Your Very Next Step newsletter for January 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for January 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

Isoja kaloja kannattaa pyytää vaikkei saisikaan.”

(Translation: Big fish are worth of fishing even if you don’t catch one.)

- Yhdistys Fyysikkoseurs,

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

***  This edition of YVNS comes to you from Helsinki, Finland.

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Ned’s upcoming travel:

***  Feeling insecure: Pre-Checked?  Pre-Rejected?

***  Ned’s January trip tp Sweden by way of Austria:

***  I love Kayak.  So does mother.

***  Norweigian airlines

***  World’s Best Hikes: 20 Dream Trails

***  Value of Frequent-Flyer Miles Will Soon Drop for Delta and United Travelers

***  Check out these amazing hotels

***  Confessions of Hotel Housekeepers

***  Fodor’s Travel Names Top Destinations for 2014

***  Condé Nast’s GOLD LIST 2014

***  Lonely Planet’s top destinations for 2014

***  Virginia’s Acorn Crop Very Light This Year

***  Learn to Handle Back Country Emergencies

***  Video Interlude: Take a Few Minutes to Fly with Air Tahiti Nui

***  Which perk is morer important?  Mini-bar or Free Wi-Fi?

***  A cave is just a hole sitting on its side

***  Time to start planning summer expeditions

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

 

 

Trail of the Month: January 2014

Florida’s Blountstown Greenway Bike Path

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Osprey Watcher, The Center for Conservation Biology, Williamsburg, VA (various locations)

2.)  Internships, The Center for Conservation Biology, Williamsburg, VA

3.)  Volunteer, The Nature Conservancy, Arkansas

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Manager, Corporate Marketing Partnerships, The Nature Conservancy, Washington, DC

2.)  Office Manager (Part-Time), Golden Gate Audubon Society, Berkeley, California

3.)  Lead Burn Crew Member, The Nature Conservancy, Lexington, Kentucky

4.)  Chapter Liaison and Communications Assistant, Cheetah Conservation Fund, Alexandria, VA

5.)  Communications Coordinator, Oregon Wild, Portland, Oregon

6.)  Habitat Restoration Coordinator/Project Manager, The Freshwater Trust, Portland, Oregon

7.)  Snowmaking Supervisor, Seven Springs Mountain Resort, Seven Springs, PA

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel:

 

January 18-25, 2014 — Stockholm ; Karlskrona, Linkoping, Gothenberg, Sweden.

 

January 25-28, 2014 — Helsinki, Finland

 

January 28 – February 1, 2014 — Portsmouth, UK

 

March 17 – 20, 2014 — Accra, Ghana

 

March 24 –  28, 2014 — Monetery, Calif.

 

June 2 – 4, 2014 — Abu Dhabi, UAE

 

***  Feeling insecure: Pre-Checked?  Pre-Rejected?

 

Thanksgiving holiday…went to Baltimore (BWI) airport. Two security people standing at the entry to the security line waved me off to a new security line (security area C), saying that I had been pre-cleared by TSA for expedited screening, meaning I didn’t have to remove my laptop or take my shoes off. I looked at my boarding pass, printed at the office, and could see nothing special that indicated pre-clearance. But no one else was at security C, the security agent stamped an X in a circle on my boarding pass and I zoomed through.

 

On the way BACK to Baltimore, I printed my boarding pass at the airport. It clearly said TSA PRE at the top. I had to go through the regular line with all the other people.

 

This makes no sense, being backwards of what should have happened. I have no idea why the TSA selected me and then rejected me.

 

I have NOT paid the $100 fee to TSA for pre screening, had an interview, etc.

Anyone else have this experience?

 

Sue Bumpous

 

***  Ned’s January trip tp Sweden by way of Austria:

 

(Written before departure) – My upcoming trip to Sweden has been booked (not by me) on Austrian, with a five hour layover at Vienna.  I’ve done a little research on line and I can’t say the majority of reviews about Austrian and thweir lounge at Vienna are great.  Even thiough I have Star Alliance Gold / United MileagePlus Premier Platinum status, I can’t reserve a seat without paying (more than $100 for an exit row window), until 36 hours before departure.  But Austrian is a new carrier for me, and Vienna will be a new airpot.  So watch for my review in an upcoming issue of YVNS.

 

As an aside, I will also be flying two flights on Norweigian and one on SAS on this trip, and returning from London on United.

 

Apart from the Norwegian miles, I’ll accumulate some miles on my UA MileagePlus account.  But new rules on United make it much more difficult to earn Priemier qualifying milede.  There ‘s a minimum dollar amount you have to spend, and tickerts must be written by UA.  This makes it doubly and triply difficult to attain elite staus starting in 2014.

 

Since USAirways is now American, Washington Reagan National goesa from being a Star Alliance hub to a One World hub.  I fly a lot of flights on US, but book my miles on UIA.  Time for a new strategy.

 

***  I love Kayak.  So does mother.

 

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2014/1/22/65517/6651/travel/New+Kayak+Ad+Deemed+Offensive+and+Insensitive+and+Reprehe…Yawn

 

***  Norweigian airlines is all the good things a low cost carrier should be (cheap, efficient), and apparently none of the really bad things it could be (arogrant, rude).  I flew from Stockholm to Helsinki, a one hour flight, and paid extra for two bags and seat selection ($11 for the exit row window).  The plane-a new and spacious 737-was half full, so I would have been able to sit in a window seat if i picked my seat at checkin. Norweigian touts themselves as being the “greenist” fleet in Europe, partly because its planes and thus its engines are newer and more fuel efficient.  You pay for drinks and snacks, so I declined to buy a cup of coffee, but the flight was not long.

 

Because I originally thought I was going to have just one bag, I had to purchase an additional “bag” at the airport the night before my flight (if it was 24 hours

 

before the flight I could have done so online and saved some money, but it wasn’t much to begin with).  Armed with my voucher, I had now problems checking two bags the next morning.  Airport checkin and security were pretty standard.  I wasn’t running late, so no pressure, and I seated myself at the gate and read my book.  The planes are spotless.  The seats comfortable.  Staff is friendly.  Air fares are cheap.  If only I could get miles where I could use them, but that’s another story, right?

 

***  World’s Best Hikes: 20 Dream Trails

From national Geographic

http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/trips/best-trails/worlds-best-hikes-dream-trails/

 

***  Value of Frequent-Flyer Miles Will Soon Drop for Delta and United Travelers

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-12-19/value-of-frequent-flier-miles-will-soon-drop-for-delta-and-united-travelers#!

 

***  Check out these amazing hotels:

http://www.huilohuilo.com/en/accommodations

 

***  Confessions of Hotel Housekeepers

by Laura Daily, AARP The Magazine

http://www.aarp.org/travel/travel-tips/info-02-2013/hotel-housekeepers-share-cleaning-and-gratuity-tips.html

 

***  Fodor’s Travel Names Top Destinations for 2014

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Conference-News/Site-Selection/Articles/Fodor-s-Travel-Names-Top-Destinations-for-2014/?cid=eltrMtgNews

 

***  Condé Nast’s GOLD LIST 2014

 

The World’s Best Places to Stay

http://www.cntraveler.com/gold-list/2014

 

***  Lonely Planet’s top destinations for 2014

http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/29/travel/lonely-planet-best-destinations/

 

***  Virginia’s Acorn Crop Very Light This Year

 

Oaks are among the most common hardwood tree species in many parts of Virginia. Because of their importance both as a source of forest regeneration and as a mast crop for wildlife, each year’s acorn crop is the subject of much attention. Many reports from various parts of the Commonwealth indicate that the acorn crop this fall is very light, according to officials at the Virginia Department of Forestry (VDOF) and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF).

 

VDGIF Upland Game Bird Biologist Gary Norman noted, “Acorn production in Virginia in 2013 was low – comparable to the previous low in 2008. The white oak crop appeared to uniformly fail across the state, while some pockets (generally in eastern Virginia) of good red oak production were found. Mast production has alternated from high to low levels since 2010. The impacts of acorns on wildlife populations are extensive and complex. And they are most dramatic where there is little diversity of habitat types and few alternative food sources to acorns.”

 

VDGIF biologists are concerned about a light crop because acorns are a preferred food for many wildlife species, including white-tailed deer, black bear and wild turkey. Oftentimes the search for food creates situations that bring wildlife closer into residential areas to find human-related food sources resulting in unwanted interactions between animals and people.”

 

http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/outdoor-report/2013/11/27/#acorn-crop-very-light-this-year

 

***  Learn to Handle Back Country Emergencies with Wilderness Medical Associates, The Chewonki Foundation, Wiscasset, ME

 

Two wilderness medicine courses are offered each year on the Chewonki campus in Wiscasset. Trip leaders, outdoor professionals and outdoor enthusiasts who want sound strategies for dealing with emergency medical situations in wilderness settings benefit from these thorough programs. The internationally renowned staff of Wilderness Medical Associates (WMA) teaches these intensive courses. Instructors combine morning lectures with realistic simulations that are videotaped and critiqued. WMA courses are widely considered the most complete medical training for outdoor professionals.

 

Please note: These courses fill early. Advance registration is recommended.

 

http://www.chewonki.org/news_detail.asp?news=209

 

***  Video Interlude: Take a Few Minutes to Fly with Air Tahiti Nui

 

We hope that Santa brought you exactly what you wanted this year, and if not there’s always your credit card to bring happiness in the final few days of 2013. We’re thinking some airfare is probably a good idea, and that’s especially the case if you’re headed somewhere aboard Air Tahiti Nui.

If you need further evidence that French Polynesia is a place that you need to visit just head to YouTube, as there’s a new video—shot with one of those GoPro things—that’ll quickly sell you on the idea of a visit.

 

The thing runs about five minutes in length, and it reveals views from the cockpit, the wing, the ground crew, and plenty of crystal clear water. If you don’t have time to visit before the end of the year that’s fine, as 2014 can certainly be your chance to check out Air Tahiti Nui and one of their warm weather destinations. It’s certainly on our list!

 

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2013/12/26/8433/1573/travel/Video+Interlude%3A+Take+a+Few+Minutes+to+Fly+with+Air+Tahiti+Nui

 

***  Which perk is morer important?  Mini-bar or Free Wi-Fi?

 

A recent TripAdvisor.com survey finds that the minibar isn’t getting much love. In fact, just 21% of travelers say it’s an important amenity in a hotel, and many hoteliers believe it will soon be a thing of the past. According to analysts, minibars pull in no more than 0.24% of hotel revenue. Lynn Mohrfeld, president of the California Hotel and Lodging Association, said minibars are a hassle because of fees and restocking.

 

http://www.latimes.com/business/travel/la-fi-mo-the-hotel-mini-bar-extinct-20131226,0,5825766.story#axzz2pOMH8xWZ

 

***  A cave is just a hole sitting on its side:

 

Cave Adventurers, Mill Pond, Marianna, Florida

http://www.caveadventurers.com/

 

***  Time to start planning summer expeditions:

 

BWCA/Quetico Lake Database

 

If this is your first time (or your 50th time) to the Boundary Waters, you should consider hiring an outfitter. There are many outfitters in the area. They are very experienced in helping people plan canoe trips. Their services range from renting canoes to full-fledged outfitting and guiding. They can help you with any or all of the steps below. If this is your first trip to the BWCA (especially if it is your first canoe trip), I would highly recommend talking to an outfitter. Their knowledge and services will greatly enhance your experience, and you will probably enjoy your trip a lot more. See our list of outfitters for more information.

 

The basic steps for planning a canoe trip are:

1.Decide when and where you want to go

2.Reserve a permit (BWCA or Quetico)

3.Review the rules and regulations

4.Buy the necessary maps

5.Make sure your canoe is licensed

6.Obtain a Minnesota fishing license (if desired)

7.Plan, prepare, and pack the food

8.Pack your gear

9.Pick up your permit the day before or day of your entry date

10.Drive to the entry point and enter on the day on your permit

11.Have fun!

 

The Superior National Forest has a publication titled 2013 BWCAW Trip Planning Guide that is a good reference in addition to the steps and information that are outlined here.

 

BOUNDARY WATERS

CANOE AREA WILDERNESS

T R I P P L A N N I N G G U I D E

http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5417451.pdf

 

http://www.mncanoeing.com/tools/lakedatabase.aspx

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: January 2014

Florida’s Blountstown Greenway Bike Path

 

Straddled between two well-known tourist hubs in the Florida Panhandle is Blountstown, a small city in Calhoun County with only two traffic lights. Nonetheless, it is a growing destination. At the center of this movement is the Blountstown Greenway Bike Path, which was taken from an unlikely prospect to the “heartbeat of the community” by a surprising trail hero, a radio-station owner.

 

“When the planning was going on, there were some who couldn’t imagine spending the money on a walking and biking trail that now can’t imagine life without it,” says Kristy Terry, executive director of the county’s chamber of commerce.

 

She continues, “Blountstown is about 50 miles from Tallahassee on its east side and Panama City to the west. We get lots of pass-through traffic. Many [people] who are headed to the beach from Tallahassee, or who are on their way to Tallahassee for a football game, stop and stretch their legs here and really enjoy the trail.”

 

Offering a pleasant respite for both road-weary travelers and locals, the trail’s northern end is pine forest and gently rolling hills that give way to swampy lowlands as it ventures toward the Apalachicola River. Even through downtown, it retains its serene character; restaurants and shops just a few feet away are accessible but don’t disturb those on a quiet retreat, and the lush natural surroundings are a haven for wildlife.

 

“I saw three deer yesterday, and I’ve seen foxes, wild hogs, hawks and a coyote,” says Ben Hall, the city’s fire chief, who runs on the trail every day after work. “It’s safe and well marked. About the only thing you might have to worry about is a squirrel running up your pants leg.”

 

Its very peacefulness and beauty have gone a long way toward dispelling the fears that surfaced when the idea for the trail was first brought forward more than a decade ago.

 

“Opponents were worried about potential crime associated with the trail. They worried that there would be people loitering up and down the trail,” says David Melvin, owner of Melvin Engineering, the firm that guided the trail’s development. “But they came around after the trail was complete. They couldn’t catch the vision of it until they really saw the use. Now it’s a huge source of pride for the community.”

 

The trail’s purposeful design, stringing together the city’s most-prized attractions, also enriches and broadens the experience that one would anticipate from a mere four-mile trail. One of these highlights is the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement on the north end of the trail. With several historical buildings in a rustic farm setting—a schoolhouse, blacksmith shop, grist mill and others—the museum provides a glimpse of life in Northwest Florida during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

 

Mid-trail, exhibits inside the restored depot at M&B Railroad Memorial Park tell the story of the Marianna and Blountstown line on which the rail-trail was built. Out front, the railroad’s original steam locomotive #444 is a cheerful sight with its cherry-red caboose. With less than 30 miles of track, the railroad was Florida’s shortest, but it was so important to the region that the M&B was dubbed “Meat and Bread.” During its long tenure, from 1909 to 1972, it carried, at one time or another, agricultural products, lumber, manufactured goods, mail and passengers.

 

“Tourism is considered one of our best forms of economic development,” says Terry. “We see the trail as a way to capitalize on the resources that we have.”

 

For Hall, the trail’s value is personal. “I started running two-and-a-half years ago for health reasons,” he says. “I’m 5’6″, and I weighed 200 pounds. My doctor said, ‘You’ve got to do something, or I’m going to have to put you on medication.’ So I just started walking, then running, and lost 50 pounds. At first, I could only run for five minutes. Now I’m training for an ultra-marathon that should take five hours.”

 

This current zest for the trail has come a long way from its beginning in the late 1990s when faith in the trail was less certain. “The city and county governments were pretty hesitant on going forward with it,” says Melvin. “They had concerns about how it would work and if it would benefit the community.”

 

But there was one person who never doubted. “Harry Hagan was a real champion for the project,” says Melvin. “He pushed the project through major hurdles because he thought it would make a real difference in the community.”

 

Hagan could be considered a celebrity for a place like Blountstown. He owns two local radio stations, WYBT (1000 AM) and WPHK (102.7 FM), which broadcast music and community news. He is also involved in the city’s Rotary Club. A runner or bicyclist he’s not; he’s simply a citizen with a vision for the trail and the will to see it through.

 

It was a long and arduous journey. “It’s not an easy thing to put one of these trails together. There’s a lot of opposition to them,” says Hagan. “It took us 15 years to do it. It didn’t just happen.”

 

In addition to obstacles of perception, there were logistical hurdles to face. “The biggest issue in those early days was acquiring the right-of-way,” says Melvin. “The Marianna and Blountstown Railroad was in bankruptcy court, and there were confusing titles to the property. It was a real challenge to make it happen.”

 

Rails-to-Trails Conservancy became involved in 1996, purchasing the corridor from bankruptcy court and later selling a section of the corridor to the Florida Department of Transportation who in turn conveyed it to the City of Blountstown. To move the project forward, RTC also developed a concept plan for the trail and made presentations to the city commissioners to advocate for the trail.

 

In 2005, the developing pathway got a boost when it was designated as part of the Florida Trail, a hiking and backpacking route winding through the state from the Georgia border to the Everglades. The trail stretches more than 1,000 miles and is one of 11 such National Scenic Trails in the country (including the well-known Appalachian Trail). It’s maintained and constructed by the U.S. Forest Service and the Florida Trail Association (FTA), whose Panhandle Chapter now helps out with the Blountstown Greenway.

 

But the real payoff came in 2007 with the gleaming of golden, oversized scissors snipping the trail’s ribbon under a bright April sun. Music, food and colorful balloons greeted the droves of people who came to celebrate the trail’s completion and explore the novel recreational asset.

 

Today, the trail continues to be a venue for several races and community events each year, including the popular 5K Catfish Crawl, which the fire department organizes to raise scholarship funds for high school students. It draws about 300 people, a significant amount for rural Florida and a sign of how much the trail has truly been embraced.

 

On a visit last April, Ron Peterson, chair of FTA’s Panhandle Chapter, organized about 20 hikers for a trek down the Blountstown Greenway. Not only did Mayor Tony Shoemake greet them at the railroad museum, he joined them for lunch. This welcoming nature of the city was just one of many reasons that FTA also named Blountstown a Gateway Community for the Florida Trail.

“I love the interactions I have with people on the trail,” says Hall. “I get a lot of thumbs up, high fives and fist bumps. It makes it fun.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Osprey Watcher, The Center for Conservation Biology, Williamsburg, VA (various locations)

http://www.osprey-watch.org/

 

2.)  Internships, The Center for Conservation Biology, Williamsburg, VA

 

Interns and technicians are the lifeblood of field research

 

Much of the field research that CCB conducts requires teams of biologists that are often deployed in remote locations.  Interns and technicians represent critical components of those teams and CCB has been fortunate to have had several hundred dedicated interns and technicians working on projects over the years.

 

Additional information will be posted here on application deadlines for the Summer internship Program and Shorebird internship Program. Interns are typically hired in the fall of each year.

 

http://www.ccbbirds.org/what-we-do/education/internships/

 

3.)  Volunteer, The Nature Conservancy, Arkansas

 

Volunteer in Arkansas

 

Are you interested in

•Working with others who share your love of nature?

•Contributing your time and skills to an organization you believe in?

•Broadening your resume and life experiences?

 

If you answered yes to any of these questions, we’ve got some great opportunities for you. Volunteers help The Nature Conservancy devote a major portion of its funds to land conservation, keeping our effectiveness high and our costs low.

 

Contact Us

 

The Nature Conservancy of Arkansas

601 North University Avenue

Little Rock, AR 72205

Phone: (501) 663-6699

Fax: (501) 663-8332

 

Ozark Highlands Office

38 West Trenton Blvd., Suite 201

Fayetteville, AR 72701

Phone: (479) 973-9110

Fax: (479) 973-9135

 

Staff

Worldwide Office: +1 (703) 841-5300

 

http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/arkansas/volunteer/index.htm

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

***  From Jennifer Jackson:

 

Hi,

 

I’d like to have a position posted on your website.   Here are the details and feel free to contact me if you need any additional information.

 

Jennifer Jackson

The Nature Conservancy

Worldwide Office

Arlington, VA

 

1.)  Manager, Corporate Marketing Partnerships, The Nature Conservancy, Washington, DC

 

POSITION SUMMARY:

The Corporate Marketing Partnerships Manager is responsible for identifying, cultivating, negotiating and securing new cause-related marketing and sponsorship programs that generate revenue, awareness and consumer engagement for The Nature Conservancy’s mission and conservation goals.

 

The Manager will research and cultivate priority corporate partners that are capable of increasing visibility and funding for the Conservancy through innovative marketing programs/campaigns.  At the same time, s/he will be responsible for working with senior team members to develop creative pitches, sponsorship packages and comparable benefits for existing and potential partners. The Manager may also be responsible for negotiating financial terms and contracts with new corporate partners. S/he will manage internal review/approvals/tracking and communication of Corporate Marketing Partnerships to various committees and internal stakeholders.

 

The Manager will also develop, manage and implement program logistics, including relationships with internal and external partners and outside vendors. This role will implement marketing/promotion plans—engaging corporations, developing promotional materials, and working with internal operating units to implement social media, web, media relations and creative efforts associated with the goals of each partnership.

 

HOW TO APPLY

To apply to position number 41731 , submit resume and cover letter as one document.

