobs/

 

2.)  Projects Corpsmember, Mile High Youth Corps, Denver, Colorado

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=398700014

 

3.)  Staff Director, Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, Vienna, Virginia

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=25013

 

4.)  Director, Deschutes Forest Conservation Assoc., Bend, OR

 

The Deschutes Forest Conservation Association is a new organization created by Discover Your Northwest and the Deschutes National Forest. Based in Bend, OR DFCA is a subsidiary (dba) of Discover Your Northwest, a 503 (c)(3) non-profit organization which partners with public land agencies throughout the Northwest.

 

DFCA was created to further these goals:

 

1. Provide visitor service, interpretive programs and events to increase the number and diversity of visitors to Deschutes National Forest.

 

2. Increase funding to enhance the quality of the visitor’s experience.

 

3. Deepen the personal commitment and involvement of the local community through volunteerism.

 

4. Engage youth to reach the next generation of stewards through conservation education and career pathway programs.

 

Full job description can be found here:

 

http://www.idealist.org/view/job/Cthk5Nn8jb3p/

 

5.)  Outreach Coordinator, COLORADO TROUT UNLIMITED, Denver, CO

 

COLORADO TROUT UNLIMITED, a leading river conservation organization, seeks full-time Outreach Coordinator to strengthen and engage local TU chapters, grasstops and grassroots on issue campaigns. Email letter and resume by November 21 to dnickum@tu.org.

Colorado TU

1536 Wynkoop Street, Suite 100

Denver, CO 80202

Full description available at www.coloradotu.org.

 

6.)  Executive Director, Point Reyes National Seashore Association, Point Reyes Station, CA

 

About the Organization

 

Located 30 miles north of San Francisco, The Point Reyes National Seashore, 71,000 acres of forest, grassland, beaches, and protected bays, includes over 33,000 acres of dramatic coastline protected as wilderness. The Seashore is unique in providing wilderness so close to a major urban center.

 

The Point Reyes National Seashore Association (PRNSA) was founded in 1964 as a Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. We are the Cooperating Association for the National Seashore, supporting its efforts to protect endangered species, preserve and restore native habitat, and conserve cultural and historic legacies. Our mission is to encourage stewardship of the Seashore’s diverse resources through a variety of environmental education opportunities for all ages, especially those who otherwise might never have a wilderness experience. Our slogan is Explore Discover Connect.

 

Executive Director

 

PRNSA seeks an Executive Director with an outstanding track record in leadership and fundraising to extend our relationship with the National Park Service, build a strong relationship with staff and the Board, and manage a budget of at least $1M. The successful candidate will have a deep appreciation of both the Seashore and the National Park Service.

 

Primary Duties and Responsibilities

 

The Executive Director will perform the following and other duties as assigned:

•Leadership: Provide dynamic leadership for the PRNSA mission, strategy, core program areas, and operating departments according to policies set by the Board of Directors.

•Fundraising and Revenue Generation: Be the leader, working with the Seashore, our Board, and our Development Director to significantly increase fundraising revenue, effectively and enthusiastically communicate the case for supporting PRNSA’s programs and projects, identify new earned revenue sources, and ensure sufficient financial and staff resources are available to carry out the mission and goals identified in our strategic plan. A significant portion of the Executive Director’s time will be devoted to fundraising activities.

•Enhance Partnership with NPS: Build on the existing strong relationship with the NPS by meeting regularly with the Park Superintendent and senior staff to coordinate programs, solve problems, and design new initiatives, dedicating significant time as necessary to supporting and enhancing this relationship.

•Direct and Expand Core Programs: Work with our existing very capable staff to support and strengthen the Nature Science and Adventure camps, School Science Camp, Field Institute, book stores, and special park projects; collaborate with staff to identify and implement best practices and to evaluate outcomes; investigate and analyze opportunities to make our programs available to new constituencies.

•Sustain productive and mutually supportive relationship with Board of Directors: Provide the Board with all information and other resources available to conduct their work; promptly inform them of all issues and opportunities that may affect PRNSA; recommend appropriate courses of action; lead the strategic planning process.

•Staff Leadership: Lead and collaborate with a staff of nine, five of whom report directly to the Executive Director, while preserving the culture of mutual respect, individual initiative, collegiality, and diversity.

•Financial Oversight: Develop a proposed annual budget for Board approval; implement the budget; report performance results.

 

Qualifications

 

The successful applicant will have the following qualifications:

 

Required:

•Strong appreciation of and commitment to our National Parks

•Strong track record in and enthusiasm for fundraising and leading a major development effort

•Experience working with government agencies, including understanding NPS operations

•Leadership and management experience including nonprofit experience

•Excellent writing and public speaking skills

•Record of successful hiring, managing, and mentoring of staff

•Record of sound financial management

•Capability to work collaboratively with an experienced staff

•Proven ability to collaborate with diverse organizational partners, stakeholders, and personalities

•Bachelor of arts/science degree; postgraduate studies desirable

•Love of the outdoors, patience, flexibility, and the ability to inspire and motivate others

Desirable:

•Experience in natural resource conservation, environmental education, and/or historic preservation

•Belief that wilderness experience and environmental education change lives

•Understanding of relationships between NPS and Cooperating Associations

•Familiarity with Point Reyes area and adjacent communities

 

Compensation and Benefits

 

PRNSA offers a competitive salary commensurate with experience. Benefits include vacation and sick leave, Flexible Healthcare Spending Account, and 403(b) match. This position is located in Point Reyes Station, CA, thirty miles north of San Francisco.

 

To Apply

 

To be considered for this position, interested candidates must click “Apply” above to submit a resume, cover letter, and salary requirements. CEA Recruiting is assisting PRNSA with this search. Please direct all applications to CEA Recruiting. This position will remain open until filled.

 

The resume should include educational and work history, and references to articles or other publications, if any, authored by the applicant. The cover letter should succinctly describe the applicant’s goals, suitability for the position, salary requirements and other pertinent facts that may not appear in the resume. Principals only. No phone calls please. For more information about PRNSA, please go to www.ptreyes.org.

Point Reyes National Seashore Association is an equal opportunity employer.

 

CEA Recruiting works with leading environmental nonprofits, foundations, and businesses to recruit top talent and design effective organizational staffing strategies. For more information, visit www.cearecruiting.com.

 

http://www.ceaconsulting.com/what/position_details.aspx?client=CEA&jobId=209

 

7.)  Communications Internship, The Wilderness Society, Washington, DC

 

The Wilderness Society offers communications interns hands-on opportunities to strategize with policy staff, influence public opinion and protect America’s wild places.

 

Our interns roll up their sleeves to research critical environmental issues, craft press releases, author editorials and pitch both bloggers and traditional journalists. Students looking to burnish their public relations, writing and journalism skills will find our communications department to be a fast-paced, high-energy place where they can learn about the environmental community and how The Wilderness Society works to protect the country’s most important public lands and natural resources.

 

To apply, mail or email a resume, writing sample, and cover letter to:

 

Internship Coordinator

The Wilderness Society

1615 M Street, NW – Suite 100

Washington, DC 20036

Louise_Tucker@tws.org

 

http://wilderness.org/article/communications-internship-dc

 

8.)  Communications Internship, The Wilderness Society, Denver, CO

 

This position is unpaid, but is available for school credit.

 

The Wilderness Society recognizes the importance of nurturing a new generation of individuals who have a commitment to environmental causes and a passion for wilderness preservation. Our Internship Program is designed with that in mind. It provides rich, challenging learning opportunity for college students to work with professionals in The Society and contribute their talents and ideas to a variety of programs. The program allows interns to expand their knowledge of environmental issues, apply academic knowledge in a real life situation, and learn new skills, which will enhance future career options.

 

The Wilderness Society is currently seeking a communications intern (unpaid / school credit) in our Denver, CO office to support the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Action Center.

 

The Wilderness Society offers communications interns hands-on opportunities to strategize with policy staff, influence public opinion and protect America’s wild places. Our interns roll up their sleeves to research critical environmental issues, craft press releases, prepare multimedia material for the web, author editorials and pitch both bloggers and traditional journalists. Students looking to burnish their public relations, writing and journalism skills will find our communications department to be a fast-paced, high-energy place where they can learn about the environmental community and how The Wilderness Society works to protect the country’s most important public lands and natural resources.

 

About the position

•This position is unpaid, but qualifies for school credit.

•This position is open for fall of 2012.

•Student is expected to commit to 20-25 hours per week.

•Student is expected to complete those hours within traditional work hours and will be provided desk space in The Wilderness Society’s office.

 

How to apply

 

To apply, mail or email a resume, writing sample, and cover letter to:

 

Jennifer Dickson, Communications Manager

The Wilderness Society

1660 Wynkoop Suite 850

Denver, CO 80202

jennifer_dickson@tws.org

http://wilderness.org/article/communications-internship-denver

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2012 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

 

 

Posted in Main Page, Uncategorized, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for September 2012

 Your Very Next Step newsletter for September 2012
By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Either I conquer Istanbul, or Istanbul conquers me.”

– Sulten Mehmet the Conqueror

 

“A mind that is stretched by a new experience can never go back to its old dimensions. “

– Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

Where is Ned?  Istanbul, not Constantinople.

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

Subscribe for free. Send a blank email to:
yourverynextstep-subscribe@topica.com.