 

All applications must be submitted in the system prior to 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on January 17th 2014.

 

Failure to complete all of the required fields may result in your application being disqualified from consideration. The information entered in the education and work experience sections are auto screened by the system based on the basic qualifications of the position.

 

You must click submit to apply for the position. Click save if you want to be able to return to your application and submit it later. Once submitted, applications cannot be revised or edited.

 

EOE STATEMENT

The Nature Conservancy is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

 

https://careers.nature.org/psp/P91HTNC_APP/APPLICANT/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_CE.GBL?Page=HRS_CE_JOB_DTL&Action=A&JobOpeningId=41731&SiteId=1&PostingSeq=1

 

2.)  Office Manager (Part-Time), Golden Gate Audubon Society, Berkeley, California

http://www.philanthropynewsdigest.org/jobs/6794-office-manager-part-time

 

3.)  Lead Burn Crew Member, The Nature Conservancy, Lexington, Kentucky

 

The Nature Conservancy is the leading conservation organization working to make a positive impact around the world in more than 30 countries, all 50 United States, and your backyard. Founded in 1951, the mission of The Nature Conservancy is to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends. Visit www.nature.org/  aboutus to learn more.

 

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS

 

The Lead Burn Crew Member participates in wildland fire operations which include ignition, control, mop-up, suppression, monitoring, etc.  The Lead Burn Crew Member will oversee Burn Crew Members with preparing fire lines, maintaining equipment, post-burn monitoring and other tasks. The Lead Burn Crew Member will perform and coordinate other preserve management duties when conditions are not conducive for prescribed burning

 

Assist with, oversee, and coordinate the following activities:

• Perform prairie and forest restoration activities including invasive species eradication using both mechanical and chemical treatments.

• Perform preserve maintenance activities including, but not limited to, boundary marking, trail maintenance and fence repair.

• Maintain fire and stewardship equipment including off-road vehicles, tractors, chain saws, and various hand tools.

• Prepare weekly reports.

• Assist Director of Land Management with other duties as assigned.

 

BASIC QUALIFICATIONS

 

• High school diploma and 1 year training in fire operations or other science-related field or related experience in land management.

• Qualified Fire Fighter Type 1 (Squad Boss). Requirements for FFT1 can be found in the Conservancy Fire Management Manual at: http://www.tncfiremanual.org/SquadBoss.htm.

• Experience operating and maintaining various types of equipment.

• Experience supervising staff is required.

 

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS

• High school diploma and 2 years training in fire operations or other science-related field or related experience in land management.

• Qualified as or able to quickly meet qualifications for NWCG Firefighter Type 1 (Squad Boss) position. Requirements for FFT1 can be found in the Conservancy Fire Management Manual at: http://www.tncfiremanual.org/SquadBoss.htm.

• Ability to operate and maintain various types of equipment in a safe and efficient manner

• Ability to follow instructions from colleagues and supervisor

• Ability to evaluate inputs in a rapidly changing work environment and make decisions that affect firefighters within squad.

• Ability to perform physical work, sometime under adverse conditions or in inclement weather

• Ability to achieve physical fitness standard as set by local Fire Manager

• Obtain licenses and certifications related to first aid.

• Obtain related licenses or certifications such as CPR, herbicide application, driver’s license.

• Experience recognizing plant and animal species.

• Experience operating various types of equipment including power tools, tractors and off-road vehicles.

• Experience loading and pulling trailers.

• Experience performing physical work.

• Valid driver’s license.

• Experience working with and knowledge of natural systems.

 

ADDITIONAL JOB INFORMATION

 

• The Lead Burn Crew Member to lead up to three Burn Crew Members from February – June 2014.

• The position is based in Munfordville, KY where crew housing is available.

• This position requires extensive travel throughout Kentucky.

• Primitive camping may be required while traveling.

 

AUTO SAFETY POLICY

 

This position requires a valid driver’s license and compliance with the Conservancy’s Auto Safety Program.  Employees may not drive Conservancy-owned/leased vehicles, rental cars, or personal vehicles on behalf of the Conservancy if considered “high risk drivers.”  Please see further details in the Auto Safety Program document available at www.nature.org/careers.

 

Employment in this position will be contingent upon completion of a Vehicle Use Agreement, which may include a review of the prospective employee’s motor vehicle record.

 

WORKING CONDITIONS/PHYSICAL EFFORT

 

The Burn Crew Manager may work in variable weather conditions, at remote locations, on difficult and hazardous terrain and under physically demanding circumstances. These conditions:

• require considerable physical exertion and/or muscular strain

• present frequent possibility of injury

• require long hours in isolated settings

 

BENEFITS-SHORT TERM POSITIONS

 

The Nature Conservancy offers competitive compensation, 401k or savings-plan matching for eligible employees, excellent benefits, flexible work policies and a collaborative work environment. We also provide professional development opportunities and promote from within. As a result, you will find a culture that supports and inspires conservation achievement and personal development, both within the workplace and beyond.

 

SALARY INFORMATION :  $15.00/hour

 

HOW TO APPLY :  To apply to position number 41754, submit resume and cover letter as one document.  All applications must be submitted in the system prior to 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on January 14, 2014.

 

Failure to complete all of the required fields may result in your application being disqualified from consideration. The information entered in the education and work experience sections are auto screened by the system based on the basic qualifications of the position.

 

You must click “submit” to apply for the position. You may select “save for later” if you prefer to create a draft application for future submission. Once submitted, applications cannot be revised or edited.

 

If you are experiencing technical issues, please refer to our applicant user guide or contact applyhelp@tnc.org.

 

EOE STATEMENT

 

The Nature Conservancy is an Equal Opportunity Employer.  Women, minorities, veterans and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

 

The successful applicant must meet the requirements of The Nature Conservancy’s background screening process

 

https://careers.nature.org/psp/P91HTNC_APP/APPLICANT/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_CE.GBL?Page=HRS_CE_JOB_DTL&Action=A&JobOpeningId=41754&SiteId=1&PostingSeq=1

 

4.)  Chapter Liaison and Communications Assistant, Cheetah Conservation Fund, Alexandria, VA

http://www.indeed.com/cmp/Cheetah-Conservation-Fund/jobs/Chapter-Liaison-Communication-Assistant-73bfd983b43a59b1

 

5.)  Communications Coordinator, Oregon Wild, Portland, Oregon

 

Founded in 1974, Oregon Wild is a non-profit conservation organization with a history of accomplishment. Our victories include safeguarding over 1.7 million acres of Wilderness and 1,800 miles of Wild & Scenic Rivers through federal legislation, legal victories that have protected hundreds of thousands of acres of old-growth forests and preserved critical wetland habitat, and the preservation of numerous endangered species, from coho salmon to northern spotted owls. Oregon Wild enjoys a national reputation as a pioneering organization that is both highly strategic and effective, with strong policy expertise.

 

The Communications Coordinator catalyzes public demand for protecting Oregon’s wildlands, wildlife, and waters. This position involves specific electronic communications, media outreach, and writing tasks as well as general outreach duties to current or prospective Oregon Wild supporters.

 

This is a diverse and fast-paced position requiring experience in advocacy or campaign communications. The focus of this position is on increasing public and political support for Oregon Wild conservation campaigns though electronic communications and social media; outreach to traditional print, radio, and television outlets; and the development and use of effective public messaging.

 

Position Responsibilities

 

Electronic Communications (50%):

• Develop and implement an overall electronic communications strategy, encompassing social media, website, email, and other resources, to increase support for Oregon Wild campaigns

• Grow the Oregon Wild supporter base of online supporters, activists and donors

• Coordinate e-mail action alert lists, Facebook page, Twitter feed, blog, and other electronic communications, assigning writing and content generation as necessary

• Oversee the Oregon Wild website, including the coordination of a 2014 redesign and content update

• Shoot and edit video and audio clips, produce video spots and other materials to support advocacy campaigns

• Working with other staff, develop and place content on major blogs and other online publications

 

General Communications (40%):

• Draft and distribute press releases, editorial board mailings, opinion columns, and letters to the editor

• Maintain Oregon Wild media distribution lists, distribute press releases and other materials to the news media

• Make pitch calls to reporters and editorial writers to generate media coverage of Oregon Wild campaigns

• Organize regular press events, teleconferences, editorial board briefings, field tours and other forums to promote Oregon Wild campaign objectives

• Provide drafting and editorial support on fact sheets, appeal letters, postcards, and other written materials including occasional conservation reports

• Working with the Conservation Director and appropriate staff, develop communications strategies and messaging in support of Oregon Wild conservation campaigns

 

Outreach Functions (10%):

• Generate public comments in support of Oregon Wild conservation goals

• Recruit and educate prominent community members, business leaders, and others as spokespeople for conservation campaigns

• Organize occasional outreach events such as Oregon Wild Wednesday, film screenings, happy hours, etc

• Other duties as assigned

 

Qualifications

Required:

• Experience in electronic communications, preferably in an advocacy or political campaign setting

• Ability to balance competing deadlines across multiple campaigns

• Excellent writing skills for traditional and online formats

• Excellent oral communication skills

• A keen sense of effective communications and campaign strategies

• A demonstrated commitment to protecting and restoring Oregon’s wildlands, wildlife, and waters

Desired:

• Experience working with traditional print, TV, and radio media

• Skills in HD video filming and editing

• Knowledge of Salsa CRM or similar supporter management and e-mail action tool

• Experience working in Drupal CMS or similar website management platform

• Experience working in Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop

 

Salary and Benefits:

This is a full time, exempt position that includes benefits. Some evening and weekend hours will be required. The starting salary for this position is between $32,000 and $40,000, depending on experience. Benefits include paid health insurance, 403(b) retirement plan option, generous vacation, and other paid time off.

 

 

Application Guidelines/Contact:

Applications must be sent by e-mail to: jobs@oregonwild.org. Please submit a cover letter, resume, and two work samples consolidated into a single PDF or Word document. Review of completed applications will begin on February 3, 2014.

 

Salary:

$32,000 and $40,000, depending on experience

http://www.macslist.org/macs-list/Oregon-Wild/Communications-Coordinator/p7KWn6MLZGCh/

 

6.)  Habitat Restoration Coordinator/Project Manager, The Freshwater Trust, Portland, Oregon

https://www.macslist.org/macs-list/The-Freshwater-Trust/Habitat-Restoration-Coordinator-Project-Manager/pkZtc6d2m9dS/

 

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

7.)  Snowmaking Supervisor, Seven Springs Mountain Resort, Seven Springs, PA

http://bit.ly/KofnyC

 

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2014 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for December 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for December  2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“We did not think of the great open plains, the beautiful rolling hills, and winding streams with tangled growth, as ‘wild.’ Only to the white man was nature a “wilderness” and only to him was the land ‘infested’ with ‘wild’ animals and ‘savage’ people.”

– Chief [Luther] Standing Bear

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Ned’s upcoming travel:

***  Ned’s January trip tp Sweden by way of Austria

***  Feeling insecure: Pre-Checked?  Pre-Rejected?

***  World’s Best Hikes: 20 Dream Trails

***  Value of Frequent-Flyer Miles Will Soon Drop for Delta and United Travelers

***  Check out these amazing hotels:

***  Confessions of Hotel Housekeepers

***  Fodor’s Travel Names Top Destinations for 2014

***  Condé Nast’s GOLD LIST 2014 –  The World’s Best Places to Stay

***  Lonely Planet’s top destinations for 2014

***  Virginia’s Acorn Crop Very Light This Year

***  Learn to Handle Back Country Emergencies

***  Video Interlude: Take a Few Minutes to Fly with Air Tahiti Nui

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: December 2013

The Frisco Trail – Fayetteville, Arkansas

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Trail Crew openings, Shenandoah National Park, Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

2.)  Bluebird Trail Monitoring, Jennings Environmental Education Center, Brady Township, Butler County, Pennsylvania

3.)  Volunteer expeditions in Madagascar, Blue Ventures, London, UK (expeditions based at Andavadoaka, Madagascar

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Trail Crew Leader, Baxter State Park, Millinocket, ME

2.)  VP of Marketing & Communications, Trout Unlimited, Arlington, Virginia

3.)  Executive Director, JACKSON HOLE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE, Jackson, Wyoming

4.)  Marine Science Instructor Positions, Seacamp Association, Inc., Big Pine Key FL

5.)  Outdoor Education Instructor, Pali Institute, Running Springs CA

6.)  Field Project Coordinator, Montana Conservation Corps (MCC), Bozeman / Helena / Kalispell / Missoula, Montana

7.)  Associate Director for Communications, Conservation Lands Foundation, Durango, CO

8.)  Executive Director, Northern Forest Canoe Trail, Waitsfield, Vermont

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel:

 

January 18-25, 2014 — Stockholm ; Karlskrona, Linkoping, Gothenberg, Sweden.

 

January 25-28, 2014 — Helsinki, Finland

 

January 28 – February 1, 2014 — Portsmouth, UK

 

March 17 – 20, 2014 — Accra, Ghana

 

March 24 –  28, 2014 — Monetery, Calif.

 

June 2 – 4, 2014 — Abu Dhabi, UAE

 

***  Ned’s January trip tp Sweden by way of Austria:

 

My upcoming trip to Sweden has been booked (not by me) on Austrian, with a five hour layover at Vienna.  I’ve done a little research on line and I can’t say the majority of reviews about Austrian and thweir lounge at Vienna are great.  Even thiough I have Star Alliance Gold / United MileagePlus Premier Platinum status, I can’t reserve a seat without paying (more than $100 for an exit row window), until 36 hours before departure.  But Austrian is a new carrier for me, and Vienna will be a new airpot.  So watch for my review in an upcoming issue of YVNS.

 

As an aside, I will also be flying two flights on Norweigian and one ion SAS on this trip, and returning from London on United.

 

Apart from the Norwegian miles, I’ll accumulate some miles on my UA MileagePlus account.  But new rules on United make it much more difficult to earn Priemier qualifying milede.  There ‘s a minimum dollar amount you have to spend, and tickerts must be written by UA.  This makes it doubly and triply difficult to attain elite staus starting in 2014.

 

Since USAirways is now American, Washington Reagan National goesa from being a Star Alliance hub to a One World hub.  I fly a lot of flights on US, but book my miles on UIA.  Time for a new strategy.

 

***  Feeling insecure: Pre-Checked?  Pre-Rejected?

 

Thanksgiving holiday…went to Baltimore (BWI) airport. Two security people standing at the entry to the security line waved me off to a new security line (security area C), saying that I had been pre-cleared by TSA for expedited screening, meaning I didn’t have to remove my laptop or take my shoes off. I looked at my boarding pass, printed at the office, and could see nothing special that indicated pre-clearance. But no one else was at security C, the security agent stamped an X in a circle on my boarding pass and I zoomed through.

 

On the way BACK to Baltimore, I printed my boarding pass at the airport. It clearly said TSA PRE at the top. I had to go through the regular line with all the other people.

 

This makes no sense, being backwards of what should have happened. I have no idea why the TSA selected me and then rejected me.

 

I have NOT paid the $100 fee to TSA for pre screening, had an interview, etc.

Anyone else have this experience?

 

Sue Bumpous

 

***  World’s Best Hikes: 20 Dream Trails

From national Geographic

http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/trips/best-trails/worlds-best-hikes-dream-trails/

 

***  Value of Frequent-Flyer Miles Will Soon Drop for Delta and United Travelers

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-12-19/value-of-frequent-flier-miles-will-soon-drop-for-delta-and-united-travelers#!

 

***  Check out these amazing hotels:

http://www.huilohuilo.com/en/accommodations

 

***  Confessions of Hotel Housekeepers

by Laura Daily, AARP The Magazine

http://www.aarp.org/travel/travel-tips/info-02-2013/hotel-housekeepers-share-cleaning-and-gratuity-tips.html

 

***  Fodor’s Travel Names Top Destinations for 2014

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Conference-News/Site-Selection/Articles/Fodor-s-Travel-Names-Top-Destinations-for-2014/?cid=eltrMtgNews

 

***  Condé Nast’s GOLD LIST 2014

 

The World’s Best Places to Stay

http://www.cntraveler.com/gold-list/2014

 

***  Lonely Planet’s top destinations for 2014

http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/29/travel/lonely-planet-best-destinations/

 

***  Virginia’s Acorn Crop Very Light This Year

 

Oaks are among the most common hardwood tree species in many parts of Virginia. Because of their importance both as a source of forest regeneration and as a mast crop for wildlife, each year’s acorn crop is the subject of much attention. Many reports from various parts of the Commonwealth indicate that the acorn crop this fall is very light, according to officials at the Virginia Department of Forestry (VDOF) and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF).

 

VDGIF Upland Game Bird Biologist Gary Norman noted, “Acorn production in Virginia in 2013 was low – comparable to the previous low in 2008. The white oak crop appeared to uniformly fail across the state, while some pockets (generally in eastern Virginia) of good red oak production were found. Mast production has alternated from high to low levels since 2010. The impacts of acorns on wildlife populations are extensive and complex. And they are most dramatic where there is little diversity of habitat types and few alternative food sources to acorns.”

 

VDGIF biologists are concerned about a light crop because acorns are a preferred food for many wildlife species, including white-tailed deer, black bear and wild turkey. Oftentimes the search for food creates situations that bring wildlife closer into residential areas to find human-related food sources resulting in unwanted interactions between animals and people.”

 

http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/outdoor-report/2013/11/27/#acorn-crop-very-light-this-year

 

***  Learn to Handle Back Country Emergencies with Wilderness Medical Associates, The Chewonki Foundation, Wiscasset, ME

 

Two wilderness medicine courses are offered each year on the Chewonki campus in Wiscasset. Trip leaders, outdoor professionals and outdoor enthusiasts who want sound strategies for dealing with emergency medical situations in wilderness settings benefit from these thorough programs. The internationally renowned staff of Wilderness Medical Associates (WMA) teaches these intensive courses. Instructors combine morning lectures with realistic simulations that are videotaped and critiqued. WMA courses are widely considered the most complete medical training for outdoor professionals.

 

Please note: These courses fill early. Advance registration is recommended.

 

http://www.chewonki.org/news_detail.asp?news=209

 

***  Video Interlude: Take a Few Minutes to Fly with Air Tahiti Nui

 

We hope that Santa brought you exactly what you wanted this year, and if not there’s always your credit card to bring happiness in the final few days of 2013. We’re thinking some airfare is probably a good idea, and that’s especially the case if you’re headed somewhere aboard Air Tahiti Nui.

If you need further evidence that French Polynesia is a place that you need to visit just head to YouTube, as there’s a new video—shot with one of those GoPro things—that’ll quickly sell you on the idea of a visit.

 

The thing runs about five minutes in length, and it reveals views from the cockpit, the wing, the ground crew, and plenty of crystal clear water. If you don’t have time to visit before the end of the year that’s fine, as 2014 can certainly be your chance to check out Air Tahiti Nui and one of their warm weather destinations. It’s certainly on our list!

 

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2013/12/26/8433/1573/travel/Video+Interlude%3A+Take+a+Few+Minutes+to+Fly+with+Air+Tahiti+Nui

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: December 2013

 

The Frisco Trail – Fayetteville, Arkansas

 

“Like many American communities developing their trail networks, Fayetteville is booming…”

 

Used railroad corridor: A portion of the trail follows the former St. Louis & San Francisco Railway, from which the trail gets its name. Another section, nearly a half-mile long, is immediately adjacent to an active railroad corridor, which is used by the Arkansas & Missouri Railroad.

 

Getting There: Frisco Trail is a short drive east of I-540 in Fayetteville. Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport (One Airport Blvd., Bentonville) lies about 30 miles north of the trail.

 

Access and Parking: Frisco Trail can be accessed at the intersection of West Spring Street and West Avenue. Public parking is available at that intersection. The trail can also be accessed in the 500 block where it crosses Center Street, Prairie Street, and Martin Luther King Boulevard.

 

To navigate the area with an interactive GIS map, visit RTC’s free trail-finder website, TrailLink.com.

 

Although only a relatively short rail-trail at 1.3 miles, the Frisco Trail in Fayetteville, Arkansas, has had an oversized impact on its city.

 

Since the entire length was opened in 2010, the Frisco Trail has provided a convenient connection right into the vibrant entertainment center of Fayetteville, and along with the Scull Creek Trail forms the spine of Fayetteville’s extensive trail network.

 

Interestingly, the Frisco Trail parallels, at various stages, both an active and a disused rail corridor. The northern end of the trail, from West Spring Street to West Prospect Street, runs adjacent to an active Arkansas & Missouri Railroad line, which carries freight and excursion rail traffic. This sharing of rail corridors for both motorized and non-motorized travel is a growing trend in the American rail-trail scene – today, almost 10 percent of rail-trails are actually rails-with-trails – adjacent to or within an active rail corridor right-of-way.

 

Like many American communities developing their trail networks, Fayetteville is booming – its population has grown 27 percent in the last decade and in the past few years it’s been ranked one of the best places to live, to go to college, to do business or to retire. It is no coincidence that this acclaim has come as the city’s long-range trails and greenways plan has started to come to fruition – all anchored by the short but powerful Frisco Trail.

 

The Frisco Trail is one of the many rail-with-trail projects featured in our new report, America’s Rails-with-Trails: A Resource for Planners, Agencies and Advocates on Trails Along Active Railroad Corridors.