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 651 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our website (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel:

 

22-26 October – London, UK
*** In this issue:

***  Bill Ryerson visits Berundi:

 

*** Labor Day Fishing Trip to Land o Lakes Region of Ontario
***  Lampedusa and Eleonora’s Falcon.

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:
***  BACKCOUNTRY RANGER ASSISTANT (1-2 positions), SHUYAK ISLAND STATE PARK, Alaska

***  BACKCOUNTRY RANGER ASSISTANT (2 positions), NANCY LAKE STATE RECREATION AREA, Willow, Alaska

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: September 2012
Wisconsin’s Glacial Drumlin State Trail
*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Education and Communications Coordinator, Bluff Lake Nature Center, Denver, CO

2.)  Life Skills Worker – Adventure Based Activities Facilitator, Geo Abraxas Leadership Development Program, South Mountain, PA

3.)  Lead Instructor, Adventure Programs and Expeditions, Regional YMCA of Western Connecticut, Brookfield, CT

4.)  Seasonal Environmental Educator (Part-Time), Nature Center at Shaker Lakes, Shaker Heights, Ohio

5.)  Part-Time Instructor of Outdoor Leadership, Oregon Employment Department Bend, Or

6.)  Part-Time Instructors – Rock Climbing, Oregon Employment Department, Gresham, OR

8.)  Corporate Communications Coordinator, Vail Resorts, Inc., Broomfield, Colorado

9.)  Adventure Education Assistant, New Vision Wilderness, Brookfield, WI

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Where is Ned:  Akgün Istanbul Hotel.

 

***  My friend Bill Ryerson visits Berundi:

 

You will probably enjoy the following dispatch from Bill Ryerson, which recounts his recent adventures in Burundi. By the time you finish reading, you are likely appreciate the first sentence much more, as it indicates that, yes indeed, Bill met what Burundi had to offer him successfully. If you are curious, a few recent news items from Burundi follow his entry.

 

Greetings from Kigali, Rwanda.  I am just finishing a week of meetings in Burundi and Rwanda regarding new projects Population Media Center is planning.  I was accompanied on the visit to Burundi by Theo Nzeyimana, PMC’s Rwandese producer.

 

We arrived in Bujumbura late on Saturday night, September 1, in a pouring rainstorm.  I had flown from Lagos that day, and Theo joined me when I changed planes in Kigali [capital of Rwanda].  We arranged for a taxi to take us to the hotel.  When we got the bags loaded and got in the car, I noticed a strong smell of gasoline fumes.  The driver immediately lowered all the windows, so we could breathe, even if we were getting soaked by the rain.

 

As we left the airport grounds, I noticed the driver had no working windshield wipers and no defroster.  So through the pouring rain, he was creeping along wiping the fog off the inside of the windshield.  As we left the area that had streetlights, I noticed the taxi also had no headlights.  The driver struggled to stay on the road and to avoid oncoming vehicles.  Then in the middle of a swamp, the car stalled.  The driver opened the hood and moved some wires around and then asked Theo to push the car, while he tried to jump start it.  That did not work.  The driver then took a hammer to some part of the engine, and the dashboard lights came on.  Another push by Theo, and we were off to the hotel at 5 miles an hour.

 

We survived the taxi ride and after trying three rooms at the hotel to find one with a working air conditioner, I hit the hay at 1:30 am.  By this point, I was really missing Lagos.  Breakfast the next morning added fuel to the fire.  The waitress brought me a bowl of cornflakes.  When I poured milk on the cereal, I disturbed a cockroach that came scrambling out of the cereal.  I had the waitress take it away, which she promptly replaced with another bowl from the same box.  Since the second bowl appeared to have no inhabitants, I ate it as our 9:00 am meeting started.

 

The worst thing about the hotel was that I could not get an internet connection except at the open-air front desk, where in the evenings, I swatted mosquitos while checking emails.

 

On our final day, four days later, I showered by flashlight because no one at the hotel was awake early enough to notice that the power was out and start the generator.  When we left the hotel, check out took about half an hour, as the one person at the desk had to manually add up all the meal tickets and convert them to dollars.  Most of the way through this process, I noticed that the math did not seem to work and had him do it over.  Then I got my calculator and redid the math.  Indeed, his calculator was wrong.  He let us use his calculator (and we got the results he had gotten).  He then explained that his calculator did not always give the correct answer, because it had some “problem.”

 

***  Mat Matta goes fishing:

 

Ned,

 

Quick recap of my most recent trip……

 

Labor Day Fishing Trip to Land o Lakes Region of Ontario

 

Decided to head to Twin Oaks Lodge on Kashwakamak Lake in Fernleigh Ontario for a long weekend of fishing. My family has been visiting this fishing lodge for over 40 years but had never been there in September.  The area is called the Land O Lakes region and it is about 2 hours from Thousand Islands border crossing.

 

The weather is great in late August and September.  Warm with a cool breeze

during the day and cool at night.  Best part is the bugs are almost non-existent compared with June and July. The lake water was cool but warm enough for swimming and skiing or tubing.   Many of the lakes are connected so kayak and canoe trips via portage are popular.

 

We caught some real nice smallmouth bass in the 2-3 pound range.  Also caught some walleye and pike. The Lodge served all our meals in a main dining room and cooked our fish in a beer batter for lunch.

 

I highly recommend the Land O Lakes region for a family vacation.  There are not a lot distractions…it’s nature and you make it what you want.

 

***  Places I’ve been:

 

Lampedusa

 

I received this post from Dennis Bryant, and am posting this because it’s a place I’ve been.  I went there to visit the Loran C Station when Ernie Del Bueno was CO; once accompanying the chaplain from Signonella, getting there by means of a CH-53E Sea Stallion.  The second time in the company of the Consul General from Palermo, who flew from Sig aboard a T-39G to attend Ernies change of command.  I will add that Lampedusa is also a habitat for Eleonora’s Falcon.  How do I know this?  The Consul General went out into the scrub looking for them, so of course I went along and I have seen these rare falcons there. 

 

A small (seven square mile) rocky island, Lampedusa has been ruled by Italy since 1840. In ancient times, it served as a landing site for Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, and Arabs. Its lack of fresh water (except for rainfall) prevented it from becoming a permanent base, although the Romans did produce the fish sauce Garum there for a number of years. The Italians established a small penal colony on the island in the 1860s. During World War II, the small Italian force on Lampedusa surrendered to a landing party from the British destroyer HMS Lookout as Allied forces prepared to invade Sicily in June 1943. In 1972, when Colonel Gaddafi required closure of the US Coast Guard Loran Station in Libya, the station was relocated to Lampedusa. In 1979, Lieutenant Kay Hartzell, USCG, became the first female commanding officer of an isolated unit when she took command of the Loran Station. On 15 April 1986, when Lieutenant Ernest Del Bueno was commanding officer at the Loran Station, Colonel Gaddafi fired two Scud missiles at the facility in retaliation for the American bombing of Tripoli and Benghazi on 14-15 April (which was in retaliation for the bombing by Libyan agents of a discotheque in Berlin on 5 April). The Scuds missed, landing harmlessly in the Mediterranean. The Loran Station ceased transmitting at the end of 1994 and was decommissioned. In recent years, Lampedusa has become a prime destination for economic migrants from Africa seeking entry into Europe. The island has a permanent population of about 4,500 and the main occupations are fishing, agriculture, and tourism. The mild winters and sandy beaches attract a moderate number of visitors.

 

 

***  Can’t forget a face:

 

I admit it.  I am an aerosexual.  I like planes.  So this one I flew from Genoa, Italy to Istanbul, Turkey was especially cool.

 

Turkish Airlines (Istanbul) has repainted newly-delivered Boeing 737-8F2 TC-JHL (msn 40976) into a special “Globally Yours” livery which features 17,000 individual photos of current and former employees.

 

http://www.turkishairlines.com/en-int/corporate/press-room/press-releases/9680/turkish-airlines-rises-together-with-its-employees

 

Wishing to acknowledge the vital role its staff have played in the airline’s success, Turkish Airlines and project partner Boeing have prepared a surprise for its employees; a new Boeing 737-800 airplane (TC-JHL) decorated with roughly 17,000 photos of those working on behalf of Turkish Airlines in 191 destinations all over the world.

 

http://worldairlinenews.com/2012/03/17/turkish-airlines-introduces-its-new-globally-yours-boeing-737-800-logojet/

 

***  Having said that, being put on hold with THY while you listed to that “We are Turkish Airlines.  We are Globally Yours,” over and over and over….is pretty annoying.

 

***  Save time at the airport—apply for TSA expedited security screening.

 

I was checked in for my flight to Copenhagne when a TSA representative asked me if I was a frequesnt flier who flew frequently from IAD (Dulles).  He gave me a card and gave me a card and suggested I look into TSA’s PreChek program that would speed up the security screening process.  I later went to the TSA website on the card and started the application processs.  This took hours, as the screens kept timing out, or just failed and I had to start over again (not completly, as it kept data that had been saved).  At the end, I needed to pay $100.  Is it worth it?  Will it be worth it not to take off my shoes?  We’ll see.

 

This is what United sent me:

 

United is working with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to deliver TSA Pre✓TM, an expedited security screening program. This program, managed and operated by the TSA, continues to grow and is now available at multiple airports throughout the U.S. Apply today and you could move through security with greater efficiency and ease when flying on a domestic itinerary.

 

The TSA will determine your eligibility for expedited screening on a per-flight basis. If you are selected by the TSA, information embedded in the barcode of your boarding pass will inform the TSA agent at the designated security checkpoint to refer you to an assigned lane for expedited screening. In this special lane, you may no longer need to remove:

 

•             Shoes, belt or jacket

•             Liquids in 3-1-1 compliant bags from

carry-on luggage

•             Laptop from bag for separate screening

 

More information on this program is available on the United website.

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

BACKCOUNTRY RANGER ASSISTANT (1-2 positions), SHUYAK ISLAND STATE PARK, Alaska

 

This remote wilderness park, 54 air miles north of Kodiak, is accessible only by boat or plane. The park/island is 11 miles in diameter, and is comprised of 49,000 acres of coastal rain forest and numerous protected bays and inlets. Favorite recreation activities include sea kayaking, boating, wildlife viewing, fishing, and hunting. The park is home to the majestic Kodiak brown bear, Sitka black-tailed deer, silver salmon, many bird species, and a great diversity of marine mammals. Park facilities include four public use cabins available for rent to visitors and the new Big Bay Rangers Station/Visitor Center. Shuyak Island is subject to the wet, windy, and unpredictable weather of the Gulf of Alaska and Shelikof Strait. Rainfall averages approximately 70 inches per year.

 

Main Tasks: Maintenance of 4 public use cabins including cutting and hauling firewood, keeping cabins stocked with propane, and cleaning cabins. Maintain park vessels and ranger station /visitor center grounds. Monitor patterns of park use and make visitor contacts. Trail work to include portage and hiking trail improvements. Light construction. Assist with park logistics and supply. Occasionally assist park ranger with park patrol.

 

Required Skills: Backcountry hiking, camping and survival skills. Physically able to lift and carry up to 50lb. loads over uneven terrain.  Possess basic carpentry skills and knowledge of related tools.  Two years of undergraduate studies in a natural resource field.  Ability and desire to live in remote location in bear country for extended periods of time. Must be of good temperament and have ability to get along well with others in close living quarters. Good communication skills and ability to work independently.

 

Desired Skills: Experience in chainsaw use and maintenance. Trail construction and boat operation.

 

Internship: Will assist volunteer in internship requirements and paperwork.

 

Allowance/Housing: Housing will be in backcountry cabins or tents with no running water or electricity. All food, safety equipment, and some training will be provided. Travel to and from Shuyak Island will be provided. Candidates must find their own way to Kodiak.

 

Time Commitment: Three months, at least June l – September l. As long as May 25 – September 30.

 

Note: Include a resume with application. Ranger is on seasonal leave till March. Volunteer will not be selected until the ranger returns to work.

 

Send Application to:

 

Thomas Anthony

Alaska State Parks – Kodiak

1400 Abercrombie Dr.

Kodiak, AK 99615

phone: (907) 486-6339

fax: (907) 486-3320

email: dnr.pkskodiak@alaska.gov

http://camping.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=camping&cdn=travel&tm=76&gps=101_7_1342_467&f=20&tt=14&bt=1&bts=1&zu=http%3A//www.dnr.state.ak.us/parks/vip/indexcws.htm

 

BACKCOUNTRY RANGER ASSISTANT (2 positions), NANCY LAKE STATE RECREATION AREA, Willow, Alaska

 

Nancy Lake State Recreation Area is located in Southcentral Alaska, 67 miles north of Anchorage, in the community of Willow, with a population of over 1,600. Situated on the east side of the broad Susitna River Valley, Nancy Lake SRA has the typical geography formed by the retreat of large glaciers – forested, rolling hills of glacial moraines and countless lakes, ponds, and streams. This recreation area is well known for its canoe trail system and public use cabins. The 22,685 acre park is home to moose, beaver, fox, black bear, waterfowl and many other wildlife species. Summer recreation activities include canoeing, camping, hiking, and fishing. One backcountry host position is located at Red Shirt Lake, the other at Butterfly Lake.

 

Main Tasks: Maintain public use cabins and backcountry campsites. Contact backcountry visitors and private property owners. Collect visitor use and resource data. Summer access to these lakes is by hiking trail, canoe trail, or floatplane.

 

Special Projects: Monitor backcountry visitor use; serve as the emergency contact for backcountry users. Volunteers will perform routine maintenance of public use cabins and assist other staff with trail projects as needed. They will also serve as a contact for the private property owners in the area.

 

Required Skills: Public relations skills, canoe/small boat experience, light maintenance skills, and the ability to work independently. Applicants must be able to live in a primitive setting.

 

Desired Skills: Education/experience in resource and/or recreation management, carpentry skills, and ability/experience using hand and power tools. Due to the remote nature of these assignments, couples are encouraged to apply.

 

Internship: Will assist volunteer in internship requirements and paperwork.

 

Allowance/Housing: Housing will be in a cabin without running water or electricity. A small motorboat and/or canoe will be provided. A monthly subsistence payment is available with a 60-day commitment to the positions. Radio and cell phone communication is provided. Use of Nancy Lake Office facilities and front country bunk space provided.

 

Time Commitment: Minimum of two months (sixty days), June 15-August 15. Positions can remain open as long as May 15 to September 30 unless weather or other events prohibit longer durations.

 

Note: Application must include resume. Applications are excepted until March 15.

 

Send Application to:

 

Alaska State Parks – Mat-Su/CB

7278 E. Bogard Rd

Wasilla, AK 99654

 

phone: (907) 495-6210 or 745-3975

fax: (907) 495-6671 or 745-0938

 

or

 

Ranger John Wilber

P.O. Box 10

Willow, AK 99688

 

email: john wilber@alaska.gov

 

http://camping.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=camping&cdn=travel&tm=76&gps=101_7_1342_467&f=20&tt=14&bt=1&bts=1&zu=http%3A//www.dnr.state.ak.us/parks/vip/indexcws.htm

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: September 2012
Wisconsin’s Glacial Drumlin State Trail

Wisconsin’s 52-mile Glacial Drumlin State Trail follows the corridor of a former passenger railroad that some speculate was built by the Chicago and Northwestern Railway purely for political convenience. Completed in 1882, the Milwaukee and Madison Air Line provided a straight shot through rural countryside and several small communities to connect two of the state’s most important cities—but very little in-between.

“In Wisconsin, the bulk of the population was in Milwaukee, but Madison was the capital,” says Jim White, president of the Friends of the Glacial Drumlin State Trail. “The railroad was built to provide good transportation between the two cities, so legislators would choose to ride on it and support the railroads.”

But even if the line made good political sense on paper, laying the track itself proved far trickier. Though it provided a direct link between the two urban centers, the route happened to traverse a glacial swamp, and many of the wood pilings would sink into the ground. Along one especially hazardous passage, the ground was so unreliable that a guard had to be placed there to warn oncoming trains of the danger at all hours. One train, which didn’t heed the warning to slow down, tumbled off the track and sank into the muck, where it remains today.

Even with these logistical hitches, the line eventually opened to great fanfare, according to a Milwaukee Sentinel article from the time: “The run between Madison and this city was a most eventful one, and the train was received at every station by crowds of enthusiastic people. At Waukesha, the enthusiasm was most marked, nearly one-half of the population of the village turning out to greet the arrival of the train.”

Today, Waukesha, on the outskirts of Milwaukee, is the eastern terminus of the trail—and also home to one of its most popular sections. Unlike the crushed-limestone surface along most of the route, the 13-mile section between Waukesha and Dousman is paved. It’s a favorite training spot for White, who competes in inline-skating marathons. “It’s the perfect compromise between not too crowded and not too remote,” he says.

The trail is well-used by cyclists and walkers, but its popularity doesn’t slow in winter. You’ll find snowshoers and cross-country skiers all along the route in the colder months, as well as snowmobilers on the unpaved portions. Animals are abundant, too. Blue herons, sandhill cranes and other water birds frequent the trail’s many ponds, rivers and marshes, and wild turkeys, eagles, deer, foxes, rabbits, badgers and chipmunks can often be seen.

“You don’t feel that you’re in the city anymore,” says Brett Johanen, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) property manager for the eastern half of the trail. “Within five to 10 minutes of your ride, you’re out in the country.”

The only slightly unpleasant spot on the trail is a 1.5-mile on-road gap by Highway 26 in Jefferson, where signs direct travelers along a two-lane road that is often busy with trucks thundering back and forth to an ethanol plant. This detour will eventually be remedied, though, by construction of a new off-road, crushed-limestone replacement. Construction is expected to begin within three years.

“We just purchased a majority of the property,” says Lance Stock, the DNR property manager for the western half of the trail. “That was a section we really needed to get. We want to keep trail users off the roads and onto a safe corridor.”

Another new addition has also recently seen positive movement. On its western end, the trail terminates at Cottage Grove. From here, it would be a short hop—less than 15 miles—for the trail to reach farther west to Madison, and plans are now in the works to do so. The Wisconsin DNR recently acquired the land for this section of the corridor from GE Healthcare.

“Within the next five years, we’ll have the missing link developed,” says Stock. “It just takes a while to get the funding in place to do the work.”

As exciting as the future additions are, the current route offers plenty of intrigue. About 15 miles east of Cottage Grove lies the Zeloski Marsh, a beautiful wetland habitat popular for birding. In these peaceful surroundings, typical of much of the trail, you’d never guess that this ground was once a dangerous place. From the 1830s to 1850s, a notorious family of thieves consisting of Moses Finch and his 12 sons and five daughters—all wickedly expert with pistol and rifle—used the nearly impenetrable swamp as a hideout for stolen horses and cattle.

Also nearby is the Lake Mills Depot, which serves as a DNR office, visitor center and nature center. As rental bicycles and trail passes are available here, it’s good place to begin your journey. The restored depot, which dates back to 1895, offers interesting exhibits on the trail’s development and railroad history.

Last year, the state trail—one of 41 in Wisconsin—celebrated its 25th anniversary. For a rail line with somewhat impractical roots, the Glacial Drumlin has certainly justified its construction in this second life as a rail-trail.

“This is the third state trail I’ve worked on and my favorite,” Stock says affectionately. “It goes through some nice communities, where people treat the trail like an extension of their property.”

 

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Education and Communications Coordinator, Bluff Lake Nature Center, Denver, CO

 

Bluff Lake Nature Center (BLNC) is a growing nonprofit agency that owns and manages a unique urban wildlife refuge and outdoor classroom in northeast Denver. The refuge is home to an abundance of animals and native plants, which thrive in a variety of habitats. Serving nearly 5,000 elementary school students each year, many of them from high-poverty schools, BLNC brings the outdoor environment and environmental science into the lives of underserved students. BLNC works to preserve and restore our 123-acre wildlife refuge, enhancing native habitat along a critical urban riparian corridor. The site is also used as an urban oasis by many visitors from the general public.