 

Among the number of developers drawn to Fayetteville by its trail system is the Specialized Real Estate Group, which is building an apartment complex for more than 600 residents close to the Frisco Trail.

 

“The people we serve love the connectivity and health benefits of the trail,” says Specialized Real Estate Group President Seth Mims. “There are obvious environmental benefits of choosing walking or biking over using a car, and these benefits give our developments an edge over conventional apartments built on the outskirts of town. In addition to our proximity to campus, we chose to build on the trail to give residents access to the entertainment district and greenspaces.”

 

The realization of the Frisco Trail is a study in the challenges and opportunities common to many potential rail-with-trail projects. It took two years for the City of Fayetteville and the Arkansas & Missouri Railroad to find common ground over the railroad’s fencing and insurance requirements, and how close the trail could be to the tracks. In exchange for complying with these requirements, the railroad gave the city a 99-year lease for the corridor for free. “I think they finally signed the document because they wanted me to go away,” says Fayetteville’s Trails Coordinator Matt Mihalevich.

 

A big selling point for the railroad was that a trail would improve safety around the corridor. There had been a number of incidents of trespassers (often inebriated) crossing the tracks on their way to and from the downtown entertainment district. The provision of a safe and convenient pathway has now eliminated the need to dangerously cross the active tracks. Since the trail was opened, there have been no accidents involving a trail user and a train.

 

Besides the decrease in trespassing, the railroad has also received a functional benefit from the trail, in that they often board for their excursion train trips in Fayetteville directly from the trail.

 

On its route from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard to the connection with the Scull Creek Trail, the Frisco Trail passes through Frisco Park, an undeveloped section of woods. Night-time travelers need not worry, though—the trail is well-lit. This portion of trail follows an abandoned railroad bed that was originally built by the Pacific & Greater Eastern Railroad at the end of the 19th century. Later it was used by the Ozark & Cherokee Central during the early part of the 20th century before it was taken over by the St. Louis & San Francisco Railway, better known as the Frisco. The corridor was abandoned in the early 1980s but remained undeveloped until the city bought the right-of-way at the beginning of this century.

 

When Rails-to-Trails Conservancy caught up with Mihalevich last week, he was keen to let us know that Fayetteville is continuing to work toward its goal of making trails a key part of the city’s identity – an extension of the Frisco Trail and construction of the new Tsa La Gi Trail are currently underway and due for opening in March.

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Trail Crew openings, Shenandoah National Park, Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

http://www.appalachiantrail.org/get-involved/volunteer

 

2.)  Bluebird Trail Monitoring, Jennings Environmental Education Center, Brady Township, Butler County, Pennsylvania

 

The weekly monitoring Jennings’ bluebird nest boxes during the bluebird breeding season.

 

https://www.volunteers.dcnr.state.pa.us/ProjectSearch.aspx

 

3.)  Volunteer expeditions in Madagascar, Blue Ventures, London, UK (expeditions based at Andavadoaka, Madagascar

http://www.blueventures.org/#

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Trail Crew Leader, Baxter State Park, Millinocket, ME

 

(Length: 26 weeks)

 

Class Code: 9436

Range: 14

Salary: $12.27 hourly / $981.60 bi-weekly

Value of 100% State Paid Health and Dental: $377.46 biweekly

Value of 95% State Paid Health and Dental: $359.27 biweekly

Value of State’s share of Employee’s Retirement: 11.54% of base pay.

 

DESCRIPTION: This is maintenance and personal services work in coordinating and overseeing work crews involved in Baxter State Park trail construction and maintenance. Responsibilities include prioritizing projects, scheduling daily activities, assigning tasks, providing training, and overseeing work crews in their daily operations. Supervision is exercised over students, volunteers and laborers. Work is performed under general supervision.

 

TYPICAL DUTIES:

…Establishes priorities for the workweek and sequence of projects in order to coordinate and

ensure efficient completion of the established project work schedule.

…Coordinates and schedules work crews’ daily activities in order to ensure trail construction

and maintenance projects are completed efficiently and in a timely manner.

…Assigns tasks on a daily basis in order to provide direction and ensure completion of

projects.

…Oversees the daily activities of work crews in order to provide direction and ensure comple-

tion of projects.

…Makes decisions regarding natural materials to be used on projects, areas to be used for

living space during projects, and methods to be used in performing tasks in order to

ensure safety and protection of the environment during construction and maintenance

projects.

…Assesses trail conditions, processes observations into written reports, and makes recom-

mendations in order to provide training and ensure protection of the environment.

…Maintains a variety of specialized hand and power tools in order to ensure and maintain

continued working order of tools.

…Communicates with laborers, volunteers, supervisors, and others in order to provide

information, training, and motivation.

…Inventories tools, equipment, camping and other gear in order to maintain records and

ensure accountability of materials, tools, and equipment.

…Plans and orders food for crews on a weekly basis in order to ensure crews have food

during long projects.

…Organizes crews, tools, and equipment to respond to search and rescue operations as well

as forest fires within the Park in order to provide assistance and direction in emergency

situations.

 

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND ABILITIES:

…Knowledge of trail construction and maintenance techniques.

…Knowledge of specialized tools and equipment used in trail construction and maintenance.

…Knowledge of specialized tools, equipment and techniques used in forest fire suppression.

…Knowledge of first-aid procedures.

…Knowledge of backpacking, camping and hiking techniques.

…Ability to plan, organize, assign, and direct crews of students, volunteers and laborers.

…Ability to motivate and supervise work crews during short and long-term projects.

…Ability to plan and implement daily activities for projects.

…Ability to communicate effectively orally and in writing.

…Ability to safely utilize and maintain specialized tools and equipment.

…Ability to hike long distances carrying heavy packs (50+ lbs.) and perform strenuous manual labor.

 

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Two seasons of trail work experience which includes at least one season of leading projects crews.

 

APPLICATION FORMS AT: http://www.baxterstateparkauthority.com/employment/seasonal.htm

 

Questions about the application process?

Contact Jean Howes at  (207) 723-9616  or Jean.Howes@maine.gov

 

Questions about the BSP Trail Maintenance Program and operations? Contact Paul Sannicandro – Trail Supervisor at Paul.Sannicandro@maine.gov

 

http://www.americantrails.org/NewsAction/baxter-crewleader-job-14.html

http://www.baxterstateparkauthority.com/employment/seasonal.htm

 

2.)  VP of Marketing & Communications, Trout Unlimited, Arlington, Virginia

 

Trout Unlimited is a national organization with more than 155,000 volunteers organized into about 400 chapters nationwide. This dedicated grassroots army is matched by a respected staff of organizers,

 

lawyers, policy experts and scientists, who work out of more than 30 offices. Our mission is to conserve, protect and restore North America’s cold-water fisheries and their watersheds.

 

Position Summary

 

This is an exciting opportunity to join Trout Unlimited preferably in their headquarters in Arlington, Virginia – as the Vice President of Marketing & Communications.  The VP of Marketing &

 

Communications will report directly to the CEO and is member of the Senior Staff.  The VP of Marketing & Communications will be responsible for the execution of Trout Unlimited’s communications,

 

marketing and branding strategies. The VP of Marketing & Communications will oversee all activities that promote, enhance, and protect the organization’s brand reputation and identify communication

 

goals. A key objective is to manage the development and production of Trout’s varied and integrated communications activities and tools including: supporting all events and initiatives, direct mail and

 

marketing, newsletters and other print publications; Website content, E-news and other online communications, social and conventional media and public relations, and marketing.

 

Duties and Responsibilities

-Manage the development and production of all Trout Unlimited’s communications tools, with a particular emphasis on online communications and tools such as social media.

-Develop and promote the TU brand.

-Experience in deploying community building web sites is important.

-Manage production of all marketing and promotional materials.

-Increase membership acquisition program.

-Increase Trout’s online community activity.

-Improve internal processes to improve implementation of the communications strategy.

-Expand partnerships within the outdoor, and related, industry.

 

Job Requirements

 

Qualifications

-10 years of relevant professional experience.

-Excellent written and oral communication skills. Demonstrated versatility in writing for all media platforms.

-Creative and strategic application of digital and social media technologies.

-Experience in planning, writing, editing, and production of newsletters, press releases, annual reports, marketing literature, and other print publications.

-Innovative thinker, with a track record for problem solving and developing action plans and managing output.

-Self-reliant, results oriented, and strong interpersonal skills with the ability to engage and collaborate and develop consensus with staff and colleagues.

-Experience managing a diverse and remote staff. ◾Ability to make decisions in a changing environment and anticipate future needs.

-Background in policy and advocacy communications a plus.

-Passion for Trout Unlimited’s mission is essential.  A passion for fishing is helpful.

-A professional and resourceful style; flexible and adaptable style; a leader who can positively impact both strategic and tactical communication initiatives.

-Ability to work with grassroots leaders and volunteers.

-Ability to work both independently without close oversight, but also a team player who will productively engage with others at varying levels of seniority within and outside of TU.

-Previous experience in conservation organization or the outdoor industry.

-Strong organizational and time management skills with exceptional attention to detail.

 

How to Apply:  Please send a letter of interest and resume to Vivie Yen at vyen@tu.org by January 24, 2014. No phone calls please.

 

This is not an all-inclusive list of duties and responsibilities.

 

TU is an Equal Employment Opportunity & Affirmative Action Employer pursuant to Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act & Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistant Act.

 

TU hires staff without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, age, gender, sexual orientation, marital status or disability.

http://jobs.prnewsonline.com/jobseeker/job/12953830/

 

3.)  Executive Director, JACKSON HOLE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE, Jackson, Wyoming

 

JACKSON HOLE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE seeks an Executive Director. Based in Jackson, Wyoming, the Alliance works to protect the wildlife, wild places, and community character of Jackson Hole. As the Alliance heads into its 35th year, a new ED will have the rare opportunity to lead an organization with a high profile, dedicated staff, committed supporters, and engaged Board of Directors in one of the most stunning landscapes in the country. Key factors for successful candidates include at least five to seven years in a non-profit leadership position; ability to act as the lead advocate for the Alliance with a genuine passion and concern for the mission; and a proven track record of effective staff management, strategic planning, campaign development and oversight, internal and external relations, fundraising, and budget management. To learn more about this opportunity and to apply (by January 10), please visit the jobs section of our website: JHAlliance.org/Jobs

 

http://hcn.adqic.com/finder/ad_1785633.html

 

4.)  Marine Science Instructor Positions, Seacamp Association, Inc., Big Pine Key FL

 

Company Description: A non-profit, residential, environmental educational organization offering marine science programs for 10-17 year olds in a summer camp setting and to visiting elementary, middle, secondary, college, and adult groups throughout the school year.

 

Year Round Position: Full time Marine Science Instructor positions available.

 

Description: Staff lead interpretive programs in tropical marine science for campers/visiting schools and participate in hospitality services required to run a residential facility. Extensive training: science seminars; American Red Cross Waterfront Lifeguarding, Oxygen Administration, First Aid, and CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer; skin diving leadership and Rescue Diver (for currently certified divers only); seamanship and boat handling leading to a Limited license by the USCG; camp life; and teaching techniques.

 

Qualifications:  College graduate with a degree in marine science, the biological sciences, or a related field.  All applicants must be strong swimmers.  Prefer one year of teaching experience and SCUBA certification.

 

Benefits: Salary, housing, meals when participants are in residence, training, worker’s compensation insurance, and staff boat use during time off.

 

To apply: Send resume with complete work history and cover letter to info@seacamp.org. We will contact you to complete your employment packet.  The process will include an application, official college transcripts, and references. Applicants will be required to submit a Level II fingerprint background check and drug screening prior to employment

 

Seacamp Association, Inc.

1300 Big Pine Avenue

Big Pine Key, FL 33043

1-877-SEACAMP

info@seacamp.org

 

http://www.ecojobs.com/jobs_details.php?sec=5EW&AID=87414

 

5.)  Outdoor Education Instructor, Pali Institute, Running Springs CA

http://www.ecojobs.com/jobs_details.php?sec=5EW&AID=87391

 

6.)  Field Project Coordinator, Montana Conservation Corps (MCC), Bozeman / Helena / Kalispell / Missoula, Montana

 

The Montana Conservation Corps (MCC) is hiring the position of Field Project Coordinator, one position in Bozeman, Helena and Kalispell and two positions based in Missoula, Montana.

 

MCC is a crew based program whose mission is to inspire young people through hands-on conservation service to be leaders, stewards of the land, and engaged citizens who improve their communities.   MCC has an annual $5 million budget and receives funding from AmeriCorps, project sponsors, grants and private donations.  Statewide each year, the MCC has over 200 AmeriCorps young adult members and 100 youth corps members who perform natural resource work across the region with a variety of land use agencies and non-profit partners.

 

The Field Project Coordinator is a seasonal staff position whose primary duties include technical and logistical support for MCC crews in the field, coordination of crew projects and communication between the MCC and project partners.  Activities will include field visitation to help insure the successful and safe completion of MCC projects, technical guidance, logistical support, tool/gear maintenance and inventory, and oversight to insure compliance with MCC policies and procedures.

 

Primary duties include:

•Provide technical and logistical support for conservation, natural resource and other service projects.

•Visit crews in the field to provide guidance, support and assistance to Crew Leaders.

•Work with leaders to ensure quality field work performance; write performance evaluations of crew leaders.

•Oversee compliance with field safety procedures; support the creation of a ‘culture of professionalism’ within the each crew.

•Ensure field work and activities are in compliance with MCC policies and regulations.

•Be in the field for multiple days to work alongside crews.

•Submit required reports and documentation of field visit and other activity.

•Collect written and photographic documentation of projects.

•Monitor projects to assure that pre, during and post-site visits are performed and documented.

 

Qualifications:

•At least two years of college or equivalent work experience.

•Previous leadership and corps experience.

•Relevant technical skills and experience with a wide range of power and hand tools.

•Effective communication skills.

•A valid driver’s license. Able and willing to travel extensively and work a variable schedule.

•Advanced first aid certification desirable.

 

Salary is $1,043 biweekly.  MCC is accepting applications now.  Start date is early April, 2014; end date October 31, 2014.

 

To apply for Bozeman submit resume and cover letter to chris@mtcorps.org

 

To apply for Helena submit resume and cover letter to tim@mtcorps.org

 

To apply for Kalispell submit resume and cover letter to clifford@mtcorps.org

 

To apply for Missoula submit resume and cover letter to bgrillo@mtcorps.org

 

http://mtcorps.org/about/career-opportunities/

 

7.)  Associate Director for Communications, Conservation Lands Foundation, Durango, CO

 

The Associate Director for Communications will work with staff to develop a communications platform for the Conservation Lands Foundation, inform targeted audiences about the National Conservation Lands, conduct communications trainings and engage the public through traditional and non-traditional media.

 

Please click on link for full job description, salary, benefit package and how to apply: http://www.conservationlands.org/job-announcement-associate-director-for-communications-at-clf

 

Conservationist II $4115 – $5110 Full Time – Permanent, CCC Ukiah, California Conservation Corps, Ukiah, CA

http://www.ccc.ca.gov/about/staffjobs/Documents/14-1121%20%20CII%20Ukiah.pdf

 

8.)  Executive Director, Northern Forest Canoe Trail, Waitsfield, Vermont

 

The Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) seeks an experienced, energetic, and passionate Executive Director to lead a dynamic, multi-state organization. Under the leadership of a collaborative Executive Director, with the help of an experienced staff, NFCT will continue strengthening Trail stewardship, catalyzing rural community vitality, introducing future generations to this resource, and envisioning and implementing new ideas which will have a positive impact along the Trail. The Executive Director will have primary responsibility for leading and securing funding for NFCT’s 2020 Strategic Plan in close partnership with partners, volunteers, funders, and Board of Directors. We seek a leader with a demonstrated ability to uphold and communicate a strong and compelling vision, and to deploy innovative thinking to move the organization to the next level.

 

The Organization: NFCT is a leader in water trail stewardship and management, inspiring public access, outdoor experience, and community vitality along our 740-mile corridor that traverses New York, Vermont, Québec, New Hampshire, and Maine.  Founded in 2000, NFCT established our route based on traditional Native American travel routes across the Northern Forest Region.  In our first decade plus, we have developed a suite of tools and programs to support our mission of leveraging the corridor for public recreation and health benefits, conservation efforts, and rural economic development. Current resources include navigational maps, a guidebook, online tools, and several programs to develop and support recreational access for paddlers.  We have maintained a small, highly skilled staff (total of five currently) and an extensive network of partners to enable us to be effective across a large geography.  NFCT is highly regarded as a regional leader, exceptionally skilled as a collaborator, and consistently diligent with a commitment to attaining outcomes.

 

While NFCT is by some measures a small organization, it has firmly established itself as a leader with and among partners in the region.  The brand of the organization and its leadership has been important and refreshing across the four-state territory in creating real results.  The culture and strategy of the organization is inclusive across a range of sectors including environmental, economic and rural development, recreation, outdoor industry, and state and federal agency, all with a focus on convening and leading efforts to maximize shared outcomes. NFCT is committed to continuing this approach, and seeks an Executive Director with the requisite leadership skills and commitment to this collaborative approach.

 

Duties of the Position:  The Executive Director will lead and manage NFCT staff, and work with the board of directors, partners, and volunteers to achieve strategic goals.  The Executive Director will also work to strengthen the capacity of NFCT to pursue its mission, including fundraising, staff development, administrative systems, financial management, and board development.  Specific duties include but are not limited to:

•Leading and managing a talented, dynamic staff, some of whom work remotely

•Developing and leading an engaged Board of Directors

•Leading organizational fundraising efforts, both private and public

•Leading and coordinating partnerships that are core to mission delivery

•Managing organization’s finances

•Coordinating overall organizational strategy and program plans

•Writing and speaking to a wide variety of audiences

•Forecasting and addressing obstacles

•Creating and maintaining a fun and healthy culture of engagement and accomplishment

 

Qualifications:

•Strong and proven leadership, management, and fundraising experience

•Specific experience in both collaborative and public leadership

•Strong fundraising capability, including direct cultivation and solicitation of individuals, foundations, and other funding entities

•Preference for 5–7 years of experience in a non-profit leadership role, or comparable evidence of experience leading and managing a complex enterprise

•Excellent writing and public speaking skills

•Experience with financial management, including budgeting and financial reporting

•Experience / comfort managing remotely located staff

•Familiarity with Northern Forest Region and/or recreation field a plus, but not required.

 

Compensation:  Robust compensation package including competitive salary and health benefits, sick leave, comp time, and paid vacation.  NFCT offices are based in Vermont’s beautiful Mad River Valley.  Remote work location within region would be considered.

 

To Apply:  Please email your resume and cover letter as one document in PDF format to jobs@northernforestcanoetrail.org, addressed to Warren Cook and Betsy Paine, Co-Chairs NFCT Search Committee. The position will remain open until an outstanding candidate is found. The search committee will begin reviewing the applicants’ statements of interest and qualifications beginning December 15, 2013. It is the NFCT Board of Director’s desire to have an Executive Director hired by February 2014.

 

No phone calls to the office, please.

 

The Northern Forest Canoe Trail is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

 

http://www.northernforestcanoetrail.org/AboutNFCT-2/NFCT-Jobs-83

 

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
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Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
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Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
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Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for November 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for November  2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“No effort that we make to attain something beautiful is ever lost.”

– Helen Keller

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Ned’s upcoming travel:

***  Google Launches World’s First High-Resolution Interactive Map of Global Deforestation

***  Illegal lumber – Wood you buy?

***  Here’s a neat sports park reusing packing materials to create trick spots

***  The Radisson Blu Hotel’s 82-Foot Aquadom Aquarium Brings Sea-Life and Scuba Diving to Berlin

***  From Business Travel News:  BTN’s 2013 Airline Survey: Follow The Leader

***  Fodors: Where to Go This Winter

***  More charging stations added at airports for power-hungry travelers

***  10 Cheeses Worth Traveling For

***  The Secret to Booking a Cruise at a Deep Discount

***  Swimming Upstream – Freshwater Fish in a Warming World

***  America’s elk migration

***  15 Cool and Unusual Hotel Lobby Features

***  New United Plan Puts Profit Ahead of Passengers

***  Fodor’s 10 Best US Ski Resorts for Families

***  Restoring your faith in mankind, From Jack Duggan:

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: November  2013

Michigan’s Dequindre Cut Greenway

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer service opportunities, Shawnee National Forest, Harrisburg, Illinois

2.)  Volunteer Project, Lapolosa Wilderness, Enkpsini Wilderness Experience, South Africa

3.)  Climb Leader, Mazamas, Portland OR

4.)  Volunteer Long Trail Patrol, Green Mountain Club, Waterbury Ctr, VT

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Senior Director, Corporate Relations, National Wildlife Federation, Reston, VA

2.) Senior Manager, Corporate Relations, National Wildlife Federation, Reston, VA

3.)  Development Officer, Foundation Relations, World Wildlife Fund, Washington, D.C.

4.)  Marketing and Communications Manager, Discover Prince William & Manassas, Manassas, Virginia

5.)  Senior Program Officer, Forestry and Climate Change, African Wildlife Federation, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Kinshasa, DRC

6.)  Guest Services Manager – Worldmark Bison Ranch, Overgaard, AZ

7.)  Communications and Outreach Manager, American Prairie Reserve, Bozeman, Montana

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel:

 

December 6-12 – Abu Dhabi, UAE

 

January 18-25, 2014 — Copemhagen, Denmark; Karlskrona, Sweden; Gothenberg, Sweden; Stockholm, Sweden.