 

The ECC will primarily work to maintain and strengthen our current programs, such as our signature school field trip programs, summer camps, and other public outreach programming. ECC will also spend approximately 5 hours per week on organizational communications, and 5 hours per week on developing and implementing earned income opportunities.

 

Specific tasks:

1) Work with Education Director to ensure successful school field trips, summer camps, and other camps by addressing the educational content and logistics of the programs; promote the programs; conducting pre-field trip school visits; managing program reservations; staffing the programs; working with volunteers; and managing and analyzing field trip assessments.

2) Work with Education Director to develop new programs that target more intensive study opportunities than current programs, or that can be used in new organizational environments

3) Work with Education Director to recruit, train, manage, reward, and retain volunteers.

4) Work with Education Director and other BLNC staff to promote, set up, staff, and manage volunteers at other BLNC programming and special events.

5) Work with Education Director to staff outreach booths and attend environmental education events and meetings.

6) Serve as the point person for the design, creation, and/or management of BLNC’s various online–and some offline–communications vehicles, including our website, e-newsletter, social media pages, and print collateral.

7) Work with the ED and Education Director to brainstorm and implement promising, mission-oriented, and generally profitable earned income opportunities.

8) Other tasks and special projects as required.

 

This position is part-time, 35 hours per week initially, somewhat flexible hours. Looking to grow position to full-time in the next year.

 

Qualifications:

Committed to land conservation, science education

Min. 2 yrs. environmental education success

Communications, marketing skills: written and oral, incl. history of teaching, public speaking, and understanding effective online communications, website maintenance

Organized, detail-oriented

Bachelor’s in relevant field

Success generating earned income opportunities or business experience

Successful volunteer recruitment

Print collateral design and creation

 

Interested applicants: please email letter of interest, resume, at least three references, and salary requirements to Jeff Lamontagne, Executive Director, Bluff Lake Nature Center. All applications and inquiries via email please: jlamontagne@blufflake.org. Please, no calls.

 

jlamontagne@blufflake.org

http://andrewhudsonsjobslist.com/index.cfm?PID=805&ID=8559,29011,0&S=iloktioruwr#j3

 

2.)  Life Skills Worker – Adventure Based Activities Facilitator, Geo Abraxas Leadership Development Program, South Mountain, PA

http://www.simplyhired.com/job-id/wozfnasnef/life-skills-jobs/

 

3.)  Lead Instructor, Adventure Programs and Expeditions, Regional YMCA of Western Connecticut, Brookfield, CT

http://regionalymca.applicantpro.com/jobs/4422-4687.html

 

4.)  Seasonal Environmental Educator (Part-Time), Nature Center at Shaker Lakes, Shaker Heights, Ohio

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=391600006

 

5.)  Part-Time Instructor of Outdoor Leadership, Oregon Employment Department Bend, Or

http://www.emp.state.or.us/jobs/index.cfm?location_content=jobdisplay.cfm,&agency_menu=N&ord=871236

 

6.)  Part-Time Instructors – Rock Climbing, Oregon Employment Department, Gresham, OR

http://www.emp.state.or.us/jobs/index.cfm?location_content=jobdisplay.cfm&agency_menu=N&ord=862164

 

7,)  Rock Climbing Instructor, Life Time Fitness, Lakeville, MN

http://jobs.lifetimefitness.com/job/Lakeville-Rock-Climbing-Instructor-Job-MN-55044/2091940/

 

8.)  Corporate Communications Coordinator, Vail Resorts, Inc., Broomfield, Colorado

 

The corporate headquarters for Vail Resorts, Inc, the leading mountain resort operator in the US, is located in Broomfield, Colorado.  We operate the world-class mountain resort properties of Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge and Keystone mountain resorts in Colorado, and the Heavenly Ski Resort, Kirkwood Mountain Resort and Northstar-at-Tahoe Resort in the Lake Tahoe area of California and Nevada, and the Grand Teton Lodge Company in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.  We also operate Vail Resorts Hospitality and RockResorts, a luxury resort property and hotel company, featuring casually elegant properties co-located with our mountain destinations as well as in the Caribbean. Vail Resorts Development Company is the real estate planning, development and construction subsidiary of Vail Resorts, Inc.

 

The Corporate Communications Coordinator supports the Corporate Communications Team in the areas of internal communications, public relations  and social media by performing administrative duties, writing company announcements, assembling e-newsletters, pitching stories, coordinating events, organizing files and databases, managing and contributing to social communities, and assisting with media hosting.

 

Responsibilities:

•             Compile, edit and design a weekly e-newsletter for employees

•             Draft employee emails, FAQs, talking points, etc.

•             Edit written communications with close attention to detail

•             Assist with drafting press materials such as news releases, media alerts and pitches

•             Write and create content for social communities including Buzz and Facebook

•             Create, update and manage media lists and editorial calendars

•             Cultivate relationships with business stakeholders and media

•             Coordinate media itineraries

•             Update website content

•             Assist with special event planning

•             Coordinate media monitoring, analysis and research

•             Research employee communications trends and best practices

•             Assist with development of videos and presentations

•             Track PR results and create dashboard reports

 

Requirements:

•             Bachelors Degree, preferably in Journalism, Communications or English

•             2 years of experience in communications role, including writing and social media experience

•             Demonstrated resourcefulness and effectiveness in roles

•             Microsoft Office including PowerPoint, Web CMS (content management systems), Photoshop or other photo editing programs, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram

•             A propensity toward learning more technologies

•             Demonstrated strong verbal and written communication

•             Ability to build internal and external relationships

•             Good eye for detail in editing written communications

•             Ability to write from various points of view and voices

 

Preferred skills:

•             Basic graphic design

•             Experience or knowledge about internal communications, public relations and social media

•             Familiarity with travel industry

•             Exposure to working with human resources

 

Have fun.  Serve Others.  Do Right.  Drive Values.  Do Good.  Be Safe.  These are the values Vail Resorts employees embrace daily.   As the premier mountain resort company in the world and a leader in luxury, destination-based travel at iconic locations, we operate in three highly integrated and interdependent segments including mountain, lodging and real estate.  Vail Resorts employees are good at what they do and we welcome people who bring enthusiasm, pride and a commitment to creating an Experience of a Lifetime to our stakeholders.

 

Vail Resorts is an Equal Opportunity Employer

 

https://performancemanager4.successfactors.com/career?company=Vail&career_job_req_id=10082&career_ns=job_listing

 

9.)  Adventure Education Assistant, New Vision Wilderness, Brookfield, WI

https://gethired.com/apply/2867c10c-051d-41d9-830e-4cc63fdae28f?rcid=shs

 

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2012 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

 

 

Posted in Main Page, Uncategorized, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | 1 Comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for April 2012

Your Very Next Step newsletter for April 2012

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“I think that travel comes from some deep urge to see the world, like
the urge that brings up a worm in an Irish bog to see the moon when it
is full.”
~ Lord Dunsany

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a
cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged
to participate. Share your adventures with the network today! Send to
lundquist989@cs.com.

Subscribe for free. Send a blank email to:
yourverynextstep-subscribe@topica.com.

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to
lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 653 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

You may note that our website (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a
make-over. Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

Note: Watch for Jaunted’s Travel Cat of the week this Wednesday,
featuruing Ned’s photo of the Cat of the Ascension.

*** In this issue:

*** Travel news

*** 10 of the world’s strangest conventions
*** Pets Can Be Jetsetters Too
*** Rails-to-Trails Conservancy
*** Beef…or pasta…or curry…or…chicken tandoori…or…
*** If you live in Virginia, you live in bear country
*** National Train Day Comes But Once a Year
*** Slacker’s Guide to Gardening for Wildlife
*** Namibia: The African Experience

*** Trail / Outdoor / Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.) Volunteer positions, CONSERVATION WORK ON WILDLIFE PROJECTS &
RESERVES IN SOUTHERN AFRICA, Enkosini Eco Experience, Lydenburg 1120,
South Africa

2.) Building Boardwalks for Twin Arches, Big South Fork River and
Recreation Area, Twin Arches Bottom Loop, Tennessee

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: April 2012
Connecticut’s Farmington Canal Heritage Trail

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.) President, Mass Audubon, Boston, Massachusetts

2.) Executive Director, South Shore Natural Science Center, Norwell,
Massachusetts

3.) Public Affairs Specialist, Forest Service, Department Of
Agriculture, Sandy, Oregon

4.) Environmental Restoration Crew Member, California Trout, Antelope
Valley, California

5.) Director of Programs & Outreach, Orange County Conservation Corps,
Anaheim, California

6.) Park Ranger (LE/Pilot), US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department Of
The Interior, Galena, AK

7.) Executive Director, Western New York Land Conservancy, Wales, New
York

8.) Biological Aid/Technician (Wildlife), Bureau of Land Management,
Department Of The Interior, MANY vacancy(s): North Bend, OR; Grants
Pass, OR; Carlsbad, NM; Rock Springs, WY; Tillamook, OR

9.) Another Fishing Job for Bass Masters Everywhere, Escanaba, MI

10.) Eagle Education Coordinator, Ketchikan Indian Community,
Ketchikan, AK

11.) Development Director, HawkWatch International, Salt Lake City, UT

12.) Canoe Livery Attendant II, City of Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on
the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

*** Here’s the YVNS Travel News for April:

*** Here are 10 of the world’s strangest conventions from Oddee.com.

1. Fur-Con
A furry convention (also furry-con or fur-con) is a formal gathering of
members of furry fandom — people who are interested in the concept of
fictional non-human characters with human characteristics.