 

January 25-28, 2014 — Helsinki, Finland

 

January 28 – February 1, 2014 — Portsmouth, UK

 

March 17 – 20, 2014 — Accra, Ghana

 

***  From Barbara Lundquist:

 

I found a cool google deforestaion map. It’s interacvtive, too.  Here’s a story on it:

 

***  Google Launches World’s First High-Resolution Interactive Map of Global Deforestation

 

by Lidija Grozdanic

 

Google Earth just launched the first high-resolution map of global deforestation. The project was developed in collaboration with the University of Maryland, NASA and USGS by analyzing 654,178 Landsat images from the last ten years. The interactive map (http://earthenginepartners.appspot.com/science-2013-global-forest) will hopefully make a difference in fighting deforestation – especially since studies have shown that tropical forest loss is increasing by 2,101 square kilometers (811 square miles) each year.

 

http://inhabitat.com/google-launches-worlds-first-high-resolution-interactive-map-of-global-deforestation/#ixzz2l0kfLSyJ

 

***  Illegal lumber – Wood you buy?

 

http://www.wri.org/blog/lumber-liquidators-raid-shows-companies-need-heed-us-lacey-act

 

***  Here’s a neat sports park reusing packing materials to create trick spots

 

http://inhabitat.com/crazy-extreme-sports-park-combines-snowboarding-organic-food-and-repurposed-shipping-containers-in-vegas/

 

***  The Radisson Blu Hotel’s 82-Foot Aquadom Aquarium Brings Sea-Life and Scuba Diving to Berlin

 

by Diane Pham

 

‘Scuba diving in Germany’ isn’t usually penned into many tourists’ to-do lists — for obvious reasons — but at the Radisson Blu Hotel in Berlin this far-fetched idea becomes a reality with their towering Aquadom aquarium.

 

Read more:

 

http://inhabitat.com/the-radisson-blu-hotels-82-foot-aquadom-aquarium-brings-sea-life-and-scuba-diving-to-berlin/

 

***  From Business Travel News:  BTN’s 2013 Airline Survey: Follow The Leader

 

http://www.businesstravelnews.com/Business-Travel-Research/BTN-s-2013-Airline-Survey–Follow-The-Leader/?ib=Airlines&a=btn&cid=eltrDaily

 

***  Fodors: Where to Go This Winter

 

We’ve compiled our favorite picks for a cold-weather escape, whether you fancy zooming down the slopes, sipping hot toddies by the fire, or enjoying culinary and cultural hotspots like Houston and Cape Town. Bonus: If you travel during the first few weeks of January, you’re likely to score great deals on hotels and airfare.

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/where-to-go-this-winter?ref=news_fd_112313

 

***  More charging stations added at airports for power-hungry travelers

 

http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/flights/2013/11/20/airport-power-electric-outlet-charging-station/3641489/

 

***  10 Cheeses Worth Traveling For

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-cheeses-worth-traveling-for?ref=news_fd_112313#!1-intro

 

***  The Secret to Booking a Cruise at a Deep Discount

 

http://lifestylejournal.com/the-secret-to-booking-a-cruise-at-a-deep-discount/?ref=ob&ad_id=19084756

 

***  Swimming Upstream – Freshwater Fish in a Warming World

 

http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/Media-Center/Reports/Archive/2013/09-04-13-Freshwater-Fish-Climate-Change-Report.aspx

 

***  America’s elk migration

 

Elk are naturally a migratory species.  If the seasons are mild,  with little variation between their winter and summer climates, they might not migrate.  For example, Roosevelt Elk found in the Pacific Coast regions in California, Oregon and Washington States do not migrate.   But other subspecies of elk in North America migrate—between high elevations in the summer and lower in the winter—up to a 100 miles.  Elk are often referred to by their native name, wapiti.  A herd is actually called a gang.

 

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/elk/

 

Tom and I camped during the summer in a large plain that was a wintering ground for elk in the Gros Ventres valley in Wyoming.  Elk bones were everywhere.

 

The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem elk herd numbers over 200,000 individuals and during the spring and fall, they take part in the longest elk migration in the continental U.S. Elk in the southern regions of Yellowstone National Park and in the surrounding National Forests migrate south towards the town of Jackson, Wyoming where they winter for up to six months on the National Elk Refuge. Conservationists there ensure the herd is well fed during the harsh winters.

 

Many of the elk that reside in the northern sections of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem migrate to lower altitudes in Montana, mainly to the north and west.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elk

 

While in the Gros Ventres wilderness, Tom and I worked with fellow Scouts participating in the 2008 ArrowCorps 5 service project in Bridger-Teton National Forest, removing barbed wire from rangeland so the elk and pronghorn antelope can follow their migratory routes.

 

“In the Pinedale Ranger District of the forest, the Dutch Joe Fence Removal project will remove five miles of fence that will then be packed out on a mule string.   This project takes place at Dutch Joe which is south of Pinedale, Wyoming.  2-5 miles of fence will be removed from remote sites in the Dutch Joe area resulting in wildlife habitat enhancement.”

 

***  15 Cool and Unusual Hotel Lobby Features

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/15-cool-and-unusual-hotel-lobby-features#!1-intro

 

***  New United Plan Puts Profit Ahead of Passengers

 

United today unveiled a plan to cut costs by $2 billion annually, and increase ancillary revenue by $700 million. Conspicuously missing: anything benefiting its customers.

http://www.frequentflier.com/blog/new-united-plan-puts-profit-ahead-of-passengers/

 

***  Fodor’s 10 Best US Ski Resorts for Families

 

These 10 resorts across the country have a reputation for being especially kind to kin. Not only will kids of all ages be happy, there’s plenty for parents to enjoy, too.

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-best-us-ski-resorts-for-families?ref=news_fd_112313#!1-intro

 

***  Restoring your faith in mankind, From Jack Duggan:

 

Ned –

 

Not, perhaps, the most dramatic travel story, but certainly anxiety-provoking for a  few hours.

 

With my youngest son I arrived at the Rogue Valley/Medford International Airport (yes, locals laugh at the “international” designation) with plenty of time.  We checked in and I tucked my I.D. into my shirt pocket.  I set my coat on the back of a chair, my bag beside me.  They called the flight and I got up and went through security.

 

We were flying to L.A. where I was to appear as a contestant on Wheel of Fortune (show will air Jan. 23, 2014).  As we touched down at LAX I thought, “Where’s my jacket?”  With my wallet, my cash and my credit cards!  Most important, my Social Security I.D., required of contestants on WoF, was in that wallet.  As my mind backtracked, I realized I had left the jacket hanging on the chair in the Medford Airport.  ULP!

 

I turned my phone on when we reached the terminal and there was a message from my wife; my jacket had been turned in and was being held for me in Medford.  But I still had no Social Security I.D., no credit cards and only the cash in my pocket.

 

At the hotel I somewhat sheepishly explained the situation to the manager and used their cash machine (that card I keep with me) to pay for our lodging.  Then I called my brother, who is also my tax preparer, and he faxed me Social Security documents.

 

I can’t reveal the outcome of my appearance on WoF, but I can’t wonder if it mightn’t have been different.  If only….

 

Walk in Peace – Jack

 

***  How about you?  Any wardrobe advice for fellow flyers?

Any interesting stories while going through security?

 

Send to Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: November  2013

Michigan’s Dequindre Cut Greenway

By Laura Stark

 

“It went from a really crazy idea to a world-class community asset.”

 

Everyone has heard about Detroit’s troubles: the bankruptcy, the population decline, abandoned buildings and urban decay. What’s not often heard is the story of the strength, resilience and pride of Detroiters. Underneath the rubble of bad press, hope grows as a revitalized riverfront and developing trail system are changing the way people think about the Motor City. A signature component of this movement, the Dequindre Cut Greenway, is itself a Cinderella story.

 

“Detroit is not some dying city that nobody wants to be in,” says Eric Oberg, trail development manager in the Midwest Regional Office of Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC). “That’s not the narrative on the ground there. We can’t say that everything is rainbows and unicorns; there are problems, but people are facing those problems, not dwelling on them.”

 

The Dequindre Cut—once a haven for derelicts and drug activity and now a well-loved showpiece with a uniquely Detroit flavor—is the epitome of this sentiment. The “Cut” is a wide trench in downtown Detroit, just over a mile long, that was sunk 25 feet below street level in the 1920s by the Grand Trunk Railroad to avoid foot and vehicle traffic, which continued overhead unimpeded on more than a dozen bridges. Passenger and freight service was discontinued on the line in the early-to-mid 1980s and the corridor sat vacant. Weeds and underbrush took over, and trash littered the way.

 

“The immediate universal reaction to the idea of building a trail there was, ‘You are out of your freaking mind,'” recalls Tom Woiwode, director of the GreenWays Initiative of the Community Foundation of Southeast Michigan.

 

Yet, anchored by two of the city’s cultural and historical touchstones, the corridor held promise. At its northern end was Eastern Market, a commercial district centered around a six-block farmers market in operation since 1891. At the other end was the Detroit River, a key part of the Great Lakes system and an international border (counterintuitively, you have to go south from Detroit to enter Canada).

 

This was not the first time Woiwode had faced an uphill battle. In 1999, he had the vision of using greenways to connect 250 municipalities within the seven-county area that included and surrounded Detroit. The program he developed, the GreenWays Initiative, was the first of its kind in the country. The effort was launched in 2001 with the Community Foundation of Southeast Michigan setting out to raise $25 million from the private sector to leverage $50 million in public dollars for the design, planning, and funding of greenways in the region.

 

RTC supported the effort, compiling a report on the abandoned rail corridors in the greater Detroit region that could potentially be converted into rail-trails. At first, not everyone was on board. “There was a sizeable push-back by a number of foundations,” says Woiwode. “They said ‘Detroit is the Motor City. You’re never going to be able to build trails here.'”

 

But enthusiasm for the idea grew and eventually the organization surpassed even its most ambitious goals. One of the projects that was partially funded by the GreenWays Initiative was the Dequindre Cut. The trail’s pavement was laid in the 2008 and, although it wasn’t officially opened yet, Woiwode recalls the high sense of anticipation. “I would be standing on a bridge looking over the construction site and would see people crawling over the barricades because they were so excited by how cool this thing was.” When the greenway opened the following summer, “It went from a really crazy idea to a world-class community asset.”

 

To help allay fears, the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy, stewards of the trail, installed a series of emergency call boxes and security cameras along the route, and created a uniformed security force to patrol the Cut and adjacent Detroit RiverWalk by foot and bike. Today, Marc Pasco, communications director for the organization says, “Crime along the riverfront and the Dequindre Cut is virtually nonexistent.”

 

Not only was the new trail a safe and useful link through the city, it offered something not found elsewhere: The graffiti-covered walls along the Cut were left alone by the trail’s proponents.

 

“The artwork is a local stamp that lets Detroiters know that this is us, this is who we are, this is our trail,” says Oberg. “The graffiti along the trail makes a big impact that people get. The artwork is prominent, not subtle, and makes an impression.”

 

Prior to the greenway’s opening, the revitalization of city’s riverfront—which the Dequindre Cut would eventually link to—paved the way for change. “Ten years ago, the Detroit riverfront wasn’t a very attractive place,” says Pasco. “There were abandoned buildings, weeded lots, cement silos, and it offered very little public access to the river.”

 

Momentum took off when the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy formed in 2003. Through a public/private partnership with the City of Detroit, General Motors, the Kresge Foundation, and others, the area has been reclaimed for the public good, generating thousands of jobs and an annual spending along the riverfront of $43.7 million, according to an economic impact study published just this year.

 

The RiverWalk, at the southern end of the Dequindre Cut, connects to Milliken State Park, numerous plazas and pocket parks, and the Renaissance Center, a cluster of seven skyscrapers serving as General Motors’ world headquarters, as well as a massive shopping, dining, lodging, and entertainment complex.

 

Soon, both the RiverWalk and the Dequindre Cut Greenway will be expanding. “When we first started talking about the Dequindre Cut, a lot of people were skeptical,” says Todd Scott, the Detroit greenways coordinator for Michigan Trails and Greenways Alliance. “They thought no one would use it, but now people keep asking, ‘When are you going to make it longer?'”

 

The answer is fall 2014. A northern extension of the greenway is currently underway that will add just shy of a mile of trail along the former railroad corridor up to Mack Avenue.

 

“I’ve lived in Southeast Michigan my entire life,” says Pasco. “I’ve seen it through not so great times, but things are starting to transform. There’s an electricity in the air now that you can almost feel, a sense of vibrancy and urgency in Detroit that’s been missing for a long time.”

 

Oberg, who met with the city’s trail advocates and planners this summer felt it, too. “The take-away from our visit was that Detroit is not going to stay down,” he says. “There’s a lot of positive energy and good things going on there. It’s a wonderful American city.”

 

Grade: The trail itself is relatively flat, but runs through a corridor 25 feet below street level.

 

Getting There: Detroit Metro Airport (1 Detroit Metropolitan Airport Tram) sits about 20 miles southwest of the trail.

 

Access and Parking: Free parking is available at Rivard Plaza, one block west of William G. Milliken State Park. From the lot, take the Detroit RiverWalk east along Atwater Street to the start of the Dequindre Cut Greenway.

 

To navigate the area with an interactive GIS map, and to see more photos, user reviews and ratings, plus loads of other trip-planning information, visit RTC’s free trail-finder website, TrailLink.com.

 

Rentals: Bicycle rentals—cruisers, hybrids, road bikes, and tandems—are available along the RiverWalk from Wheelhouse Detroit (1340 E. Atwater Street; info@wheelhousedetroit.com; 313-656-2453). Helmets and locks are included, and accessories such as baby seats and trailers are also available. A variety of guided tours are available from the shop as well.

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer service opportunities, Shawnee National Forest, Harrisburg, Illinois

 

Join the Shawnee Volunteer Corps !

 

Volunteers with many different skills are needed to assist with the various programs on the Shawnee National Forest. Volunteer opportunities vary in length, type of skill required, and even where they are located (outside on the trails or in the office at a desk).

 

Public involvement plays an important part in managing our national forest lands. The Shawnee National Forest relies more and more on volunteers to assist with campgrounds and other programs.  Concerned citizens help the forest to provide better wildlife habitat, identify and preserve historic sites, and build and maintain trails. Read the latest news about the Shawnee Volunteer Corps in the Volunteer Vibe newsletter.  There are numerous volunteer trail improvement projects offered through out the year. College Groups are welcome to complete our Alternative Spring Break Application so that we can plan and organize their volunteer experience.

 

For more information about volunteering for specific projects on the forest, contact the Shawnee Volunteer Corps at (618) 833- 8576 extension 115 or email at shawneevolunteercorps@yahoo.com.

http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/shawnee/home/?cid=fsm9_038600

 

2.)  Volunteer Project, Lapolosa Wilderness, Enkpsini Wilderness Experience, South Africa

http://www.enkosini.org/LapolosaWilderness.htm

 

3.)  Climb Leader, Mazamas, Portland OR

 

Our climb leaders go through a rigorous training program that teaches both hard skills of technical climbing and the soft skills of managing a climb team.

 

For complete details, see the Climb Leader Development pages (http://www.mazamas.org/your/adventure/starts-here/C85/).

 

A vital part of the Mazamas mission is to provide climbing opportunities for Mazamas members and non-members. These climbs depend on the volunteer efforts of climb leaders. The history of the Mazamas is one of a proud tradition of volunteerism, leading climbs in the Northwest and beyond for well over a century. While the Mazamas are not a guide service, all climb leaders receive training at the highest standards. This training is monitored and encouraged through the Mazamas Climb Leader Development Program.  The purpose of the Leadership Development Program is to provide sufficient training and learning opportunities for the development of climb leaders for Mazama activities.

 

A leader is a member whose skills and experience are considered to be adequate for assuming the formal leadership role for an activity. The leader is NOT a commercial guide and Mazamas provides no certification to a leader. Leaders have some expenses reimbursed, but are NOT paid for their role.

 

A leader is expected to have sufficient technical skills in mountaineering to comfortably complete the routes he/she leads.  Required skill levels will vary depending on the difficulty of routes the leader wants to climb.

 

A leader is expected to have both studied and demonstrated in the field basic accident management and rescue skills appropriate to the climb being led. First aid skills appropriate to mountaineering are required.

 

Experience is a key element for a qualified leader. As a general rule, a climber is expected to have completed at least a dozen climbs before applying to the program.  No list of criteria alone is sufficient to ensure any individual is appropriate to be a leader for the Mazamas. The Climbing Committee will always use their judgment in appointing leaders.

 

The Mazamas climb leadership development program is designed to:

•Provide opportunities for candidates to develop leadership skills and additional mountaineering experience.

•Increase candidates visibility within the Mazamas, increasing opportunities to meet as many leaders and members as possible.

•Allow the maximum number of leaders to view and critique the climbing and leadership skills of the candidate.

•Provide a standardized review base for evaluating a candidate’s leadership development; ensuring the level of leadership proficiency expected by the Mazamas.

 

http://www.mazamas.org/your/adventure/starts-here/C5/

 

4.)  Volunteer Long Trail Patrol, Green Mountain Club, Waterbury Ctr, VT

 

Run away and join the trail crew for a week! Meet new people – all ages, backgrounds, and from all over the U.S. and the world. Camp out in the Vermont mountains. Learn how to build and maintain hiking trails – or, if you’re already an experienced trail maintainer, practice your skills on some neat projects.

 

The crew is made up of 8 – 10 volunteers each week led by experienced paid staff. The GMC will provide food, group camping gear, tools, skills training, and pretty good times. This crew works every year from mid- July through late September. A minimum of one week commitment is required, although people can choose to stay longer!

 

To apply, just use the standard volunteer application. To learn about our sister volunteer trail crews on other parts of the Appalachian Trail go to Appalachian Trail Conservancy web page.

 

For more details about the volunteer crew see Long Trail Patrol and Outdoor Leadership.

 

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/page.php?id=181

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Senior Director, Corporate Relations, National Wildlife Federation, Reston, VA

http://www.nwf.org/How-to-Help/Jobs-at-NWF/Search-Openings.aspx

 

2.) Senior Manager, Corporate Relations, National Wildlife Federation, Reston, VA

http://www.nwf.org/How-to-Help/Jobs-at-NWF/Search-Openings.aspx

 

3.)  Development Officer, Foundation Relations, World Wildlife Fund, Washington, D.C.

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=396900015

 

4.)  Marketing and Communications Manager, Discover Prince William & Manassas, Manassas, Virginia

http://www.jobtarget.com/c/job.cfm?job=15575603

 

5.)  Senior Program Officer, Forestry and Climate Change, African Wildlife Federation, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Kinshasa, DRC

http://www.awf.org/about/careers/senior-program-officer-forestry-and-climate-change

 

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

6.)  Guest Services Manager – Worldmark Bison Ranch, Overgaard, AZ

http://bit.ly/19pQWWt

 

7.)  Communications and Outreach Manager, American Prairie Reserve, Bozeman, Montana

http://www.jobtarget.com/c/job.cfm?job=15611912

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for October 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for October 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness.”
John Muir

 

“Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so.”

― Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Any interesting stories while going through security?

***  China report from Bill Ryerson

***  Top 10 Food Festivals You’ve Never Heard Of

***  19 Idiotic (But Real) Travel Complaints

***  Festivals of the world: where to go in November

***  Four Things NOT to Do With Your Passport

***  27 Solid Reasons Why Palm Springs is the Bomb Diggity

***  Roadkill Permits? There Will Be an App for That

***  Fodor’s 100: World’s Best Budget Hotels of 2013

***  Some of the best High Adventure opportunities—including volunteer opportunities and employment—are at Boy Scout High Adventure bases:

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer Opportunities, 2013-2014 winter programs, Outdoors for All Foundation, Seattle WA

2.)  Volunteer position, Evening Lantern Tour at Carriage Hill MetroPark, Five Rivers MetroParks, Dayton, Ohio

3.)  Recreation Services Internship, Outdoors for All Foundation, Seattle WA

 

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Recreation Program Coordinator, Austin Parks and Recreation Department, Austin, Texas

2.)  Director, Outdoor Connections, Five Rivers MetroParks, Dayton, Ohio

3.)  AmeriCorps Leadership and Conservation Corpsmember, Mile High Youth Corps, Denver, Colorado

4.)  AS Outdoor Center Marketing Resources Coordinator 2013-2014, Western Washington University. Bellingham, WA

5.)  Assistant Director of Campus Life and Director of Outdoor Education, Colby College, Waterville, ME

6.)  Center Director, Strawberry Plains Audubon Center, National Audubon Society, Holly Springs, Mississippi

7.)  Berkshire Outdoor Center Assistant Director, YMCA, Becket, MA

8.)  Professional Outdoor Instructor , Bradford Woods Outdoor Center – Martinsville, IN

9.)  Part time Orienteering & Geocaching Instructor – Spring 2014, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

11.)  Communications Technician – Antarctica, GHG Corporation, United States

12.)  Elk Camp Snowcat Operator, Aspen Skiing Company, Aspen, CO

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

 

***  How about you?  Any wardrobe advice for fellow flyers?

Any interesting stories while going through security?

 

Send to Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

***  China report from Bill Ryerson:

 

Hi Ned,

 

I just spoke yesterday at the Climate Change Communications Conference, sponsored by the Yale Climate Change Communications project of the Yale University Forestry School and the China Center for Climate Change Communication. Despite the finger pointing at China for now being the world’s biggest emitter of greenhouse gasses, the country is doing a lot to combat climate change. In some ways, China may be the world’s best hope for innovations to address global warming. There are tree planting initiatives that include giving gifts of trees planted in someone’s honor during events like major birthdays as carbon offsets, and activities by the Environmental Protection Volunteers Association to reduce emissions that make China a beacon for innovations in fighting climate change.

 

I’m not here on tourism, but Beijing has continued to modernize, and the new airport is very efficient and quite beautiful. Population Media Center is here planning a soap opera to reduce demand for ivory by Chinese consumers and to address climate change and other key issues.

 

Best wishes,

Bill

 

***  Top 10 Food Festivals You’ve Never Heard Of

 

Now that the Food Network has profiled everything from chili cook-offs to Gilroy’s Garlic Festival you probably think you’ve seen it all when it comes to food festivals. Well, think again! These 10 festivals are guaranteed fun, and we’ve even included a story from SuccessfulMeetings.com to help you get started planning.

 

1. Biscuit Festival: Knoxville, TN

 

2. Loaf ‘N Jug Chile & Frijoles Festival: Pueblo, CO

 

3. Dudie Burger Festival: Tupelo, MS

 

4. Barbecue Festival: Lexington, NC

 

5. RC and Moonpie Festival: Shelbyville, TN

 

6. Happy Harry’s Rib Fest: Fargo, ND

 

7. Soul Food Cook-Off: Muskogee, OK

 

8. Gingerbread House Festival: Provo, UT

 

9. Oregon Truffle Festival: Eugene, OR

 

10. Tomato Festival: Newark, OH

 

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/Top-10-Food-Festivals-You-ve-Never-Heard-Of/?cid=eltrTop10

 

***  19 Idiotic (But Real) Travel Complaints

 

A trip is supposed to be your time away from the crazy. Remind me never to travel to any of the same vacation spots these people have booked! These are actual complaints received from dissatisfied customers by Thomas Cook Vacations, via the Huffington Post, via Meeting News:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/blogdramedy/idiotic-travel-complaints_b_4073107.html

 

***  Festivals of the world: where to go in November

 

From Lonely Planet’s A Year of Festivals.

 

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/caribbean/travel-tips-and-articles/77491#ixzz2hhAND6nV

 

***  Four Things NOT to Do With Your Passport

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2013/10/18/6039/7129/travel/Four+Things+NOT+to+Do+With+Your+Passport

 

***  27 Solid Reasons Why Palm Springs is the Bomb Diggity

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2012/12/27/35712/263/travel/27+Solid+Reasons+Why+Palm+Springs+is+the+Bomb+Diggity

 

***  Roadkill Permits? There Will Be an App for That

 

By MATT VOLZ Associated Press

http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/roadkill-permits-app-20526348

 

***  Fodor’s 100: World’s Best Budget Hotels of 2013

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/fodors-100-worlds-best-budget-hotels-of-2013?ref=news_fd_101213#!1-intro

 

***  Some of the best High Adventure opportunities—including volunteer opportunities and employment—are at Boy Scout High Adventure bases:

 

Florida National High Adventure Sea Base, Islamorada, FL

http://bsaseabase.org/Resources/Employment.aspx

 

Northern Tier National High Adventure Program, Ely, MN

http://www.ntier.org/

 

Philmont Scout Ranch, Cimarron, NM

 

Each season, Philmont Scout Ranch employs more than 1,000 staff members to operate and support Philmont’s program, Training Center, food service,  ranching museums and maintenance and to assist the administrative staff. A wide variety of paid positions are available, including Rangers, Backcountry Program Counselors and Training Center and base camp support staff.

 

The majority of contracts coincide with the summer season, from late May through mid-August. However, some temporary positions are available that support the spring, fall, and winter programs. All staff members, no matter what their job is or where they work, have a very important role to play in the total success of Philmont.

 

http://www.philmontscoutranch.org/

 

Chilkoot High Adventure Base, Great Alaska Council Boy Scouts of America and the International Wilderness Leadership School, Haines, AK

http://alaskascoutingadventures.org/

 

Teton High Adventure Base, Great Salt Lake Council, Jackson, WY

http://www.gslc-bsa.org/teton-high-adventure-base/27545

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: October 2013

Illinois’ Old Plank Road Trail

By Laura Stark

 

“We knew it was a darn good thing worth putting up the good fight for.”

 

 

Traveling along the tranquil Old Plank Road Trail today, you would never know the site was once the cause of heated debate and a contentious struggle lasting 20 years. The paved 22-mile rail-trail now offers a canopy of oak trees and sugar maples rustling overhead, delicate prairie grasses that stir with the passage of bicyclists, and soft purple wildflowers that peek up through the green underbrush.

 

The dream for this idyllic path in the southern suburbs of Chicago began in the mid-1970s, when the railroad line upon which the trail now rests was formally abandoned. By the end of the decade, locals were already casually using the corridor for nature hikes. The effort to fully convert it to a biking and walking path was championed by the Forest Preserve District of Will County, but as the trail plan took shape in the 1980s, they faced a big hurdle – the public perception of what developing a trail would mean.

 

“At that time, the county was fairly rural,” says Ralph Schultz, director of planning and operations for the district. “There were a lot of misunderstandings about what the trail would be, who it would serve, and what it would cost.”

 

John Joyce remembers feeling the heat at presentations he gave about the project to drum up support. “The townships would have public meetings to involve the public on decisions about the trail,” he says. “Some people hated the trail. They thought people would come into the neighborhood, steal things out of their homes, and go down the trail to make their escape.”

 

Newly arrived from Minnesota, Joyce had become familiar with the emerging trend of rails-to-trails after hearing about Wisconsin’s Elroy-Sparta State Trail that opened in 1967. He worked as director of parks and recreation for Park Forest, one of the communities along the trail, retiring just last year after nearly four decades of service.

 

Though the project had its vocal opponents, support for the trail was steadfastly building. “When the meeting was over and people were filing out, someone who lived along the trail would always come up to speak to you quietly about the project,” recalls Joyce.

 

A united front was created in 1988 when the Old Plank Road Trail Management Commission was formed. Consisting of the city and county governments along the right-of-way, the group still meets regularly on topics affecting the entire trail. Recently, a friends group supporting the rail-trail has formed to assist with trail cleanup and beautification, including adding benches and signage. In recognition of these efforts, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC) is providing financial support to the friends group through its Metropolitan Grants Program, sponsored by The Coca-Cola Foundation.

 

In 1992, the land for the trail was acquired from Penn Central Railroad. And after two decades of planning and perseverance, its first 12 miles—from Park Forest to Hickory Creek Forest Preserve—was completed in 1997. A highlight of the grand opening was a 24-foot-long cake decorated to look like the new trail.

 

Construction continued over the next several years on three more short sections before its planned 22 miles were fully realized. Today, the trail is one of the most widely visited in the state, according to data collected by statewide trail counts conducted last summer by Trails for Illinois in partnership with RTC.

 

“We had a counter on the Old Plank in Frankfort, and it recorded the highest annual use of any trail in Illinois that we surveyed,” says Eric Oberg, trail development manager for RTC’s Midwest
Regional Office. “We looked at a lot of major trail systems in the state, but the Old Plank had the highest annual usage by far: 127,000.” The next most-used trail was the Fox River Trail, with 86,500.

 

Frankfort is the trail’s physical, and spiritual, center. The pathway runs through its historic downtown with many charming shops and restaurants within easy reach. A bustling Sunday farmer’s market offers locally grown produce and homemade baked goods, May through October. And, as one enters town, a beautiful archway emblazoned with the trail’s name curves overhead, a welcoming sight.

 

Oddly, the trail gets its name from something that never was. A wooden boardwalk stretching from Joliet to the Indiana border was planned in 1851, but never came to fruition. It was part of a short-lived transportation craze across the U.S. of wooden toll-roads that at first seemed a vast improvement over the crude dirt pathways of the day. But wood—subject to rot, warpage, and general wear and tear—proved too difficult and expensive to maintain as a roadway, and the trend sputtered out.

 

The corridor was put to better use in 1855, when trains begin running on the newly built Michigan Central Railroad. “They shipped products of agriculture: corn, soybeans, and wheat,” says Bill Molony, president of the Blackhawk Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society. “Even today, it’s a strong agricultural area. By avoiding Chicago, they saved time and expense, so the railroad became known as the Joliet Cutoff.”

 

Though these trains have been replaced by trail traffic, a number of railroads nearby are thriving. In Park Forest, just a stone’s throw from the Old Plank Road Trail, rail fans are salivating over the new Rail Fan Park, where, from a raised observation platform, visitors can see something extraordinary. Here, a rare cloverleaf interchange for trains was needed at the intersection of two major rail routes, one going east-west and the other north-south.

 

“At that location, any train can change to any direction,” says Molony, “It gives more flexibility to their whole system.” Both freight trains and Metra and Amtrak passenger lines currently utilize the tracks.

 

Robert Gunther, director for Park Forest’s recreation and parks department describes Canadian National Railway as “a good neighbor” in helping the community develop the two-acre site, which includes interpretive signage on the railroad industry and history in the area, a bright red 60-year-old caboose, and native vegetation that railroad travelers would have seen from their windows in the late 1800s.

 

“The north-south line is elevated, so it comes around on the loop going down to grade level and crosses under itself,” says Gunther. “It’s interesting to watch the dynamics of the movements.”

 

With beautiful views, an interesting new attraction, and wide community usage and support, what could be next for the trail?

 

“On its western end, Joliet is developing a multi-modal center,” says Schultz. “The Forest Preserve has four different trails that come into Joliet. The center will become ground zero for all of our transportation systems.”

 

The new center—a state-of-the-art hub for rail, intercity buses, community shuttles, cars, bicycles, and pedestrians—will be built adjacent to a building from another era, the grand Joliet Union Station dating back to 1912.

 

“Having such a major trail artery connecting to that center, enhances it as a multi-modal transit facility,” says Oberg. “It opens up the trail for more visitor use because you could get on a train from anywhere and get to Joliet. Joliet could be a launching point for one heck of a bike vacation.”

 

Things are busy at the other end of the trail as well. “There are discussions of taking the trail to Chicago Heights,” says Schultz. If completed, the extension would reach the Thorn Creek Trail and, eventually, connect into the northwestern Indiana and Chicago lakefront trail networks.

 

“The Chicago Heights connection is not long, only a mile or two, but the impact long-term would be huge,” says Oberg.

 

Nearly 40 years since it was first envisioned, the well-loved and growing Old Plank Road Trail has proved its value. “I’m proud of the fact that we stuck with it,” says Joyce. “We knew it was a darn good thing worth putting up the good fight for.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer Opportunities, 2013-2014 winter programs, Outdoors for All Foundation, Seattle WA

http://www.outdoorsforall.org/documents/Programs/Volunteer_guide_web.pdf

 

2.)  Volunteer position, Evening Lantern Tour at Carriage Hill MetroPark, Five Rivers MetroParks, Dayton, Ohio

http://www.metroparks.org/GetInvolved/GetInvolved.aspx

 

3.)  Recreation Services Internship, Outdoors for All Foundation, Seattle WA

http://www.outdoorsforall.org/documents/Employment/Internships_Recreation.pdf

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Recreation Program Coordinator, Austin Parks and Recreation Department, Austin, Texas

http://careercenter.nrpa.org/jobs/#/detail/5741479/

 

2.)  Director, Outdoor Connections, Five Rivers MetroParks, Dayton, Ohio

http://www.metroparks.org/AboutUs/Careers.aspx

 

3.)  AmeriCorps Leadership and Conservation Corpsmember, Mile High Youth Corps, Denver, Colorado

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=399800026

 

4.)  AS Outdoor Center Marketing Resources Coordinator 2013-2014, Western Washington University. Bellingham, WA

https://jobs.wwu.edu/JobPosting.aspx?JPID=4002

 

5.)  Assistant Director of Campus Life and Director of Outdoor Education, Colby College, Waterville, ME

http://www.colby.edu/administration_cs/humanresources/employment/asst_dir_camus_life_dir_outdoor_ed_9_2013.cfm

 

6.)  Center Director, Strawberry Plains Audubon Center, National Audubon Society, Holly Springs, Mississippi

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=395400013

 

7.)  Berkshire Outdoor Center Assistant Director, YMCA, Becket, MA

http://www.ymca.net/career-opportunities/open-positions.html?key=23514

 

8.)  Professional Outdoor Instructor , Bradford Woods Outdoor Center – Martinsville, IN

 

Outdoor Instructors needed for three separate 12-week seasons during the Spring, Summer, and Fall 2014. Bradford Woods is known internationally as Indiana University’s Outdoor Center. We are seeking experienced candidates to run programming for youth and adults. If you are looking for that next step to full-time professional work, then look no further. We offer programs in environmental and adventure education as well as some retreat opportunities. Instructors are cross-trained in these programs. We offer $250/week with meals while working, housing, utilities, Wi-Fi, and fitness center, all on a 2500 acre facility. The full job description as well as application information are posted on our website www.bradwoods.org\employment\field-instructor. Please submit a resume, cover letter, and complete application for consideration. For more information, contact Melanie Wills at mjwills@indiana.edu or phone  765-342-2915 .

 

NOTES: 12 openings.

 

http://careercenter.nrpa.org/jobs/5742044

 

*** From Mark Sofman:

 

9.)  Part time Orienteering & Geocaching Instructor – Spring 2014, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

http://bit.ly/H3lBCL

 

11.)  Communications Technician – Antarctica, GHG Corporation, United States

http://bit.ly/H3mDij

 

12.)  Elk Camp Snowcat Operator, Aspen Skiing Company, Aspen, CO

http://bit.ly/H3lZBm

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for September 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for September 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“In wilderness is the preservation of the world.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  National Wildlife Federation Hike & Seek

***  The Top 10 Beach Cities

***  Virginia Cleanup Events:

***  Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup:

***  Meet Rippl

***  Trail Cameras

***  Yeah, there’s a fee for that:

***  10 Best National Parks for Fall Trips

***  Best Geocaching Websites:

***  TSA Expands PreCheck to Sixty Additional Airports

***  Chiggers:

***  RANKED: The Best Airlines In America

***  The Top 10 Ways to Sleep on a Plane

***  10 Perfect Outfits for Long-Haul Flights

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: September 2013

California’s SMART Pathway

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer Opportunities, Rainsong Wildlife Sanctuary, Peninsula Nicoya, Costa Rica

2.)  Conservation Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., Tiburon, CA

3.)  Volunteering Opportunities, Busch Wildlife Sanctuary at Loxahatchee River District, Jupiter, FL

4.)  Husky Ranch Adventure, offered through Fronteering Travel Services Inc., Yukon, Canada

5.)  Volunteer opportunity, Keep our parks beautiful, City of Sacramento Volunteer Program, Sacramento, CA

 

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  SPECIAL EVENTS AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR), Arlington County, Arlington, VA

2.)  Vice President Communications and Public Relations, Travel Portland, Portland, OR

3.)  Media Relations Manager, National Audubon Society, Inc., NY, NY

4.)  Story and Communications Curator, Marine Mammal Center, Sausalito, California

5.)  Tour Guide, Cave of the Mounds, Blue Mounds, WI

6.)  Bear Tracking – Conservation Biology Volunteers, Ecuador, Andean Bear Foundation, United States

7.)  Development Officer, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Cortez, Colorado

8.)  Manager, Science Outreach Full-time, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC or Santa Cruz, CA

9.)  Manager, Digital Outreach and Fundraising, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  National Wildlife Federation Hike & Seek

 

Find one in your area:

 

www.hikeandseek.org

 

Here’s the one near Washington, D.C.

 

Seneca Creek State Park

11950 Clopper Road

Gaithersburg, MD

October 19th

 

* A family-friendly hike through Seneca Creek State Park, Gaithersburg, Maryland

* Hands-on crafts and activities for kids ages 3-10 along the trail

* A scavenger hunt

* Live wildlife displays

* A chance to meet and take pictures with Ranger Rick

* And so much more!

Your youngsters will LOVE the special activities we have in store for them, such as meeting live wildlife, making a take-home butterfly, pressing leaves, hunting for salamanders and more! All especially designed to thrill kids age 3-10; toddlers and their grown-ups.

 

See Hike and Seek volunteer opportunities here:

 

http://www.nwf.org/Hike-And-Seek/Volunteer.aspx

 

***  The Top 10 Beach Cities

 

By Kate Mulcrone

 

National Geographic has pulled together this list of can’t-miss beach towns around the world. We’ve also included some stories to help you plan a meeting in one of these fabulous locales.

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/The-Top-10-Beach-Cities/?cid=eltrTop10

 

***  Virginia Cleanup Events:

 

Virginia Waterways Cleanup event (part of the International Coastal Cleanup) coordinates more than 200 cleanup events in September and October in Virginia — from the mountains to the ocean.  Last year more than 7,400 volunteers cleaned our waterways   keeping 491,505 POUNDS of plastic and trash out of Virginia’s rivers, bays and our world’s ocean! Join us at a cleanup this fall — You will not only feel good that you are making a positive difference, but the data you collect will be put to work in changing the littering behaviors of people sharing our earth.   Sign up by going to http://www.longwood.edu/cleanva/CleanupEvents2013.html and finding a cleanup that is convenient for you.

 

***  Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup:

 

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/our-work/marine-debris/

 

***  Meet Rippl

 

Rippl is a free mobile application that helps you make simple, sustainable lifestyle choices.

 

With Rippl, you’ll get:

 

•Free green living tips to help improve your day-to-day habits

 

•Ability to set goals and track your progress to show your impact

 

•Customizable alerts to help you succeed based on your needs, schedule and habits

 

•Science-based recommendations for proven ways to help grow a healthy environment

 

•Opportunity to suggest your own tips to the community and share your success with your friends

 

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/do-your-part/rippl.html

 

***  Trail Cameras

 

For land trusts and other land conservation organizations, trail cameras, also called game cameras, scouting cameras, or camera traps, can be effective ways to “see” what’s happening on your conservation land when you’re not there. Typical uses for these automated watchers include:

• search for and document cryptic wildlife such as bobcat
• determine deer population density
• count visitors/users
• deter illicit activity/identify people engaged in illicit activity (dumping, ATVs, poaching)

 

Some conservationists have been reluctant to take advantage of these cameras’ potential because of uncertainty about the legality of such surveillance. RI Natural History Survey (RINHS) with assistance from the Land Trust Alliance and the RI Land Trust Council investigated the legal issues involved in remote surveillance on conservation land in Rhode Island.

 

http://rinhs.org/partners-resources/trail-cameras/

 

***  Yeah, there’s a fee for that:

 

Ryanair agreed to accept American Express cards for a fee “of 2 percent of the total transaction value” on top of other booking fees. The Irish low-cost carrier cast the move as a play to gain more bookings from “business travelers, travel agents and corporate travel departments,” according to a statement attributed to deputy chief executive and CFO Howard Millar. He estimated that “20 percent to 25 percent of our passengers are traveling on business” and hinted at further plans to “roll out a range of business-tailored services.”

http://www.businesstravelnews.com/Expense-Management/Ryanair-agreed-to-accept-American-Express-cards-for-a-fee–of-2-percent-of-the-total-transaction-value–on-top-of-other-booking-fees/?ib=Airlines&a=mgmt&cid=eltrDaily

 

***  10 Best National Parks for Fall Trips

 

This is Ned’s favorite time of the year!

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-best-national-parks-for-fall-trips?ref=news_fd_091413#!1-intro

 

***  Best Geocaching Websites:

 

Ned’s comment:  My geocaching experience involved one excurion deep into the Wasatch mountains.  I found the cache, but more memorable was the water ouzel I saw.  I really haven’t used my Garmin GPS since.

 

http://outdoors.campmor.com/best-geocaching-websites/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=2013_09_06_Campmor_2013&cm_pla=52134&cm_ven=EMAIL#fbid=OsOFUai_NGFFor Defence Global

 

***  Welcome news:

 

TSA Expands PreCheck to Sixty Additional Airports

 

By Matt Alderton

 

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Conference-News/Event-Management-Compaines/Articles/TSA-Expands-PreCheck-to-Sixty-Additional-Airports/?cid=eltrMtgNews

 

***  Chiggers:

 

My recent family camping trip to the mountains outside Luray, Virginia, was my most recent exposure to chiggers.  I also have unhappy memories of getting chiggers on my legs just above my hiking boots after a hike through the Manassas National Battlefield.  This time I noticed them when I awoke and noticed a rash on my legs and torso.  I was wondering if I had bed bugs in my sleeping bag.  But two weeks later the bites are now subsiding.

 

Trombiculidae are a family of mites which bite their host in their larval stage and cause “intense irritation” or “a wheal, usually with severe itching and dermatitis,” and are called chiggers.

 

You can’t see them, and you don’t know that they’re on you right away.