2. Redhead Day
Every summer in the city of Breda in The Netherlands, thousands of
redheads gather for a free festival to celebrate having naturally red
hair.

3. High Times Cannabis Club
2012 marks the 24th year for the annual High Times magazine event, The
High Times Cannabis Cup. Held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, every
November.

4. TattooFest
TattooFest is an annual convention held in Tampa Bay, Florida, every
spring.

5. Sideshow Convention
Every year in Wilkes-Barre, PA the world’s only sideshow convention is
held.

6. Parkes Elvis Festival
At the Parkes Elvis Festival in Australia, the King is alive and well!
Well, not really; but Elvis Presley’s memory and music live on at this
annual event held in early January each year.

7. Official Twilight Conventions
The Twilight movies and the books they are based upon, written by
Stephenie Meyer, are a huge cultural phenomenon worthy of not just one,
but several official conventions. Thousands of fans gather for the
conventions, and stars of the movies, as well as Meyer herself.

8. LEGO World
Every Autumn in IJsselhallen-Zwolle, The Netherlands, over 20,000 people
of all ages gather to celebrate and play with LEGO toys.

9. Lebowski Fest
Lebowski Fest is a gathering of fans of the cult film/pop culture
phenomenon, The Big Lebowski. The festival has been held for ten years
in as many cities, and The Dude himself (actor Jeff Bridges) attended
the Los Angeles Lebowski Fest in 2005.

10. ‘The Office’ Convention
Scranton, PA is the city in which the Emmy Award-winning TV show The
Office is based, which is why it became the unlikely location of a
yearly convention.

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/10-More-of-the-Strangest-Conventions/?cid=eltrMtgNews

*** Fur-st Class:

Pets Can Be Jetsetters Too
Deals, Enhanced Service, & More

Alaska Airlines loves all its customers, especially the furry ones. And
with our PetStreak® Animal Express program your four-legged flyers will
love us, too – as they experience our
Fur-st Class® Care. We’ve even partnered with Banfield® Pet Hospital to
help travelers prepare their pets for stress-free travel as well as
enjoy valuable discounts. Whether you are traveling with your pet or
sending them along without you, rest easy knowing they’re traveling in
style.

http://www.alaskaair.com/content/cargo/petstreak.aspx?wc_mid=1506%3A16599%3AWHA_IN_20120410_4_Else&wc_rid=1-5RI0W8P&wc_lid=Greeter_||20120409_AW||

*** Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

When you support TrailLink.com and Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC)
today, we’ll send you a free Mid-Atlantic guidebook or one of the other
five regional guides.

https://secure2.convio.net/rtt/site/Donation2?3280.donation=form1&idb=1236489046&df_id=3280&JServSessionIdr004=zb27sjij01.app202a

*** Beef…or pasta…or curry…or…chicken tandoori…or…

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2012/4/9/123648/0516/travel/AirAsia%27s+Incredibly+Long+List+of+Onboard+Meals

(Ned flew Air Asia when he went to Malaysia for dinner last year.)

*** If you live in Virginia, you live in bear country

Things to Remember in Bear Country

“If the bear enters the tent fight back and yell. Many bears have been
driven off this way.” Want to learn more?

http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/bear/things-to-remember-in-bear-country.asp

Yes, Virginia, you’ll have to bear with us

Black Bear (Ursus americanus) Facts

Of the three bear species (black, brown, and polar bears) in North
America, only the black bear lives in Virginia. Shy and secretive, the
sighting of a bear is a rare treat for most Virginians. However, bears
are found throughout most of the Commonwealth, and encounters between
bears and people are increasing. A basic understanding of bear biology
and implementing a few preventative measures will go a long way to
helping make all encounters with bears positive.

Physical Description

Adult black bears are approximately 4 to 7 feet from nose to tail, and
two to three feet high at the withers. Males are larger than females.
Black bears have small eyes, rounded ears, a long snout, large non
retractable claws, a large body, a short tail, and shaggy hair. In
Virginia most black bears are true black in color unlike black bears
found in more western states that can be shades of red, brown or blond.

Depending on the time of year, adult female black bears commonly weigh
between 90 to 250 pounds. Males commonly weigh between 130 to 500
pounds. The largest known wild black bear was from North Carolina and
weighed 880 pounds. The heaviest known female weighed 520 pounds from
northeastern Minnesota.

Distribution

The American black bear is found only in North America. Black bears
historically ranged over most of the forested regions of North America,
and significant portions of northern Mexico. There are approximately
900,000 black bears in North America. Black bears reside in every
province in Canada except for Prince Edward Isle, and in at least 40 of
the 50 states in the US. In the eastern United States, black bear range
is continuous throughout New England but becomes increasingly fragmented
from the mid-Atlantic down through the Southeast.

Longevity

Bears may live up to 30 years in the wild. The oldest documented wild
bear in Virginia was 26 years of age when it was killed.

Solitary or Social?

Black bears are generally solitary, except sows caring for cubs. Adult
bears may be seen together during the summer breeding period and
occasionally yearling siblings will remain together for a period of
time. Bears may also gather at places with abundant food sources.

Daily Activity Time

Black bears are typically crepuscular (active at dusk and dawn), but can
be active any time of day.

Movements

Female black bears have smaller home ranges (1 to 50 square miles) than
males (10 to 290 square miles). A male’s home range may overlap several
female home ranges. Bears may move further in times of less food like
early spring. Dispersing yearlings, especially males, looking for new
home ranges may also travel a great distance.

Breeding and Cubs

Female black bears mature as early as three years old. Breeding occurs
from mid-June to mid-July, but in the eastern deciduous forest, mating
season can extend into August. Female black bears usually breed every
other year and cubs are born from early January to mid-February weighing
½ to ¾ lbs. Anywhere from 1-4 cubs are born at a time and are raised by
their mother for about 1½ years. First-year cub mortality rates are
about 20%, primarily due to predation (foxes, coyotes, dogs, bobcats,
other bears) or abandonment by their mother. Adult bears do not have
natural predators except humans.

When the mother is ready to breed again, she will send her yearlings to
fend for themselves during the summer months when food is usually
abundant. Always hungry, these yearling bears, particularly the males,
will seek easy sources of food. The ability to access human related food
sources can spell trouble for these bears.

Denning

Bears may feed up to 20 hours per day, accumulating fat (energy) prior
to winter denning. An adult male can gain over 100 pounds in a few weeks
when acorn production is heavy. Depending on weather and food
conditions, black bears enter their winter dens between October and
January. Bears will not eat, drink, urinate or defecate while denning.
Bears are easily aroused and may be active during warm winter days. They
emerge from their dens from mid-March to early May. In Virginia, most
bears den in large, hollow trees. Other den types include fallen trees,
rock cavities, and brush piles in timber cut areas, open ground nests,
and man-made structures (culvert pipe).

Foods

Black bears have a very diverse diet. They consume herbaceous plant
parts, woody plant parts, flower/nectar/ pollen, fruit, terrestrial
insects, juvenile and small mammals, juvenile and adult amphibians, and
carrion. Bears are omnivorous and opportunistic feeders, eating mostly
plants in the spring, berries and insects in the summer, and nuts and
berries in the fall. Carrion (dead animals) is often a part of a bear’s
diet. Although not typically and an active predator, rare occurrences of
livestock predation is reported each year.

Spring Foods
•Grasses/Forbes
•Insects/Larvae
•Skunk Cabbage
•Squaw Root

Summer/Fall Foods
•Berries
•Hard mast (Acorns, Other tree nuts)
•Autumn Olive
•Dogwood
•Wild Grapes
•Serviceberry
•Mountain-ash
•Hawthorn
•Chokecherry
•Pokeberry
•Sassafras

Bears on the Move—You Live in Bear Country

As new spring growth emerges, so do bears, and they are following their
stomachs in search of food.

With a healthy and growing black bear population, bear sightings are
becoming the norm throughout Virginia. While the highest concentration
of bears occurs in the Blue Ridge and Alleghany Mountains and around the
Great Dismal Swamp, bears are likely to be seen just about anywhere in
Virginia. During the months of April and May bears have left their dens
and are ending their winter fast. Bears do not eat, drink, urinate, or
defecate while they are in dens. Additionally, while denning, female
bears may give birth to cubs. Cubs are born weighing less than a pound
and are reliant on their mother’s milk.

In Virginia, bear diets consist of 80% vegetation and only 20% protein
from common sources like insects and carrion. Bears are highly adaptable
and intelligent animals and can learn to associate human dwellings with
food. In their search for food, bears are attracted to residential areas
by the smell of food around homes. The most common food attractants are
bird feeders, garbage, and pet food. Additionally outdoor grills,
livestock food, compost, fruit trees, and beehives can also attract
bears.

How do you encourage a bear that’s hanging around to move on?

The best way to encourage a bear to move on is to remove the food source
that is attracting it. Do not store household trash, or anything that
smells like food, in vehicles, on porches or decks. Keep your full or
empty trash containers secured in a garage, shed or basement. Take your
garbage to the dump frequently, and if you have a trash collection
service, put your trash out the morning of the pickup, not the night
before. Take down your birdfeeder temporarily until the bear moves on.
Consider installing electric fencing, an inexpensive and extremely
efficient proven deterrent to bears, around dumpsters, gardens,
beehives, or other potential food sources.

If addressed quickly, wildlife problems caused by food attractants in
people’s yards can be resolved almost immediately. After you remove the
food source on or around your property, the bear may remain for a short
time, but after a few failed attempts to find food, it will leave your
property.

What should you do if you see a bear on your property?