 

http://www.medicinenet.com/chiggers_bites/article.htm

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trombiculidae

 

***  RANKED: The Best Airlines In America

 

I can’t say I agree with this list of the ten best airlines in America, seemingly based on on-time performance.  I would list them in order of least worst.

 

http://www.sfgate.com/technology/businessinsider/article/RANKED-The-Best-Airlines-In-America-4809018.php

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-best-airlines-in-america-2013-9

 

***  The Top 10 Ways to Sleep on a Plane

 

By Kate Mulcrone

 

(Ned’s comment:  They left off the best one of all.  East a big meal and take a sleeping pill.  You’ll wake up when you smell the coffee somewhere over Ireland.)

 

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/The-Top-10-Ways-to-Sleep-on-a-Plane/?cid=eltrTop10

 

***  10 Perfect Outfits for Long-Haul Flights

 

Ned’s comment:  Sorry guys.  This Fodor’s story is just for girls.  I admit I have some favorite comfy clothes for long trips.  It can get damn cold on those planes, especially if you get the much sought after exit row.  And I also admit that I have a special pair of socks I save for the homeward bound legs…and feet.  One piece of advice: remember that you may need to shed layers to go through security, and you may have to take off your shoes, so pick hole-less-hose on travel days.  One lady ahead of me in the TSA line for a flight had to get down to a slinky tank top which exposed her slinky thong.  She turned to me and said, “I usually get dinner and a movie before I go this far.”

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-perfect-outfits-for-long-haul-flights?ref=news_fd_092113#!1-intro

 

How about you?  Any wardrobe advice for fellow flyers?

Any interesting stories while going through security?

 

Send to Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: September 2013

California’s SMART Pathway

By Laura Stark

 

“They see this project as an enormous opportunity to reinvent themselves as a tourist mecca.”

 

 

When the sunset-hued Golden Gate Bridge first opened more than 75 years ago, it was the engineering marvel of its time. Just north of San Francisco’s famed bridge lies an equally impressive transportation corridor for a new era. When complete, the aptly named SMART Pathway will include the most miles of bike and pedestrian trail alongside active railroad, 52, in the country.

 

Though rail-with-trails are not a new idea—Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC) first reported on them in 1996—they are catching on as a way to create new transportation options in an increasingly constrained urban environment. Today, there are 168 rail-with-trails around the country, a whopping increase of more than 400 percent since RTC’s first report on these projects nearly two decades ago. An updated rail-with-trail report will be published this fall.

 

“We’re building it in the railroad right-of-way and the edge of the trail is pretty close to the tracks,” says Paul Klassen, project manager for the SMART Pathway. “Mostly it’s 10 to 15 feet away, though in some places it’s 100 feet away.”

 

The scope of the project is massive. The Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) commuter rail line and parallel pathway will stretch 70 miles between Cloverdale and Larkspur. This dual transportation system will connect 14 train stations and 10 cities across two counties.

 

“The pathway goes through a lot of historical main street areas,” says John Nemeth, planning manager for the SMART District, which oversees the effort. “It alternates between open space and downtowns, so you can get on and off, and have lunch or go shopping. It’s a town and country experience.”

 

The Marin County Bicycle Coalition has been involved with the pathway since the idea was first conceived in the late 1990s. Its advocacy director, Andy Peri, says the pathway will “create an infinite number of connections. These towns formed along the old rail line. These are population centers with shopping, work places, and schools.”

 

While the area’s rugged hills offer a splendid natural backdrop and a wealth of recreational opportunities—the mountain bike was invented here in the 1970s—they restrict transportation options. “The rail-with-trail project follows Highway 101, which is the only north-south route through Marin County, so it gets quite congested,” says Barry Bergman, manager of trail development at RTC’s Western Office.

 

When traffic backs up, there are no alternative routes for commuters. Originally, only passenger rail service was planned to address the situation, but at the urging of county bicycle coalitions and other advocates, an adjacent pathway was added to the project. “We needed to alleviate congestion through multiple options,” says Carolyn Glendening, SMART’s community education and outreach coordinator. “Working in synergy held more promise than either option alone.”

 

At first, it took some persuading to get everyone on board with the pathway concept, but the project is well underway now. “It had to go through many levels of approval,” says Peri. “Environmental, legislative, funding… and, at every stage, the pathway was in jeopardy. You’re never done until you’re riding the path.”

 

A boost for the effort came in 2008, when a quarter-cent sales tax increase to fund both the rail and the trail was put to voters in Marin and Sonoma counties. A two-thirds supermajority was needed for its passage, and, in the end, nearly 70 percent of voters approved.

 

But the bloom fell off the rose as the recession hit soon after. “The sales tax money dropped off because of the economy,” says Gary Helfrich, executive director for the Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition. “So we had to consider where most people live, and develop that section first. Phase 1 will go from Santa Rosa to San Rafael—county seat to county seat—which are the two largest cities in the North Bay. Phase 2 will be the all the rest.”

 

Of this 38.5-mile stretch, Glendening says, “Phase 1 is fully funded and under construction, starting with the rail portion. The construction contract for some Phase 1 pathway segments will be awarded in the coming months, while other sections are currently under environmental review. Some are even likely to be open and operational before the rail service starts. Beyond Phase 1, the rail and pathway will be completed as funding becomes available.”

 

About five miles of the off-road trail are on the ground already and about a third of the on-road sections are signed and striped. Rail service is expected to begin by late 2015 or early 2016 with trains running every 30 minutes during peak weekday hours. Mid-day and weekend service will also be offered. The train cars will have room for bikes, allowing passengers to combine riding the trail and the train for recreation and commuting.

 

The combination of Sonoma County’s scenic vineyard countryside and Marin County’s craggy terrain may prove irresistible to tourists. “In Marin County, there’s a huge amount of open space,” says Bergman, who regularly hikes in the area with his wife. “There are redwood forests and a beautiful coastline. It’s gorgeous.”

 

The trail’s most unusual feature lies on its southern end: the Cal Park Hill Tunnel, a relic of Northwestern Pacific Railroad, which was active here in the early 1900s when northern California’s towering redwoods were being harvested for lumber. More than 100 years later, the SMART rail line follows that same corridor, converting the tunnel for the modern day by adding a separated trail for bicyclists and pedestrians alongside the trains.

 

RTC provided guidance to Marin County on the project and, inspired by the challenge, published a research report called Tunnels on Trails in 2001. The trail extends a short distance out either side of the 1,100-foot tunnel to connect San Rafael with Larkspur, where trail-goers can catch a ferry to downtown San Francisco.

 

“I was there for the groundbreaking of the tunnel, and this past July I had my first tour of this phenomenal facility,” says Marianne Fowler, RTC’s senior vice present of federal policy. “It’s a key part of the bike/ped infrastructure in Marin County.”

 

A critical piece of funding for the tunnel project was contributed by the Nonmotorized Transportation Pilot Program (NTPP), a federally-funded experiment designed to test the impact of making biking and walking infrastructure a priority of transportation planning. In 2005, Marin County was one of only four communities selected nationwide to receive a $25 million NTPP grant to develop these types of projects and report back on the changes that the investments made in travel habits and other measurable effects.

 

“RTC was instrumental in getting the Pilot Program included in transportation law,” says Fowler. “If Marin County hadn’t received that program grant, the tunnel would probably not have been built as a dual purpose, bike/ped and transit, facility.”

To the north, the SMART Pathway will end at Cloverdale, which, like other small communities along the corridor, stands to gain economically from the people that the SMART system will bring. “Cloverdale is a mill town that’s down on its luck,” says Helfrich. “But their city council really gets it. They see this project as an enormous opportunity to reinvent themselves as a tourist mecca.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Volunteer Opportunities, Rainsong Wildlife Sanctuary, Peninsula Nicoya, Costa Rica

 

WHAT VOLUNTEERS CAN DO: Care for wounded or sick animals, Patrol beaches for turtle nests, Raise and plant tree saplings for reforestation

COSTS: Volunteering: Free!; Accommodations: Free!

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: One-month time commitment, Medical insurance

WEBSITE: www.rainsongsanctuary.com, facebook.com/pages/Rainsong-Wildlife-Sanctuary-Costa-Rica/141821105847000

CONTACT: Mary Lynn Perry (Founder), rainsongwildlifesanctuary@gmail.com, +506 2642 1265

 

http://barefootatlas.com/volunteer/rainsong-wildlife-sanctuary-costa-rica/

 

2.)  Conservation Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., Tiburon, CA

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1837/conservation-intern/job

 

3.)  Volunteering Opportunities, Busch Wildlife Sanctuary at Loxahatchee River District, Jupiter, FL

http://www.buschwildlife.org/volunteer.html

 

4.)  Husky Ranch Adventure, offered through Fronteering Travel Services Inc., Yukon, Canada

 

The Experience

 

Venture to the Northern most territories of Canada for the adventure of a lifetime. Have the opportunity to dog sled and gaze at the amazing northern lights!

 

This ranch needs volunteers all year round and has many great opportunities! This project is a very remote area and your accommodation will be in style without the luxury comforts of the modern world. That means no electricity, but what is there cozier then a crispy and warm fire place? This ranch is extremely popular volunteer abroad project and is great place to experience the bush. Have many opportunities to dogsled during the long winter and of course play with the huskies! This project has excellent opportunities in winter however summer has great long warm days and many opportunities to hike, bike and is a great place for wildlife viewing. The work on the ranch is physically demanding and it is by no means an’ easy holiday option’! The minimum duration of stay is 4 weeks with a maximum duration of 12 weeks. Please consider that you are in a very remote area and this is not the place to be if you are solely interested in pubs and clubs.

 

Why?

 

Play with huskies and go dog sledding!

Live of the grid in a cozy cabin without electricity for the ultimate northern experience!

Volunteer in one of the most beautiful sceneries in the worlds and see the northern lights.

Opportunities for Wildlife viewing in the surrounding the property.

 

Key Start Dates:

 

January, April, July, October (book early in advance to be assured of a volunteer placement)

 

Volunteer duration:  12 weeks

 

Average Work hours:  5,5 days per week starting at 7-8 AM to 6-7 PM (with enough break time in between)

 

Number of Volunteers:  5

 

Volunteer accommodation:  Available

 

Housing Type:  Shared rooms

 

Internet Access:  Yes at the main lodge

 

Who Are They Looking For?

 

Love of the outdoors and a passion for wildlife is a priority. You should not be fussy, picky or hypersensitive about cleaning as this is one of the main chores.  We will not tolerate smoking, alcohol or the use of drugs. Please remember that you are a guest, therefore, respecting the rules is essential.

 

http://www.fronteering.com/trip/husky-adventure

 

5.)  Volunteer opportunity, Keep our parks beautiful, City of Sacramento Volunteer Program, Sacramento, CA

http://www.idealist.org/view/volop/cjgWXbmBJb3p/

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  SPECIAL EVENTS AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR), Arlington County, Arlington, VA

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/arlington/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=721175

***  From Mac’s List:

 

2.)  Vice President Communications and Public Relations, Travel Portland, Portland, OR

 

Travel Portland, an organization dedicated to strengthening the economy by marketing the metropolitan region as a preferred destination for meetings, conventions, and leisure travel, is looking for a proven leader to join our team. The Vice President of Communications and Public Relations leads a dynamic team that targets domestic and international journalists, communicates key messages that reinforce the Portland brand, and secures editorial coverage that supports the organization’s sales efforts and fulfills Travel Portland’s contractual obligations. This position achieves success through the team by providing them with the necessary leadership, resources, and direction. The incumbent carries the full range of management responsibilities.

This is a full-time, benefitted position working 37.5 hours per week from our stunning downtown Portland offices. The successful candidate must have a bachelor’s degree with major course work in communications, public relations or related field, 5 years of management level experience leading a team of public relations/media relations professionals or equivalent combination of experience, education, and training that would provide the skills required for the performance of the essential job duties. This position does involve travel and a valid driver’s license is required.

 

Travel Portland is an EEO/AA/ADA employer committed to diversity.

 

Application Guidelines/Contact:

 

To view the detailed job description for this position, please visit the Travel Portland website at http://www.travelportland.com/about-us/employment-volunteering. The position is open until filled. All interested candidates must apply on line at: jobs@travelportland.com.

 

https://www.macslist.org/macs-list/Travel-Portland/Vice-President-Communications-and-Public-Relations/pY4c1zdJkCdQ/

 

3.)  Media Relations Manager, National Audubon Society, Inc., NY, NY

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1855/media-relations-manager/job

 

4.)  Story and Communications Curator, Marine Mammal Center, Sausalito, California

 

The Marine Mammal Center, an equal opportunity, non-profit employer, is seeking a Story and Communications Curator to join our team. The Marine Mammal Center’s mission is to expand knowledge about marine mammals—their health and that of their ocean environment—and to inspire their global conservation. Our core work is the rescue and rehabilitation of sick and injured marine mammals, supported by state-of-the-art animal care and research facilities, a corps of dedicated volunteers, and an engaged community.

 

The Story and Communications Curator is a full-time, exempt position with competitive benefits. This role requires a strong creative writer and editor who can bring the Center’s work to life through the written word via online and offline marketing channels to help build advocacy and donor support, and to connect with our community. This position is responsible for writing and coordinating email content, related website content and other marketing collateral content. Acting like an internal journalist for The Marine Mammal Center, the Story and Communications Curator has the ability to investigate, write and manage stories (that include scientific details) to appeal to a variety of audiences according to various marketing goals. Creativity, speed and accuracy are a must. This role requires an energetic, organized, creative, and highly detail-oriented individual who is self-motivated, an effective time-manager, and enthusiastic with an innate passion for animal welfar e and environmental conservation. This position reports to the Marketing & Communications Strategy Officer in the Advancement Department.

 

CORE COMPETENCIES

•Excellent grammar, with outstanding written and verbal communication skills

•Demonstrated ability to produce a large volume of story-driven, accurately portrayed written work in a fast-paced environment

•Demonstrated ability to take and edit good quality photographs to accompany content

•Intermediate proficiency with MS Office, specifically Word, PowerPoint, as well as Adobe creative suite, specifically Photoshop and/or AI to edit photographs

•Strong management skills with a team-oriented approach and demonstrated ability to work collaboratively cross-departmentally

•Ability to take direction and work autonomously to meet deadlines

•Creative and flexible out-of-the-box thinker; ability to present new thoughts and ideas regularly

•Good decision-making and problem-solving skills

•Superb time management and multi-tasking skills

•Committed to delivering high quality work with attention to detail

•Meticulous, organized, focused, responsible and trustworthy

•Friendly, self-motivated, proactive, a real go getter and positive

•Must have a positive, can-do attitude

 

MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES Content Creation (50%)

•Conceptualize, research, and write engaging content for online marketing, fundraising and advocacy campaigns, including at least one or two emails and corresponding website content pages per week, and other marketing and PR related projects i.e. writing for blogs and marketing collateral items

•Disseminate all content created each week through to the various marketing and program channels according to the approved weekly plan (i.e. website, social media, (press if relevant), email, third parties etc.)

•Manage the Social Media Manager (a volunteer role) and provide all content to them with clear direction and according to the approved strategy

•Prepare all written and photo content for any partnership/sponsorship campaign

•Work closely with other departments of the Center and through that collaboration, help write and/or edit education, retail and vet sci content for collateral and the website

•Work closely with the Website Specialist to ensure emails and web content is created and uploaded correctly and on time

•Research and propose new content strategy ideas and tests

•Apply established messaging to a variety of marketing tools, taking into account space limitations, branding requirements, target audience and information hierarchy

•Attend weekly “Clinical Rounds” with the veterinary science department to research stories

•Contribute to the development of the content strategy and leads the weekly Content Meetings

•Work closely with the Marketing & Communications Strategy Officer, and Event & Marketing Assistant to research and write online story opportunities to increase visibility on the web i.e. identify relevant like-minded websites and blogs and submit latest news stories and build relationships

 

Editing and Administrating (30%)

•Edit the weekly Communiqué (written by the Executive Director) and Story of the Week (written by the Veterinary Science team)

•Convert science papers into consumer and press friendly 1-2 page synopses which are suitable to be published on the web

•Evaluate and monitor TMMC website content and amends or writes new copy accordingly

•Photograph relevant patients, people, places and products to accompany story, and edit in a photo editing suite

•Upload photographs and written content to an online website (CMS) and email (CRM) system

•Responsible for all media storage and systems, including photography and video

•Ensure compliance with the organization’s policies and procedures, and support the organization’s mission, values, and standards of ethics and integrity. Examples include: abiding by hospital protocol when required to go “behind-the-scenes”; ensuring factual accuracy by fact-checking with relevant departmental experts, receiving approval of story and content from departmental managers; ensuring the organization’s mission is inherent in all content; upload content to the relevant files and systems according to organizational policy

•Attend twice monthly marketing meetings with the Advancement Team to contribute to and update the Advancement Team on project status

 

Public Relations (20%)

•Work closely with the Event & Marketing Assistant to write press releases to support events and campaign launches

•If determined by Marketing & Communications Strategy Officer, serve as PR spokesperson on or offsite as needed

•Manage and work closely with the external PR agency to develop and execute the long-lead PR strategy

 

QUALIFICATIONS

•5+ years of experience writing and proofreading consumer copy in a journalism, marketing and/or nonprofit business capacity

•Degree in Journalism (preferred), English, Marketing, Creative Writing, Advertising, or related field

•Medium to advanced skill level with photographic and video equipment

•Awareness of web content management systems

•Knowledge of nonprofit writing styles and needs preferred

•Knowledge of marine mammals and/or ocean conservation a bonus but not required

•Knowledge of marine science a bonus

•Minimal knowledge of HTML a bonus

•Ability to provide own transport, and be willing to work occasional weekends as Center stories dictate.

 

Application Instructions:

To apply:

 

Please send a cover letter and resume attention Human Resources Director & IT Manager to admin@tmmc.org. Please put “Story and Communications Curator” in the subject line. Please no phone calls or faxed submissions.

 

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=322900012

 

5.)  Tour Guide, Cave of the Mounds, Blue Mounds, WI

 

General Responsibilities

• Welcome tourists and groups who come to Cave of the Mounds NNL

• Conduct safe, enjoyable, and educational tours

•Assist customers in the amazing rock & fossil shop

• Assist customers in the snack bar

• Help to maintain neat, clean and safe buildings and grounds

 

Duties

• Lead interpretive tours of the Cave that are safe, fun, and educational

•Tell the story of the Cave – its formation, growth, discovery, development, and protection – throughout all aspects of time

•Greet the public with a smile and helpful information so they will enjoy their visit to Cave of the Mounds National Natural Landmark

• Assist customers with the sale of merchandise and restock the amazing rock & fossil shop

•Serve customers at the seasonal snack bar in the Visitor Center

•Assist with the processing of merchandise including unpacking, marking, light manufacturing and storing

•Assist with the maintenance of the buildings and grounds through typical tasks and chores such as sweeping, mopping, trash removal, dusting, raking, etc.

 

Qualified Candidates will have:

• Excellent interpersonal communication skills and a friendly manner

•A desire for interaction with the general public and public speaking

• Interest in the natural environment, nature appreciation, nature education

• Good conflict resolution skills and desire to work as a member of a team

• The desire to do a wide variety of tasks in the course of a workday

 

Benefits

• You get to take people through a beautiful Cave!!

•Reciprocity with many, many awesome Wisconsin tourist attractions

•Super cool staff events such as off trail caving, fossil hunts, campfires, and barn movie nights

• Paid training and annual wage review

•The “coolest” summer job EVER!

 

Contact us at  608-437-3038 if interested in employment.

http://www.caveofthemounds.com/employment.htm

 

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

6.)  Bear Tracking – Conservation Biology Volunteers, Ecuador, Andean Bear Foundation, United States

http://bit.ly/1eUa4o1

 

7.)  Development Officer, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Cortez, Colorado

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=26432

 

8.)  Manager, Science Outreach Full-time, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC or Santa Cruz, CA

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/who-we-are/job-listings/manager-science-outreach.html

 

9.)  Manager, Digital Outreach and Fundraising, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/who-we-are/job-listings/manager-digital.html

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for August 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for August 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Climb the mountains and get their good tidings.”

– John Muir

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:

***  20 biggest travel mistakes

***  America’s Dirtiest Hotels

***  America’s most awesome boardwalks

***  QUICK CAMPING TRICKS

***  15 UNESCO Sites to See While You Can

***  A Hiker’s Best Friend

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: August 2013

Tennessee Central Heritage Rail Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  U.S. Forest Service-AMC Alpine Stewardship Volunteer, Franconia Ridge, White Mountains National Forest, New Hampshire

2.)  Volunteer opportunities, MARINE CONSERVATION, O.R.C.A.  (Ocean Research Conservation Africa), Plettenberg Bay, South Africa

3.)  Citizen Science: American Eel Research, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Various locations in New York State

4.)  Volunteer Positions, Devils Tower National Monument, Devils Tower, WY

5.)  Wildlife Intern, Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge, Hollandale , MS

6.)  Public Affairs Intern (local preferred),  Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest, Gainesville, GA

7.)  Sanctuary Ambassador, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, Scituate, MA

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.) Director, Corporate Relations, National Wildlife Federation, Reston, VA

2.)  Volunteer Programs Assistant, The Pacific Crest Trail Association, Sacramento CA

3.)  Executive Director, Wyoming Wilderness Association, Sheridan WY

4.)  Interpretation/Visitor Services Intern, Interpretation/Visitor Services Intern, Charleston , SC

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  20 biggest travel mistakes

By Chuck Thompson, CNN

http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/02/travel/20-travel-mistakes/index.html?hpt=tr_c2

 

***  America’s Dirtiest Hotels

http://www.forbes.com/pictures/eikg45efi/americas-dirtiest-hotels/

 

***  America’s most awesome boardwalks

By Robert Firpo-Cappiello, Budget Travel

http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/23/travel/america-best-boardwalks/index.html?hpt=tr_c1

 

***  QUICK CAMPING TRICKS

 

Want to learn some quick camping tricks? Read our blog post to pick up some tips you can use next time you’re out camping!