Bears generally avoid humans, but in their search for food, they may
wander into suburban areas. So, what should you do if you see a bear?
The most important response is to keep a respectful distance. Black
bears have a natural distrust of humans, and in most cases would rather
flee than have an encounter with people. If a bear is up a tree on or
near your property, give it space. Do not approach or gather around the
base of the tree. By bringing your pets inside and leaving the immediate
area, you give the bear a clear path to leave your property.

If you see a bear cub in an area do not try to remove it from the area
or “save it”. Female bears will wander to find food usually with her
cubs in tow. If she feels nervous she will typically send her cubs up a
tree and can leave the area. The mother bear will leave the cubs there
until she returns and calls for them. Bear cubs left where they are will
almost always be retrieved by their mother as long as there are no
people or pets around.

Please don’t feed the bears.

Always remember that a bear is a wild animal, and that it is detrimental
to the bear, as well as illegal in Virginia, to feed a bear under any
circumstances. Even the inadvertent feeding of bears is illegal.

You can help manage the Commonwealth’s black bear population by keeping
your property clear of attractants and communicating with your neighbors
to resolve community bear concerns. If you visit outdoor recreation
areas in bear country insist that the area supervisors manage their
trash properly.

If you do see a bear in your area, enjoy watching it from a distance. If
you experience a bear problem after taking appropriate steps of
prevention, please notify your Virginia Department of Game and Inland
Fisheries Regional Office. Phone numbers for the regional offices can be
found by visiting the office locator.

How can I learn more about bears in Virginia?

Living with Bears in Virginia, a video produced by the Virginia
Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, provides tips for peacefully
coexisting with bears. Please visit the Department’s black bear website
to view the video, print a brochure, read more about bears in Virginia,
and view other useful links to bear information.

Remember, if you live in Virginia, you live in bear country.

Things to Remember in Bear Country

If You Encounter a Bear at Home:

There are no definite rules about what to do if you meet a bear. In
almost all cases, the bear will detect you first and leave the area.
Unprovoked bear attacks are very rare, and have never been documented in
Virginia. If you do meet a bear here are some suggestions:
•Stay calm. If you see a bear and it has not seen you, calmly leave the
area. As you move away, make noise to let the bear discover your
presence.
•Stop. Back away slowly while facing the bear.
•Give the bear plenty of room to escape. Bears rarely attack people
unless they feel cornered or provoked.
•Do not run or make any sudden movements. Running could prompt the bear
to give chase, and you cannot outrun a bear. If on a trail, step off the
trail and slowly leave the area.
•If there is a bear in your yard and it approaches you, make yourself
look big and make loud noises. Remain at a safe distance and throw rocks
to make the bear feel unwelcome.
•If there is a bear in your house prop open all doors to the outside and
get out of the way of the exit. Never close a bear into a room. Make
noises and yell at bear to leave the house. Don’t approach the bear but
make sure it knows it is violating your territory.
•If you surprise a bear speak softly. This may reassure the bear that
you mean it no harm.
•Fight back. If a black bear attacks you, fight back. Black bears have
been driven away when people have fought back with rocks, sticks,
binoculars and even their bare hands.

If You Encounter a Bear While Camping:
•Do not store food, garbage, or toiletries in your tent!
•Keep your camp clean.
•Store your food safely. Use bear-proof containers. Metal ammunition
cans ($10-20) and Bear Canisters (approximately $50-60) are easily
packed and transported.
•Keep your tent and sleeping bag free of all food smells.
•Store the clothes you wore while cooking or eating with your food.
•Burn all grease off grills and camp stoves.
•Wipe table and clean eating area thoroughly.
•Store food and coolers suspended from a tree at least 10 feet off the
ground and four feet out from the tree trunk.
•Dispose of garbage properly. Secure it with your food and then pack it
out.
•Do not burn or bury the garbage.
•Sleep away from food areas. Move some distance away from your cooking
area or food-storage site.
•Store toiletries with your food; the smell of toiletries may attract
bears.

Scents and use of perfume or cologne is sometimes an attractant to
bears.

A Bear Outside Your Tent:

If you hear a bear or other animal outside your tent make sure it is
aware that there is a human inside by using a firm monotone voice. Turn
on a flashlight or lantern. If the bear enters the tent fight back and
yell. Many bears have been driven off this way.

If You Encounter a Bear While Hiking:
•Hiking at dawn or dusk may increase your chances of meeting a bear.
•Use extra caution in places where hearing or visibility is limited,
such as brushy areas, near streams, where trails round a bend and on
windy days.
•Reduce your chances of surprising a bear on the trail by making noise,
talking or singing.
•Make sure children are close to you or within your sight at all times.
•Leave your dog at home or have it on a leash.

*** National Train Day Comes But Once a Year

From Jaunted: Look, train travel is great. We regularly hop Amtrak, VIA
Rail Canada and various lines elsewhere in the world, but just about the
last thing we equate riding the rails with is Rosario Dawson.

This year, Amtrak is celebrating the 5th annual National Train Day on
May 12 and though it doesn’t mean any discounts on summer train travel
(yet! fingers crossed!), it does mean that Dawson will be at New York
Penn Station to talk about her love of trains. WEIRD.
While specific activities around National Train Day haven’t been
announced, the party will go down at train stations in Philadelphia,
Chicago, Los Angeles and, of course, NYC. Essentially, this serves as a
notice that it could be very fun to travel on Amtrak from one of these
stations on May 12…not so much because of Rosario, but because there
are bound to be giveaways and little bonuses.
[Photo: Jaunted}

*** Slacker’s Guide to Gardening for Wildlife

from Wildlife Promise

“Animals are such agreeable friends – they ask no questions, they pass
no criticisms.” ~George Eliot

You’ll never see my garden in the pages of Better Homes and Gardens. I’m
just not that ambitious. But, this doesn’t seem to faze the critters in
my neighborhood that frequently pay me a visit. To them, my unkempt
backyard is a little oasis complete with food, clean water and plenty of
places to hide out.

That’s right. You can attract the sweetest-sounding songbirds and most
vibrant butterflies to your backyard even if you’re a lazy gardener like
me. With a little up-front effort now, you can sit back and enjoy your
wildlife haven all year long. Just follow these simple guidelines:

Go native in a big way: Native plants are fantastic at attracting birds
and butterflies and generally require less fertilizer and less water.
That means less work for you. To find carefree natives for your
landscape, visit the American Beauties Native Plant Finder.

Don’t be stingy with the mulch: Mulch helps keep water in the soil and
available to your plants, thus cutting down on the need for manual
watering. Plus, when mulch breaks down, it provides nutrients to the
soil, which can help reduce or eliminate the need for additional
fertilizers. Moreover, if your mulch is the proper thickness, you could
also cut down on weeding.

Say “so long” to your lawn: Grass lawns often require chemicals and
frequent mowing. Moreover, they provide little value for wildlife. So,
by replacing some or all of your high maintenance grass lawn with native
wildflowers, bushes, and trees, you’ll be providing the food and shelter
that local critters need to survive and thrive. And, to avoid any
misunderstandings with your neighbors about natural landscapes and their
benefits, download this handy guide to neighbor-friendly wildlife
gardening.

Keep the deadwood: You can create a refuge for hundreds of woodland
creatures by not removing dead trees from your yard. Many animals,
including birds, bats, squirrels and raccoons make nests in hollow
cavities and crevices in standing deadwood. Make sure that upright dead
trees called “snags” don’t pose a threat to your home or a neighbor’s.

Let the kids help: Little hands can really come in handy in the
garden–from helping to create a brush pile for small mammals to filling
birdfeeders. For older children, give them a small garden plot to plant
natives and call their own. Visit 16 Tips for Wildlife Gardening with
Kids for more ideas.

http://blog.nwf.org/2012/04/slackers-guide-to-gardening-for-wildlife/?s_email_id=20120421_BOT_ENG_Newsletter_April_Edition|STBot

*** Namibia: The African Experience – By Brian Kilgallen

The flight from Germany, to Namibia in southwest Africa was long –
the longest I had taken in the same time zone. We boarded in late
afternoon and flew directly south over Italy, Libya, Chad, Daiquiri,
Boogaloo, D’Isenteri and Drambui, finally arriving in Johannesburg,
South Africa, the following morning. After a two-hour layover, I was on
another plane for the final leg west over the Kalahari Desert in
Botswana to Windhoek, the capital of Namibia. It was nearly one o’clock
in the afternoon – 18 hours after I had set out.

As the plane made its approach, I tried to catch a glimpse of
Windhoek, but there wasn’t a building in sight except for the small,
rather unpretentious airport. The landscape was sparse and looked
remarkably like the desert southwest in the United States. It could
have been El Paso, southern New Mexico or Arizona except for the
Kalahari baboons scrambling along the two-lane road into town, which was
roughly 30 lonely miles from the terminal.

I asked the driver why they built the airport so far from
civilization.
“The ground was flat there,” he said.
“That’s it?”
He shrugged.

I checked into the Windhoek Country Club Resort where I met some
acquaintances I hadn’t seen in a few years. Later that night, the hotel
bused us into town to Joe’s Beerhouse. The name itself had a certain
manly earthiness appeal and it did not disappoint. It’s what most people
imagine when they think of Africa – a sprawling, simple, yet intimate
setting under the stars Thatched candlelit dining areas bordered the
perimeter. It was bench seating, with maybe ten people to a table. I
ordered a beer and checked out the menu. Most of the group had decided
on skewered zebra, ostrich, wildebeest and crocodile over rice. I opted
for the same. I would be eating a lot of game during the next week.
Contrary to the rumor, the crocodile did not taste like chicken and had
the consistency of a Goodyear tire. I did not order it again.
It was spring in the southern hemisphere and it was hot. Death
Valley hot. But the heat was dry from the low humidity and the constant
breezes helped to make it more comfortable than bearable. The night was
cooler and the air fresh.

“Interesting sky,” I said to the woman across from me. Her name was
Doris and she was German. She had been working in the area for about ten
years.