 

http://outdoors.campmor.com/14-camping-tips-and-tricks/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=TrailMail-August22013&cm_pla=51688#fbid=OsOFUai_NGF

 

***  15 UNESCO Sites to See While You Can

 

UNESCO’s List of World Heritage in Danger consists of 44 sites that face urgent threats to their integrity as spots of “outstanding universal value,” ranging from environmental degradation to urbanization, overpopulation, and excessive development. These sites are not off-limits to tourists, though. In fact, for some dedicated travelers, there’s no better time to glimpse these historical world wonders before they change—or disappear—forever. Here are 15 of the sites you must see before it’s too late.

 

By Maggie Gorman

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/15-unesco-sites-to-see-while-you-can?ref=news_fd_081713#!1-intro

 

***  A Hiker’s Best Friend

 

Do’s, dont’s, and delights when taking your dog on the trail

 

Story by Lisa Densmore

AMC Outdoors, July/August 2013

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/2013/features/a-hikers-best-friend.cfm

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: August 2013

Tennessee Central Heritage Rail Trail

By Laura Stark

 

“Our identity was coal…Now, our history and our beauty and our tourism will be our focus.”

It’s hard to imagine a prettier place for a rail-trail. The emerging 19-mile Tennessee Central Heritage Rail Trail winds across the high plains of central Tennessee between Cookeville and Monterey, a town “Where the Hilltops Kiss the Sky.” Excitement is building for the new recreational amenity, which will be unique to these communities in a region that already counts itself lucky with gorges, waterfalls, caves, rocky bluffs and the Cumberland Mountains above it all.

 

Named for the Tennessee Central Railroad, a boon for the region in the early twentieth century, the rail-trail offers the enticing potential to spur a new rush of economic opportunity. Its advocates hope that the area’s natural bounty within easy reach of two of the state’s largest cities—Nashville and Knoxville—will make the trail a shoe-in for a tourist destination.

 

“Once the trail opens, it will help the economy greatly around here,” says Ken Hall, Monterey’s cultural administrator. “We lost our identity. Our identity was coal and when that industry died out, the town slowly started to die and we stumbled around looking for an identity. Now, our history and our beauty and our tourism will be our focus.”

 

Hall hopes that when the trail is complete, it will be as well known as the Virginia Creeper. Like its famous cousin, the Tennessee Central Heritage Rail Trail will have no shortage of history for railroad buffs. It’s currently bookended with two trailside depots and, midway, the quaint city of Algood hopes to add a third once its section of trail is complete.

 

“We hope it will help revitalize downtown,” says Keith Morrison, Algood’s City Manager, of the potential new depot. “There used to be a depot here that was a central hub. We want to build a replica and have Algood’s history displayed inside.”

 

On the trail’s western end, the Cookeville depot has stood for more than a century though it had fallen into disrepair after the trains stopped running. It’s hard to imagine now that the beautiful red brick building with its unusual and elegant pagoda-style roof was once scheduled for demolition before a citizens group (later known as the Friends of the Depot) mobilized and restored it.

 

Today, the depot serves as an anchor in Cookeville’s reenergized downtown, surrounded by boutique shops and an eclectic mix of restaurants. Across the street, a large neon sign, nearly dwarfing the building on which it sits, blinks “Cream City Ice Cream,” above an ice cream parlor serving up old-fashioned milkshakes and modern-day lattes.

 

“We don’t have big national brands,” says Melinda Keifer, Cookeville’s economic and community development coordinator. “But we have a strong business community.”

 

The depot in Monterey, on the east end of the trail, opened just last year and has already seen 15,000 visitors. Though it’s a replica, it was thoughtfully recreated from an original diagram of the 1903 building. Ken Hall curates the museum and many of the pieces are his own, handed down from his father who loved the railroad and collected relics from the days of the steam-engine and early diesels.

 

“My grandfather started with the railroad in 1890 and my father in 1934,” says Hall. “All my uncles worked on the railroad, too. Although I didn’t choose the railroad as my career, I wanted that tie to the railroad to complete the circle.”

 

The corridor that the trail follows originally belonged to the Nashville and Knoxville Railroad, founded in 1884, which later became Tennessee Central Railroad. The trains primarily carried coal, as well as other natural resources and manufactured goods. It had a long run, lasting until 1968 before finally going out of business. But the tracks did not stay dormant permanently. Nearly 20 years later, a few trains a week began to roll down the corridor once again under a new banner, the Nashville and Eastern Railroad, which now serves a large sand mining operation and other industries between Nashville and Monterey.

 

A few times a year, vintage 1950s-era trains also whisk bright-eyed tourists from Nashville to Cookeville and other communities along the way to enjoy farmers markets, antique shops, handmade crafts, friendly restaurants, and all the warmth and charm of small Southern towns. The themed rides, organized by the Tennessee Central Railway Museum, include fall foliage sightseeing, journeys with Santa, and Thomas the Train trips that proclaim to give youngsters the “ride of their life.”

 

“The excursion trains carry 300 to 500 people from Nashville to enjoy our town,” says Keifer. As the home of Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville is a college town that she calls, “a happening little place.”

 

The much anticipated pathway will be built on the outer edge of the active railroad’s right-of-way. Such projects, known as rail-with-trails, are not uncommon around the country and offer effective ways of connecting communities. Rails-to-Trails Conservancy is developing a report—anticipated to be published within the next few weeks—to provide tools and information on rail-with-trails like this one for the trail-building community.

 

“The railroad has been wonderful to work with,” says Keifer. “They’ve been ready to compromise and work with us in any way that they can.”

 

Currently, only a half-mile of the Tennessee Central Heritage Rail Trail has been constructed, but more trail is coming, and soon. A partnership of four government agencies—Putnam County, Cookeville, Algood and Monterey—is actively pursuing its development, and a nonprofit volunteer group will manage and maintain the trail.

 

The remainder of the trail will be built in four phases, starting in Cookeville and moving east. Funding is in place for the first phase, a four-mile stretch from Cookeville to Algood, and bidding is expected to get underway within the next few months. Construction may begin as early as next spring. The second phase of nearly seven miles is expected to follow hot on its heels.

 

East of Algood, passage up the side of Brotherton Mountain for phase three will prove a challenge, but also an appealing attraction for adventure seekers. The trail diverts from the rail corridor here with switchbacks used to manage the elevation.

 

“I think the section that will draw the most tourists will be the rustic section between Monterey and Algood,” says Hall. “It will be a beautiful trail with mountain scenery, woodlands and lots of wildlife.”

 

The last phase, about a mile long, will connect the trail to the already open segment in Monterey. The town is awaiting word on a potential grant for construction and, once in hand, can begin the bidding process. Hall thinks the section could be completed as early as the end of the year.

 

After many years of slow, but steady progress, this flurry of activity makes the trail more tantalizingly palpable than ever. “There was a tremendous amount of excitement when the project was originally thrown out there,” says Keifer of the trail, which was first proposed in the mid-2000s. “Once we get our next piece on the ground, it will re-energize that momentum.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  U.S. Forest Service-AMC Alpine Stewardship Volunteer, Franconia Ridge, White Mountains National Forest, New Hampshire

 

Help Protect Alpine Vegetation on Franconia Ridge

 

The U.S. Forest Service-AMC Alpine Stewardship Volunteer program started in 2000, sparked by the dedicated interest of a few individuals. Since its inception, the program has grown to include 12 dedicated Alpine Stewards who patrol Franconia Ridge each weekend from Mid-May through Columbus Day.

 

Through this program, the AMC and the USFS hope to increase the public’s awareness of its impact on the alpine environment and educate ridge visitors about preservation of alpine vegetation. These volunteer Stewards address topics such as the importance of staying within the treadway, prevention of “summit sprawl,” Leave No Trace ethics, ridge safety and low-impact trail tending. While on the trail, they are available to respond to questions or concerns of ridge hikers and can engage visitors in a friendly, educational manner.

 

Who Should Apply

 

The individuals who will most enjoy serving as alpine stewards are those who:

•Have a friendly, outgoing, professional manner, in addition to experience working with the general public in a recreational setting.

•Are an avid hiker with an understanding of the White Mountain National Forest and AMC.

•Are comfortable approaching individuals to provide conservation and safety information.

•Are AMC members.

•Have a current Wilderness First Aid and CPR certification.

•Are committed to the protection of the alpine zone and the promotion of Leave No Trace ethics.

•Are able to provide coverage at least two weekends per year.

•Are able to attend the annual training and meeting, usually held in the spring.

 

What They Do

 

Stewards take on a number of rewarding responsibilities, including:

•Demonstrating and exemplifying appropriate alpine zone behavior and Leave No Trace ethics.

•Approaching hikers to provide education on the alpine zone environment, ecology, Leave No Trace practices and low-impact trail tending.

•Approaching visitors causing a negative impact on the alpine zone to provide education in a friendly, educational manner.

•Providing information to visitors about safety concerns, particularly regarding weather.

•Communicating information concerning Forest Service backcountry camping regulations and Leave No Trace principles, as needed or requested.

•Participating in the AMC Mountain Watch Program’s ozone and visibility study.

 

How the AMC and USFS Support Them

 

The AMC and USFS provide the following for alpine stewards:

•Room and board on the weekends they serve.

•Gear and uniform to use while working.

•Annual training opportunities.

•Recognition for their efforts through Stewardship Society awards, based on the number of hours contributed annually.

 

How to Apply

The Alpine Stewardship Volunteer Program is a small program, being located solely on Franconia Ridge in New Hampshire. We are always interested in receiving applications in the event of an opening, however. For more information, email us by selecting “Volunteers” from this form. Please be sure to include a brief description of why you are interested in the program. You will receive a brochure and an application in the mail.

 

http://www.outdoors.org/volunteers/information/information-alpine.cfm

 

2.)  Volunteer opportunities, MARINE CONSERVATION, O.R.C.A.  (Ocean Research Conservation Africa), Plettenberg Bay, South Africa

 

The Ultimate Whale & Dolphin Experience

 

The O.R.C.A. Marine Foundation is located in Plettenberg Bay on the world famous Garden Route of South Africa. “Plett” (as it’s lovingly referred to by locals) is home to some of the world’s most fascinating marine species and one of the best places in South Africa to view them.  This includes Southern Right Whales, Humpback Whales, Bryde’s Whales, Bottlenose Dolphins, Humpback Dolphins, Common Dolphins, Orca or Killer Whales, and Great White Sharks. A volunteer placement at O.R.C.A. gives a unique, once in life time opportunity to observe these magnificent marine species while participating in exciting marine conservation, community-based and educational volunteer work.

 

Volunteers enjoy trips to sea (in boats and sea kayaks) to view many magnificent animals. The town of Plettenberg Bay, which is dependent on eco-tourism, has benefited significantly from the O.R.C.A.’s programs through community upliftment, information gathered from O.R.C.A. researchers on various aspects of the Bay, and promotion of marine eco-tourism.

 

Recently O.R.C.A. was honoured as the Runner-up for the Indaba/Fair Trade “Excellence in Environmental Stewarship” award.  O.R.C.A.’s mission is to facilitate the implementation of a ‘Best Practise’ model for the management of the Bay and to change community consciousness relating to environmental issues to achieve intelligent co-existence in Plettenberg Bay.

 

O.R.C.A. (Ocean Research Conservation Africa) works in partnership with both the Centre for Dolphin Studies and Ocean Blue Adventures.  If you are passionate about the conservation and sustainability of marine coastal systems, then O.R.C.A. is the ideal project for you.

 

Volunteer Work

 

During your stay in Plettenberg Bay (one of the most breathtaking and serene outdoor classrooms in Southern Africa), you will be lucky enough to witness the power and grace of whales, the exuberance of dolphins, the playfulness of seals, and the majestic beauty of mountain, forest and coastal ecosystems. Above all, being an O.R.C.A. volunteer will allow you to actively participate in conserving our marine life for future generations. Through our O.R.C.A. marine conservation projects, you will help the team manage this marine and coastal zone in a sustainable manner and in the process experience the community, culture and environment in a more intimate way than most visitors.

 

The experienced O.R.C.A. team will help settle you into the program and provide ongoing guidance and mentorship during your stay. You will have the opportunity to take on individual projects, if desired, or integrate with the team.  From assisting the research teams to helping with the community outreach programme, you will find your own way to contribute.

 

All volunteer activities support the conservation and social objectives of the O.R.C.A Marine Foundation. Volunteers will get involved with many of the following (as many activities are weather or seasonally dependent):

 

• Participating in community development and education programmes in local disadvantaged communities (e.g. Qolweni Pre-School).

 

• Organizing and presenting at provincial/national marine and coastal awareness campaigns (such as National Environment Week, National Marine Week, and Youth Day) when they occur.

 

• Experiencing and assisting in amazing marine eco-tourism with Ocean Blue Adventures (whale and dolphin watching).

 

• Monitoring and cleaning campaigns on beaches and coastal regions.

 

• Maintaining, cleaning and collecting food for O.R.C.A.’s aquarium species, which are used for education and conservation purposes.

 

• Sampling, tagging, and monitoring of local fish species.

 

• Fin profiling and spatial distribution programs.

 

• Assisting with O.R.C.A.’s carbon reduction program and removal of alien plant species.

 

• Enjoying educational presentations on conservation and ecological topics.

 

Volunteer placements are always changing and varied, and particularly dependent on weather conditions.  Bad weather may delay conservation/research activities and result in some indoor activities and courses.  Of course, we do our best to get the boats into the ocean as much as possible, although safety comes first.

 

Marine Guiding Course

 

Volunteers staying for 4 weeks or longer have the opportunity to partake in the Marine Guiding Course to qualify as a local marine guide as well as  the Competent Crew Course where volunteers learn basic boat skills, radio work, safety at sea etc.

 

Marine Strandings Course

 

All interested volunteers can participate in the marine strandings course. This is an introduction to first aid for marine animals who strand on our beaches.

 

Other Activities

 

The atmosphere is one of ‘mixing it with the locals’ and O.R.C.A. volunteers are welcomed into local programs and enjoy all kinds of fun extra activities. Rental cars and taxis are available to hire for after hours and weekend activities.

 

Leisure activities in Plett include horseback riding, golf, angling, sailing, scuba diving and surfing, as well as hiking and bird-watching in nearby Robberg, Keurbooms River and Tsitsikamma Nature Reserves. Other highly recommended activities include treetop canopy tours or bungee jumps off the 216m Bloukrans River Bridge (the highest bridge jump in the world)!

 

Field Conditions

 

Plettenberg Bay is a beach-lover’s paradise.  Plett is characterised by sweeping, unspoilt golden beaches, a dramatic rocky peninsula, intriguing estuaries, towering indigenous forests and breathtaking rivers and sea. With its exceptional climate and beautiful viewsover the Indian Ocean, Plettenberg Bay is an idyllic location for a volunteer holiday.

 

The O.R.C.A. volunteer house is very cute.  It is located near the beach, within close proximity to a shopping centre with shops, cinemas, restaurants and bars, and approximately one mile from the O.R.C.A. office in Plettenberg Bay.

 

The house is self-catering, with shared bedroom and bathroom facilities. Basic food for meals is provided at the house. Evening meals are prepared for volunteers six nights per week, though volunteers are also welcome to eat out.  Volunteers may need to pack a lunch for certain activities, but will be informed of this ahead of time when such situations arise.

 

Laundry facilities are available for volunteers, and Teliswa does communal washing weekly.

 

A communal telephone line is available at the volunteer house. The phone can receive incoming calls and make outgoing calls on a world calling card (available at nearby shops). There is ADSL access to the internet at the volunteer house. Skype  is available to those who have access as well as satellite television.

 

Training / Qualifications

 

The program is limited to 12 volunteers to provide a more intimate and personal experience.  Training will be given in various aspects of marine conservation.  No experience is necessary to join.

 

Age Requirement

 

O.R.C.A. accepts volunteers of 16+ years of age.  Volunteers under 16 years old are only considered when accompanied by a parent/guardian.  There isn’t a maximum age limit, though a reasonable fitness level is necessary.

 

Costs

 

Volunteer Contribution:

 

1 week: GB£595 / US$995

 

2 weeks: GB£895 / US$1495

 

3 weeks: GB£1195 / US$1995

 

4 weeks: GB£1495 / US$2495

 

Extra weeks: GB£295 / US$495 per week

 

Please Note:

 

Volunteers receive a $100 discount when joining multiple Enkosini programs.

 

Enkosini uses USD rates as standard due to currency fluctuations. GBP rates are indications of approx recent values. Currency convertor at www.xe.com.

 

Volunteer contributions cover meals, accommodation, activities, transfers from Plettenberg Bay to O.R.C.A., and project donation. Flights and travel/medical insurance are NOT included. The only additional spending money required will be for personal purchases, social excursions away from O.R.C.A., and pre/post project travel.  We do not have discounted rates for partial weeks.

 

Please bear in mind that the sooner you apply, the better your chances of securing your placement!

 

Dates

 

The O.R.C.A. program doesn’t have set dates, though we do try to coordinate arrivals/departures on Sundays whenever possible so that volunteers begin the program together on Mondays.

 

http://www.enkosini.org/ORCAWhale&DolphinResearch.htm

 

3.)  Citizen Science: American Eel Research, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Various locations in New York State

 

The American eel (Anguilla rostrata) is a migratory fish that is born in the Atlantic Ocean and enters North American tributaries as tiny “glass eels”. The species is in decline over much of its range, and baseline studies of migrations are crucial for management.

 

Teams of scientists, students, and community volunteers collect glass eels using net and trap devices on several Hudson River tributaries each spring. The juvenile fish are counted, weighed, and released alive, and other environmental data is recorded. At several sites, herring surveys are also conducted.

 

The project involves students and teachers directly with scientific design and field methods. Students experience their local ecosystem firsthand, and collect important information about migrating fish and environmental conditions over an entire season.

•Check out results from 2013 in the Hudson River American Eel Research Project Overview (PDF, 1.89 mB)

•Download the Hudson River Eel Project Report (PDF) (1.34 mB), which covers results from 2008-2013

 

Information for Volunteers

 

Project Description: Volunteers will check nets one or more days per week. It takes approximately 45 minutes to sample each day. All gear and materials are provided, but personal transportation to the site is required. You should be willing to work outside under variable conditions, wear waders into the stream, and work collaboratively within a team of students and volunteers. The project is fun and provides important data on eel migration.

•Download our Volunteer Flyer (PDF, 255 kB)

 

Contact:

Zoraida Maloney: ztmalone@gw.dec.state.ny.us;  (845) 889-4745  x.107

Chris Bowser: chbowser@gw.dec.state.ny.us

 

Sample streams include:

 

High school students collect eels on a local stream

Poughkeepsie High School students collect

glass eels on the Fall Kill

•Richmond Creek in Staten Island

•Bronx River in the Bronx

•Saw Mill in Yonkers

•Furnace Brook in Cortlandt

•Minisceongo Creek in West Haverstraw

•Indian Brook at Constitution Marsh in Cold Spring

•Quassaick Creek in Newburgh

•Fall Kill in Poughkeepsie

•Crum Elbow Creek in Hyde Park

•Black Creek in Esopus

•Saw Kill in Annandale-on-Hudson

•Hannacroix Creek in New Baltimore

 

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/49580.html

 

4.)  Volunteer Positions, Devils Tower National Monument, Devils Tower, WY

 

Devils Tower National Monument has a very active volunteer program. Our VIPs (Volunteers-in-the-Parks) help support the Monument in a variety of ways. There are five basic positions that are recruited for at the Monument:

1.Visitor Center Assistant – provides information and orientation to park visitors; assists with junior ranger programs; roves hiking trails and prairie dog town

2.Climbing – provides information to climbers; assists with climbing patrols

3.Maintenance – performs a variety of maintenance tasks such as trash collection, construction or repair of trails, cleaning, small projects, etc.

4.Adminstrative Clerk – Answers phones, assists with filing, inputing of data, etc.

5.Campground Host – provides information and assistance to visitors camping in monument; roves campground

 

http://www.nps.gov/deto/supportyourpark/volunteer.htm

 

5.)  Wildlife Intern, Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge, Hollandale , MS

http://www.thesca.org/wildlife-intern/po-00188061

 

6.)  Public Affairs Intern (local preferred),  Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest, Gainesville, GA

 

This position would work from the Forest Supervisor’s Office located in Gainesville, Georgia. The Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests provide the finest outdoor recreation opportunities and natural resources in Georgia. Featuring nearly 867,000 acres across 26 counties, hundreds of miles of clear-running streams and rivers, approximately 850 miles of recreation trails, and dozens of campgrounds, picnic areas, and other recreation activity opportunities, these lands are rich in natural scenery, history and culture. The mission of the USDA Forest Service is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the nation’s forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. The Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests is part of the Southern Region, with the Forest Supervisor’s office managing four District units in Blairsville (Blue Ridge District), Lakemont (Chattooga River District), Chatsworth (Conasauga District), and Eatonton (Oconee District).