She nodded. “We have different constellations in this hemisphere.
The Southern Cross, Ungowa the Warrior, Silvia the Hairdresser, Stanley
the Plumber….”

While the crime rate is relatively high, as it is in most African
metropolitan areas, Windhoek is regarded as one of the cleanest cities
in sub Sahara Africa, testament to the Europeans in general and the
Germans in particular, who had settled what was then West South Africa.
Some of the locals claim the tap water is actually purer than the
bottled variety.

Colonized in the 1884 by Germany, Namibia today is a hodgepodge of
cultures – Dutch, British, German and others. But the German influence
is the strongest and it was the Germans who built the railroad there in
the early 1900s. Vehicles drive on the left. Most Namibians speak
English, German or Afrikaans. And, the influence of the Bushman is
everywhere, particularly in the primitive artwork.

The following day, I set out to explore Windhoek. It was mid
morning and the temperatures, while still comfortable, were already
building toward the heat of the day. Namibia’s capital is small and
spread out like Albuquerque across the high desert sands, with the
downtown area clustered into maybe eight or ten square blocks with
high-rise buildings. The street vendors were already setting up on the
sidewalks and in the pedestrian shopping areas. The quality of their
wares was surprisingly good and while many of the better shops carried
similar items, the best bargains were to be had in the streets.

There were two main areas for outdoor shopping in the town. I began
with the larger one, which was spread out across the pedestrian shopping
mall. The vendors had laid out their goods on the sidewalks in what must
have been a daily ritual, first unpacking them from the large cardboard
boxes and then arranging the items uniformly row after row. Most were
objects d’art, carved from wood or semi-precious stone. Masks, letter
openers, wildlife, necklaces, earrings, T-shirts, baskets, bracelets,
fertility symbols, pottery, trinkets.

Some of my friends and I had apprenticed in haggling when we
visited the souks in Morocco and Tunisia in my salad days and was
confident that I could hold my own with the street vendors.

I stopped at the first stall and flashed a friendly smile at the
tall, wiry native. “Hakuna m’tata,” I said.
He didn’t smile back. Most of the Namibians I met were virtually
expressionless and yet always seemed to comprehend. You would order a
meal in a restaurant and wonder if they were actually going to bring it
to you, but they always did. Waiters are like that.

He scowled at me. “What you want to buy?”

I pointed. “I’d like to look at that.”

He picked his way through the display and held up a carved ebony
map of Africa. “This?”

“Yes. How much?”

He made his way back and offered it to me for examination. “Two
hundred dollar, Namibian.” It was the equivalent of about 25 U.S.
dollars.

“That’s seems high,” I said.

“Make me an offer.”

“One hundred.”

He snatched the carving back from me. “It cost me 140 dollar.”

I produced a 100 dollar bill and offered it to him.

“One hundred forty dollar,” he said. “You want it?”

I held steady. “One hundred. Here, take it.”

He put the carving down. “Get out of my space.”

“One hundred ten.”

“Go!” He followed that with a string of what I assumed were vulgar
obscenities in a language I was not familiar with.

I moved on to the other outdoor shopping area near the office of
tourism at the intersection of Independence Boulevard and Fidel Castro
Street. Many of the items were similar to those I had seen before. I
hefted a malachite elephant, held it up to catch the glint of green in
the sunlight, then turned it over to see the price. Eight hundred
(Namibian) dollars!

“You like?” She was a bruiser with arms as thick as a rhinoceros’
neck, complexion of rich, dark mahogany and short tightly curled hair of
steel wool.

“It’s very expensive.”

“Make me an offer.” She had a voice that could strip paint off a
garage door from twenty paces.
I put it down and started to move on.

“How much you want to pay?”

“I want to look some more.”

She dogged me to the next stall. I reached down and picked up a
carved oblong mask that had been rubbed smooth to a lustrous sheen.
Again I looked at the price. Seven hundred dollars.

“How much you want to pay for that?” she said.

“The price is high.”

“Make me an offer. How much? Five hundred dollars?

“I just want to look around,” I said.

“Three hundred?”

“Please…”

She was in my face now, clutching my arm. “Pay me something!
Anything!” Then her voice became a desperate plea. “I need your
support…!”

I gave her 900 dollars. The mask is hanging in my study.

Of course, no visit to the region would be complete without a
safari and the Okapuka and Duesternbrook game preserves were only about
two hours away, off the TransKalahari Highway that linked Windhoek to
Botswana in the east and South Africa to the south. The bus from the
hotel lobby arrived at the lodge where we enjoyed a buffet lunch before
heading out in the Humvees to the bush where we spent an afternoon
observing and photographing game.

“Do you think we’ll spot any cheetahs?” I asked our guide.

“No. They already have spots,” he deadpanned.

“Okay. Do you think we’ll SEE any cheetahs?”

“Unlikely. They run very fast.”

I let that go by. “So, what can we expect today?”

“Giraffes, rhinos, warthogs, crocodiles, springboks, apes and…
yors.

“Yors?”

“Yes.”

I looked at him quizzically. “What’s yors?”

“Thank you. I’ll have another beer.”

Except for the streets named after revolutionaries like Castro, Che
Guevera, and Nelson Mandela, Namibia today bears almost none of the
scars of 25 years of armed conflict that led to independence from South
Africa in 1990, the result of a tripartite agreement among South Africa,
Angola and Cuba, with the Soviet Union and the United States as
observers. The country today is thriving as a popular tourist
destination and for me it was truly one of the great experiences of a
lifetime.

City park in Windhoek

Street market in Winhoek town center

Sign in a bar in downtown Windhoek pretty much says it all

On safari at the Okapuka game preserve north of Windhoek

Springbok in the wild

Close encounter with the Rhinos

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.) Volunteer positions, CONSERVATION WORK ON WILDLIFE PROJECTS &
RESERVES IN SOUTHERN AFRICA, Enkosini Eco Experience, Lydenburg 1120,
South Africa

Enkosini Eco Experience offers self-funding volunteers a unique
opportunity to work abroad at leading wildlife conservation,
rehabilitation and research programs in South Africa and Namibia.

A wildlife conservation program is the ultimate life changing and
rewarding experience. Volunteer programs range from 1-12 weeks, giving
volunteers the opportunity to become involved in a wide variety of
wildlife conservation activities in Africa; including anti-poaching,
wildlife research, animal rehabilitation and reintroduction, hands on
animal care, game tracking and capture, bush rehabilitation and everyday
reserve maintenance and management. Volunteers can choose to focus
exclusively on one program, or alternatively experience a number of
different programs. All of our conservation projects have a strong
element of continuity. The work of one volunteer is carried on by
subsequent volunteers and, collectively, the Enkosini Eco Experience
network makes a lasting impact on local communities, wildlife and
wildlands of South Africa and Namibia.

Founded in 2003, Enkosini Eco Experience allows you to volunteer in a
way that fills your heart, mind and spirit and maximizes your financial
contribution to the projects you choose. Enkosini’s carefully selected
projects are our colleagues, our mentors, our partners. A tight-knit
community in South Africa and Namibia, we work together to achieve
higher standards in conservation and to fight unethical wildlife
activities through advocacy, media exposure and legislative change.
Enkosini Eco Experience supports our partner wildlife projects with the
necessary financial and volunteer assistance required to achieve our
goals in conservation and community development in Africa.

The staff of Enkosini Eco Experience has traveled extensively through
South Africa and Namibia – teaching, working, volunteering, studying,
backpacking, and managing tour groups. Our knowledge and understanding
of where to go, when to go, what to do and how to do it will prepare you
for traveling abroad to Southern Africa. You‘ll enjoy Enkosini’s
complete support before, during and after your volunteer experience
including emergency phone lines, in the field coordinators, full
training where required, independent Africa travel advice, and most
importantly a team with the experience to answer all your questions. We
are well-informed about local issues and culture, and help ensure that
all the organizational details for your volunteer project are covered so
that your experience is safe, enjoyable and fulfilling.

Our overseas volunteers come from all walks of life – from gap year
students to career breakers to retired people – and we organize
volunteer programs for people of all nationalities. Whether you are
burned out from running the rat race, exploring a new direction in your
life or just aching to see the world, an Enkosini Eco Experience is an
absolute must for anyone who is enthusiastic about wildlife conservation
and the environment. Enkosini’s range of volunteer projects offer the
adventurous individual the chance to take part in valuable and rewarding
hands-on conservation work that provides a sustainable future for
important ecosystems in South Africa and Namibia. And, of course,
Southern Africa is a great place to volunteer with magnificent scenery,
fabulous weather, great infrastructure, fascinating cultures and, last
but not least, spectacular wildlife!

Let the adventure to Africa begin…

To contact our South African office:

Enkosini Eco Experience

P.O. Box 1197, Lydenburg 1120, South Africa

Tel: +27.82.442.6773, Skype: enkosini

E-mail: info@enkosini.com / enkosini@yahoo.com

(*please send all correspondence to both email addresses*)

To contact our US office:

Enkosini Eco Experience

P.O. Box 15355, Seattle, WA 98115, USA

Tel: +1.206.604.2664, Fax: +1.310.359.0269, Skype: enkosini

E-mail: info@enkosini.com / enkosini@yahoo.com

(*please send all correspondence to both email addresses*)

http://www.enkosiniecoexperience.com/?gclid=CN_OhJ_7uK8CFUbe4AodcQIgiA

2.) Building Boardwalks for Twin Arches, Big South Fork River and
Recreation Area, Twin Arches Bottom Loop, Tennessee

Accommodations Description: Volunteers will be staying at primitive tent
sites. Volunteers should bring their own tent, sleeping bag, pad, eating
utensils/bowl, and personal gear.

Project Information: Volunteers will build boardwalks on a very heavily
used trail leading to the Twin Arches, the most impressive rock arches
in the eastern United States. The site is closed to car access and
should provide an exciting outdoor experience for all involved.
Volunteers will work side by side with the NPS trail crew who will
provide support and guidance onsite.

Area Description: Located in a rugged gorge area of the Cumberland
Plateau, the Big South Fork of the Cumberland River and its main
tributaries attract fishermen, swimmers, and paddlers. The park offers
almost 400 miles of hiking and multi-use trails. The area is home to
several arches, beautiful overlooks, wildflowers, and geological
wonders.

Climate Information: Expect warm, humid days, and cool evenings. During
the summer there can be the occasional thunderstorm, which brings with
it high winds, hail and lightening.

Travel Information: No airport pickup provided. Closest airport is
Knoxville McGhee Tyson Airport.

Maximum # of Volunteers: 15

http://www.americanhiking.org/ProjectRegistrationDetail.aspx?projectId=586

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: April 2012
Connecticut’s Farmington Canal Heritage Trail
When it comes to layers of history, few pathways can top the Farmington
Canal Heritage Trail. This central Connecticut corridor started life as
a waterway, then turned into a railroad, then became a multi-use trail.
Lately, it’s become a crucial link in an ambitious 3,000-mile greenway
from Florida to Maine.

“There’s so much history and heritage—it went through three modes of
transportation,” says Steve Mitchell, owner of a trailside business and
board member of the East Coast Greenway Alliance, the group promoting
the Florida-to-Maine pathway.

Many trails have a lengthy backstory, but few tales are as long and as
varied as that of the Farmington Canal trail. It started in the 1820s,
when a group of businessmen in New Haven joined together to build a
canal north through the Farmington Valley and into Northampton, Mass.,
to facilitate trade. The canal was completed in 1835, but the advent of
the steam locomotive quickly spelled the waterway’s doom. By 1850 most
of the right-of-way was laid with tracks for the New Haven and
Northampton Company railroad, also known as the “Canal Line.”

The railroad operated for more than 130 years, under various owners.
Generations of residents watched trains come and go on this line,
including the 54-year-old Mitchell, who remembers seeing them passing
through town and behind the lot of his family’s car dealership in
Simsbury, Conn., when he was a boy. By the 1980s, though, service over
most of this rail line ended. Work on converting the unused sections
into rail-trails began in the early 1990s, spurred on by funding
provided by the federal Transportation Enhancements program.

The first sections of the trail opened in 1993. Mitchell remembers
taking his family out on one of these sections not long afterward—his
first ride on a rail-trail. “It was absolutely wonderful—you didn’t have
to worry about cars or trucks,” he recalls. From that point, he was
hooked on rail-trails.

The trail extended in segments over the years as access and funding
became available. When the pathway came through Simsbury, Mitchell’s
family provided access to the section of the railroad corridor that it
had previously leased from the state to use as an employee parking lot,
keeping the trail route continuous.

Today, about 42 miles of the 56-mile route through Connecticut are
complete. (Another 25 miles of the corridor in Massachusetts, starting
with the Southwick Rail Trail at the Connecticut border, are in various
stages of development.) Mitchell estimates that it will take another
three to five years to complete the trail. Trail builders have been
careful to preserve the corridor’s history, protecting one of the last
remaining canal locks and creating a museum beside it in the town of
Cheshire, for example.

Even though it’s still a work in progress, the greenway has proven to be
enormously popular. More than 154,000 people used the section of trail
near Simsbury in 2008, according to the Farmington Valley Trails Council
(FVTC). The pathway provides not only health and recreational benefits
for users, but an alternative commuting option for residents. It
generates an estimated $4 million to $7 million a year for the regional
economy. Perhaps equally important, the Farmington canal trail has
helped to catalyze an alternative transportation movement both on the
local and state levels.

“It’s fun to see what a difference [the trail] has made in our community
in terms of encouraging biking, and making people feel safe on
bicycles,” says Mitchell.

Adds FVTC president Bruce Donald, “After 20 years of work, we finally
are bringing to fruition a point-to-point alternative transportation
corridor that is not just a fantastic regional amenity, but a useful
harbinger of the steadily increasing value of people-powered travel.”

The FVTC, a citizens’ group formed in 1992 to support rail-trail
development in the area, now has more than 1,600 members, according to
Donald. These volunteers have played a crucial role not only in creating
and promoting the trail, but maintaining it. For example, when a major
snowstorm crippled New England last October and brought down hundreds of
trees and thousands of branches on the trail, dozens of members of the
trails council swarmed over the trail like worker bees and cleaned away
the debris—in some cases, before power to their homes had even been
restored.

These trail advocates have also been a powerful voice in support of
bicycle and pedestrian issues across the state. In an acknowledgement of
the importance of this constituency and recognition of the crucial role
of multi-modal transportation, Connecticut Gov. Dan Malloy last year
created and filled the state’s first-ever full-time position for a
bicycle-pedestrian coordinator.

Malloy has also provided funds for a feasibility study for a bike path
running parallel to southwestern Connecticut’s Merritt Parkway—a path
that could ultimately connect to the Farmington Canal trail and provide
another important link in the East Coast Greenway.

The East Coast Greenway would connect Key West, Fla., to Calais, Maine,
linking 26 major cities along the way and providing new, non-motorized
recreational and commuting options to millions of Americans. Nearly 200
miles of the proposed greenway would go through Connecticut, including
the section of the Farmington Canal trail from New Haven to Simsbury.
About 25 percent of the greenway is complete, and Donald, Mitchell and
others from Connecticut are using their experiences on the Farmington
Canal trail to help move the interstate project forward. “We have a
symbiotic and complementary existence,” Donald says of the greenway
group.

Sounds like the makings of another engrossing chapter in the history of
the Farmington Canal Heritage Trail.

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.) President, Mass Audubon, Boston, Massachusetts

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=23905

2.) Executive Director, South Shore Natural Science Center, Norwell,
Massachusetts

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=23902

3.) Public Affairs Specialist, Forest Service, Department Of
Agriculture, Sandy, Oregon

http://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/314571900

4.) Environmental Restoration Crew Member, California Trout, Antelope
Valley, California

California Trout and California Department of Fish & Game are now
looking for candidates interested in conducting restoration work in the
Eastern Sierra for endangered Lahontan cutthroat trout. Remaining Walker
Basin Lahontan cutthroat trout currently persist in a handful of
headwater streams. This recovery project is aimed at increasing
available habitat within their historic range, securing recovery waters
from invasives, and monitoring native population.

The eastern Sierra is an area of extreme elevations, extreme
temperatures, and volatile weather. Access to the remote restoration
sites can be rigorous—with personal and work gear being hauled in the
heat on your back! It can be a very physically strenuous job, including
removal of non-native fish (i.e. electroshock killing). This can be
upsetting for some people, so please consider this carefully!

Duties:

The person(s) selected will work as part of a crew on ecological
restoration projects under the direction of DFG and California Trout
staff. Restoration for Lahontan cutthroat trout will utilize a
combination of backpack electroshocking to remove non-native brook trout
and temporary barrier placement to secure recovery waters. Other duties
will include: pruning riparian vegetation to facilitate crew access to
the stream; maintenance of gear; and data management. Although outdoors,
surrounded by amazing vistas and working with an amazingly beautiful
native trout, the work can be tiring and repetitious.

Minimum requirements:

Candidates must have at least two years of college level education with
at least 10 credits of science.
Candidates should be able to carry an approx. 40 pound backpack while
hiking at elevation.
Candidates must be comfortable in and around water.
After the initial training, candidates must be able to work without
direct supervision.

Details:

Flexible work week: although this job is based on a 40 hour work week,
it can be arranged to fit your schedule. For example, four x 10 hour
days followed by three days off.
Compensation: Crew members will be paid $12 to $14 per hour. In addition
dormitory-style housing may be provided in Coleville, CA for the field
season.
Vacancies: Four currently. There may be up to eight, contingent upon
funding.
Where: Antelope Valley, CA.
When: Field work will commence June/early July, depending on stream
flows, and proceed through September. Note: students unable to commit
for the entire may apply but preference may be given to applicants
willing and able to work through the duration of the field season.
Application Instructions

To apply:

Send a cover letter, resume and short writing sample to: Michael Robin
(mrobin@caltrout.org).
Please CC: Dawne Becker (dbecker@dfg.ca.gov) and Mark Drew
(mdrew@caltrout.org).

Applications are due on or before April 6th, 2012. Please include in the
subject line of your email: Your Name – LCT Walker Restoration

For more information about California Trout, visit our website at
www.caltrout.org. To learn more about California DFG, visit
www.dfg.ca.gov.

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=309700039

5.) Director of Programs & Outreach, Orange County Conservation Corps,
Anaheim, California

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=23810

6.) Park Ranger (LE/Pilot), US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department Of
The Interior, Galena, AK

http://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/314306500

7.) Executive Director, Western New York Land Conservancy, Wales, New
York

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=23919

8.) Biological Aid/Technician (Wildlife), Bureau of Land Management,
Department Of The Interior, MANY vacancy(s) – North Bend, ORView Map
MANY vacancy(s) – Grants Pass, OR; Carlsbad, NM; Rock Springs, WY;
Tillamook, OR

http://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/307298800

*** From Mark Sofman:

9.) Another Fishing Job for Bass Masters Everywhere, Escanaba, MI

http://bit.ly/GQxRn1

10.) Eagle Education Coordinator, Ketchikan Indian Community,
Ketchikan, AK

http://bit.ly/GQhMxu

11.) Development Director, HawkWatch International, Salt Lake City, UT

http://bit.ly/GQhV48

12.) Canoe Livery Attendant II, City of Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI

http://bit.ly/GQvqkp

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to
lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2012 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

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