 

The Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests public affairs intern is expected to have a high level of experience with social media, and be able to think strategically and see how social media fits into a marketing strategy. The intern must be able to assist in formulating social media plans and then carry them out with direction of the Public Affairs team. S/he must be able to measure and document the impact of social media, and then suggest action-steps to increase impact.Specific tasks include:

•Researches, understands and follows Forest Service social media policies and guidelines

•Monitors USDA and Forest Service social media accounts (Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, Facebook, blog, etc.)

•Helps to tell our story by developing strategic marketing plans, including characteristics and needs of the target audiences, communication techniques most appropriate, and recommended approaches

•Works with the Public Affairs team to write and post feature articles, blogs, tweets, etc.

•Tracks growth and impact of social media efforts

•Shoots and edits videos to USDA standards, uploads videos

•Photographs sites and events on the forest, edits photos, catalogues and tags photos, creates metadata, uploads photos

•Contributes content for forest website including photos, videos and written articles

•Explores new ways to connect with young audiences

•Reaches out to diverse, minority and urban audiences

•Seeks out opportunities to partner in existing programs and projects, leveraging Forest Service resources

 

Skills and attributes interns are expected to have:

•Excellent written communication skills

•Creative!

•Interest in the outdoors, the national forest and conservation issues

•Extensive knowledge of social media –Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, blogs, etc.

•Ability to develop a marketing plan using a standard process and template as provided

•Knowledge of digital media software – Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Lightroom are pluses

•Knowledge of video editing software – Premiere Elements is a plus

•Willingness to create blogs, write press releases, create videos, and post tweets daily

•Energy, with a desire to come up with fresh ideas

•Ability to identify a target market and “speak” to that audience through social media

•Experience proofreading and editing

•Willingness to explore sites on the forest, taking photos, shooting video, talking to visitors, participating in conservation work

 

There is potential for this position to be extended beyond 12 weeks. This position is not eligible for an AmeriCorps Education Award.

 

http://www.thesca.org/public-affairs-intern-local-preferred/po-00345364

 

7.)  Sanctuary Ambassador, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, Scituate, MA

 

Volunteer with Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary and significantly contribute to our ongoing education and conservation efforts. In return, you can explore interests, develop marketable skills, enrich your own education, discover new talents, have fun, and make a difference.

 

•Complete a volunteer application (PDF file, 32KB). Fax or mail the completed, signed form to:

Anne-Marie Runfola, Volunteer Coordinator

Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary

175 Edward Foster Rd.

Scituate, MA 02066

781-545-8036 (f)

Contact Anne-Marie with questions and ideas: anne-marie.runfola@noaa.gov, or 781-545-8026

http://stellwagen.noaa.gov/involved/vol_open.html

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.) Director, Corporate Relations, National Wildlife Federation, Reston, VA

http://ch.tbe.taleo.net/CH18/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=NWF&cws=1&rid=553

 

2.)  Volunteer Programs Assistant, The Pacific Crest Trail Association, Sacramento CA

 

Work passionately on behalf of the finest hiking and equestrian trail. Our work place matches the quality of trail that we steward. Join us.

 

The Pacific Crest Trail Association, headquartered in Sacramento, California is dedicated to protecting, preserving and promoting the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. The following staff position is currently open:

 

Volunteer Programs Assistant

 

In this position you will have the opportunity to:

 

Recruit and support trail crew volunteers

 

Maintain website updates for volunteer projects to ensure content is fresh, current, and concise

 

Demonstrate continuous effort to improve operations, streamline work processes, and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality seamless customer service to volunteers

 

Work to develop new volunteer opportunities and assist in filling these positions

 

Ensure that volunteers are continually recognized and rewarded for their work

 

The Volunteer Programs Assistant is a key full-time staff position working in the Sacramento office. Salary is dependent on qualifications. Benefits include health insurance, a contribution to a 401k plan, 11 paid holidays, paid vacation and paid sick leave.

 

We are seeking applicants with:

 

A bachelor’s degree

 

Minimum of three years of relevant professional experience that involves work with volunteers and work with nonprofit organizations

 

Ability to work independently to bring a project to completion and skills in facilitating partnerships, developing collaborative projects, prioritizing and managing multiple tasks

 

Excellent organizational, analytical, writing and oral presentation skills

 

Excellent interpersonal and relationship-building skills

 

Ability to interact well with a wide range of people of all levels within and outside the organization

 

Strong research and information gathering skills

 

Strong computer literacy; database experience

 

Able to work independently and as part of a team

 

Positive, flexible, creative attitude and a sense of humor

 

Ability and willingness to travel on the PCT

 

Ability and willingness to travel and work a variable schedule including weekends

 

Trail crew volunteer opportunities experience

 

Familiarity and interest in environmental issues, trails, and backcountry recreation

 

Submit application by August 29th. Please e-mail resume, letter of interest detailing applicable qualifications, list of three references, and salary history to hr@pcta.org with the subject Volunteer Programs Assistant. Review the documents below for more information.

http://www.ecojobs.com/jobs_details.php?sec=3EW&AID=86007

 

3.)  Executive Director, Wyoming Wilderness Association, Sheridan WY

http://www.ecojobs.com/jobs_details.php?sec=1EW&AID=85951

 

4.)  Interpretation/Visitor Services Intern, Interpretation/Visitor Services Intern, Charleston , SC

http://www.thesca.org/interpretationvisitor-services-intern/po-00378741

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
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Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
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Your Very Next Step newsletter for July 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for July 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Man is so made that he can only find relaxation from one kind of labor by taking up another.”

― Anatole France

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

***  This edition of Your Very Next Step comes to you from Auburndale, Massachusetts

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 591 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Hiking with Dogs

***  The Top 10 Places to Eat Ice Cream

***  The road less traveled

***  In Wildness Benefit concert

***  I love this idea:  Rent-a-Backcountry-Canoe

***  Festivals we missed for 2013:  FinnFest

 

***  Track any 787 flight

***  Get miles for your pet

***  It’s Hot Out There… Enjoy the Water Safely and Responsibly

***  HAMMOCK CAMPING 101

***  Appalachian Trail Hikers Are Going Digital

***  10 Most Wi-Fi Connected US Airports and 10 Least-Connected

***  Rare Black Jellyfish Seen at San Diego Beaches

***  Palau’s Jellyfish Lake

***  Stranger things have happened in hotels

***  8 Far-Flung Walking Sojourns

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: July 2013

Illinois’ Rock Island Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  SEASONAL PARK ATTENDANT at Button Bay State Park, Vermont State Parks, Ferrisburgh, Vermont

2.)  Russian Olive Removal and Chipping Along the Poudre River Corridor, CSFS Volunteer Program, Fort Collins, Colo.

3.)  Wisconsin Frog and Toad Survey, Wisconsin DNR, madison, WI (Survey locations throughout the state)

4.)  Visitor center volunteer, Wisconsin State Park System, Various locations in Wisconsin

5.)  Tillamook State Forest, Oregon Department of Forestry, Tillamook, OR

6.)  Forest watch volunteers, Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Various locations

7.)  Pacific Northwest Trail Volunteer Trail Crew, Pacific Northwest Trail Association, Sedro-Woolley, WA

8.)  CRANE INTERNSHIP, Audubon Species Survival Center (SSC), Audubon Nature Institute, New Orleans, LA

9.)  Insect Keeper Intern, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO

 

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Communications Manager, California Native Plant Society, Sacramento, California

2.)  Avian Field Assistants: migrant use of hardwood habitats, Old Dominion University, Virginia / Maryland

3.)  Executive Director, Seattle Audubon Society, Seattle, Washington

4.)  Outreach Specialist, Center for EcoTechnology, Northampton, Massachusetts

5.)  Park Ranger Assistant, Sacramento County, Sacramento, CA

6.)  Park Ranger, Lifeguards, booth and Grounds Maintenance, Saginaw County Parks, Saginaw, MI

7.)  PARK RANGER II (RESTRICTED), Hillsborough County, Tampa, FL

8.)  Full Time Ranger, The Wildlands Conservancy, Wind Wolves Preserve, California

9.)  Outdoor School – Instructor, REI, Fairfax, VA

10.)  Park Ranger, City of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

11.)  Marketing and Communications Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., New York, NY

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  The road less traveled:

 

Dear Ned,

 

I was so captivated by your storytelling that my very next step – which should have been working on a rather pedestrian assignment – detoured to places I’ve never been. Thanks for sharing your adventures and authentic observations from UAE, India, Singapore and parts beyond. I don’t always travel vicariously, but when I do, I choose YVNS.

 

Carry on! (your luggage and your fine travel narratives)

 

With appreciation from Texas,

 

Susan

 

Susan H. Burnell, APR

 

***  Cape Cod:

 

We had a very brief “vacation” at the family house in Harwich, Mass.    It’s been in the family since 1937.  This time the house had a “for sale” sign on the front lawn.  I spent time cleaning the attic and garage, doing some yard work and taking five loads to the town landfill.  But we still made time to go out to a couple of our favorite dinig establishments, Ruggis’s for breakfast;Bonatt’s for melt-a-ways, of course; Buca’s Tuscan Roadhouse; and The Port for dinner; and Sir Cricket’s for seafood.  We made the obligatory visit to the Bird Watchers General Store, where both Tom and I told jokes and we each got a pencil.  We also saw our picture on the wall, winners in the t-short contest, taken in the Gros Ventre wilderness during ArrowCorps 2008 (http://birdwatchersgeneralstore.com/Contest2012.htm).

 

Barbara and I were going fishing, so we bought a flounder rig and some sea worms at Goose Hummock shop.  In fact, we caught a fish on the first day on the Wychemere Jarbor jetty.  On the second morning Tom came with us.  In trying to free the hook in some seaweek he slid on the rocks, which put an end to fishing.  He’s fine, but it was painful.

 

We went to a Harwich Mariners game against the Orleans Redbirds.  The Mariners were behind when we left (we waited until the 50-50 winners were announced, and we won a ten dollar gift certificate to Ruggi’s) because we wanted to get to Sundae School before they closed (http://www.sundaeschool.com/Locations.aspx).  We thought we saw lightening on the way home.  Tom checked huis smart phone which informed us there was zero percent chance of parcipitation.  It was coming down in torrent when we got home.

 

We got our residents beach parking sticker for the last time, and enjoyed walks on Bank Street beach and at Sand Pond and Seymours Pond.

 

We sepent a few days in Aubuirndale at my mother’s house before Laura and the kids returned to Washington and I stayed behind to help out for a week or so.

 

The Cape house has been sold. But I can always hear the twang of the rusty spring and the slam of the screen door.  In fact, I can hear it right now, and I can imagine myself walking out onto the soft grass in my bare feet.

 

***  In Wildness Benefit concert

 

September 22nd, 2013 we will be celebrating our trails and rivers with a fundraising concert to be held at the Seattle Mountaineers Program Center. The In Wildness Benefit concert will help to create regional visibility and lend support to the PNTA, the Wild Rivers Foundation and the Seattle Philharmonic Orchestra.

http://www.pnt.org/inwildness.html

 

***  Hiking with Dogs on travels fur and near…

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/web/hiking-with-dogs.cfm

 

***  The Top 10 Places to Eat Ice Cream

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/The-Top-10-Places-to-Eat-Ice-Cream/

 

***  I love this idea:  Rent-a-Backcountry-Canoe

 

…Canoes are available at quite a few of the back country pond sites.  $1/hour on the honor system in the back country though some sites closer to the road need a key you pick up when you check in…

 

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/trip-reports/topics/146513.html

 

***  Festivals we missed for 2013:  FinnFest

 

On Midsummer’s Eve 1865, some thirty Finns and Sámi landed on the shores of the Portage Canal in Hancock, Michigan, and began work in the copper mines the next day. Though much has changed since then, we have maintained many of the traditions these people brought with them, forming our own unique Finnish American culture that reflects our roots and our continued ties to Finns worldwide.

 

Hancock remains a pivotal center of Finnish American culture.So join us at Midsummer — our legendary winter snows will have melted away, revealing stunning surroundings to immerse yourself in. We are ready to provide you with an unforgettable FinnFest experience, done in true Copper Country style — copper over gold, sauna over spa and pasty over pâté. We’ll have our coffee brewing, our saunas warming, and our communities ready to welcome both new and longtime friends.

 

http://www.finnfestusa2013.org/

 

***  This is cool:

 

I’ve flown a lot of different aircraft, including the new 787-8, A-380 and 787.

 

There aren’t so many of them in the world…so you can use this Google Earth application to see where every inflight 787 is at the moment, from multiple points of view.

 

This is a cool app that lets you track any 787 flight:

 

http://www.newairplane.com/787/dreamliner-live/

 

Frequent felines?

 

Dogs and cats that travel on a Virgin Australia domestic flight can now collect points for their owners that can then be used to obtain discounts on future flights.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/10157175/Pet-miles-reward-frequent-fliers.html

 

***  It’s Hot Out There… Enjoy the Water Safely and Responsibly

http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/outdoor-report/2013/07/10/#intro

 

***  HAMMOCK CAMPING 101

 

Learn the basics of hammock camping and experience a different way to sleep and relax on your next camping trip!

http://outdoors.campmor.com/hammock-camping-101/#fbid=OsOFUai_NGF

 

***  From Bernie Wagenblast’s TCN Newsletter:

 

Appalachian Trail Hikers Are Going Digital

Link to article in The Star-Ledger:

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2013/07/appalachian_trail_goes_digital.html

 

10 Most Wi-Fi Connected US Airports and 10 Least-Connected

Link to article on Skift:

http://skift.com/2013/07/18/10-most-wi-fi-connected-u-s-airports-and-10-least-connected/

 

(I think this is misleading.  It shows which airports have the most connections with a paid service.  For me, I conne3ct for free, or not at all.)

 

 

***  Rare Black Jellyfish Seen at San Diego Beaches

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/52492141/ns/local_news-san_diego_ca/t/rare-black-jellyfish-seen-san-diego-beaches/

 

***  Palau’s Jellyfish Lake

http://travel.ninemsn.com.au/glance/329443/jellyfish-lake-draws-a-crowd.glance

 

***  Stranger things have happened in hotels

 

Would you share a hotel room with a stranger to get money off your bill?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/10182183/Sleep-with-a-stranger-for-a-half-price-room.html

 

***  8 Far-Flung Walking Sojourns

 

by  Larry O’Hanlon

http://news.discovery.com/adventure/travel/walking-sojourns-130701.htm

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: July 2013

Illinois’ Rock Island Trail

By Laura Stark

 

“The trail has become part of the fabric of their lives.”

 

Midway between Chicago and St. Louis, lies a rail-trail of such character and beauty that it inspired a lifetime of trail advocacy in not just one, but two recipients of our highest honor, the Doppelt Family Rail-Trail Champion Award. One of these champions, former U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood grew up in Peoria, which anchors the southern end of the Rock Island Trail that winds through central Illinois.

 

“He’s been a direct friend of the trails in Illinois and the Rock Island Trail—no doubt about it,” says George Bellovics with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR), which manages most of trail. “His legacy is well known and appreciated by people in the area.”

 

The other is George M. Burrier, Jr., who heads the Friends of the Rock Island Trail group and has been involved in the trail’s development for more than 30 years.

 

Such devotion to the trail is not unusual. “We get a lot of local users,” says Bellovics. “The trail has become part of the fabric of their lives.”

 

IDNR’s portion of the trail, which stretches 26 miles from Toulon to Alta (just north of Peoria), has a distinct country feeling: rolling farmlands, splashes of wildflowers, and leafy canopies offering a cool respite in the warm summers. A railroad relic, the Spoon River trestle bridge, offers postcard-perfect views. “The trail is a slice of Midwestern Americana,” says Bellovics.

 

Just a few months ago, the nonprofit organization Trails for Illinois released a report, Making Trails Count in Illinois, which shared the results of a 13-week usage study on six trails throughout the state, including the Rock Island Trail. The study, done in partnership with Rails-to-Trails Conservancy, showed that the trail’s average estimated annual use ranged from 3,380 on its rural northern end to 36,535 on its urban southern side.

 

“Those figures may seem small compared to trails in larger metro areas,” says Steve Buchtel, Trails for Illinois’ executive director, “But for small communities outside Peoria, like Toulon with a population of less than 2,000, they’re connected to a trail that sees thousands of people. That’s quite an economic opportunity.”

 

The small country towns that the trail goes through—Toulon, Wyoming, Princeville, Dunlap, and Alta—are known for their hospitality. Eric Oberg, trail development manager for RTC’s Midwest Regional Office, recalls seeing a “Trail Users Welcome” sign outside a bar and grill right off the trail in Toulon with staff that “couldn’t be more accommodating or nice.”

 

And the trail is proving to be of value to residential developers, too. “Tons of residences are going up along the trail,” says Michael Friberg, a project manager for the Peoria Park District. “They all have put in connections to the Rock Island Trail, which speaks highly of it being a benefit.”

 

Buchtel hopes the report will help build the case for the economic value of trails. “The old mindset was: ‘Trails just don’t bring business,'” he says. “It’s exciting to have data that shows otherwise and profoundly. We found that a third of survey respondents made a purchase while using the trail.”

 

Oberg also points out that, “The trail counts showed the untapped potential of the trail. The counts could be even higher, but there’s a lack of awareness. The trail is a wonderful amenity that’s underused.”

 

This lack of awareness is an issue that Buchtel agrees with and he hopes in the future that the state will promote more trail-based tourism.

 

“When I speak to groups, there will be 150 people in the room,” says Buchtel. “I’ll ask, ‘Who’s been on the Rock Island Trail?’ and almost no one raises a hand. But if I ask who’s been on the Elroy-Sparta, hands in the whole room go up. We have trails that can go toe-to-toe with theirs, but Wisconsin invites people to come.”

 

At the time that the Elroy-Sparta State Trail opened in 1967, the history of the Rock Island Trail was just beginning. The trail’s corridor was donated to IDNR in 1969 by a nonprofit group, the Forest Park Foundation, who had acquired it from the Peoria and Rock Island Railroad a few years earlier. In 1973, the land became a state park, but the idea soon arose to develop a rail-trail through it to increase its accessibility and value. Resistance from adjacent landowners who instead wanted to claim the property for their own was swift and furious. When trail work began between Toulon and Wyoming, trail champion Burrier helped to restore a bridge set on fire by opponents.

 

Progress continued, but sometimes covertly. In 1986, the Friends of the Rock Island Trail secretly purchased the last remaining depot on the line. Today, Wyoming Station serves as a visitor center and railroad museum.

 

“We bought it from one of our supporters and I did the legal work,” says Burrier, a former attorney. “We spent a few years restoring the depot, then gave it to the IDNR. Now, those same people that opposed the trail are volunteering in the depot.”

 

All 26 miles opened in 1989 and the rail-trail was officially dedicated the following year in a ceremony Burrier well remembers. “There was a lot of excitement for the people that had fought for so many years.”

 

More than 20 years later, the Rock Island Trail continues to grow. “It’s set to extend into downtown Peoria and on down to the Illinois River,” says Oberg. “That extension is going to be huge. People will be able to use Peoria as a starting or stopping point for the trail with all the amenities that a big city has to offer.”

 

This newer, urban section at the southern end of the Rock Island Trail is being managed by the Peoria Park District. Over the course of its development, this section has gone by a few other names, such as the Pimiteoui Trail and the Kellar Branch Trail, which are no longer officially used. When complete, the extension will run continuously from the state-owned section ending at Alta down to the Bob Michel Bridge, a distance of about 14 miles, all paved. A few short segments are currently open to the public, but the remainder is slated to be finished by the end of the year.

 

The extension provides access to two Peoria attractions that opened just last year: the stunning Riverfront Museum and the family-friendly Caterpillar Visitor Center, showcasing exhibits by the familiar black-and-yellow branded construction equipment company that’s headquartered here. Older, but no less worthwhile attractions, include the historical Springdale Cemetery founded in 1855 and Glen Oak Park, which dates back to the late 1800s and houses a zoo, botanical garden, fishing lagoon and other recreational amenities.

 

Unfortunately, heavy rainfall has caused washouts and other problems for IDNR’s portion of the trail, which has a crushed limestone surface. “Recently, there’s been damage to the trail due to some wicked storms,” says Bellovics. “We’ve closed off portions of the trail and are making repairs. There’s a closed segment of three miles between Toulon and Wyoming that includes the Spoon River bridge. Although there’s no detour signage, you can get around it easily with low-volume local roads.”

In addition to the repair work, which IDNR hopes to have mostly completed over the next few weeks, the organization is upgrading and paving all six of the trail’s access parking lots, adding new entrance signs, and creating trail kiosks. The projects should be done by the fall, in time to enjoy the trail’s bright autumn hues.

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  SEASONAL PARK ATTENDANT at Button Bay State Park, Vermont State Parks, Ferrisburgh, Vermont

 

Seasonal park attendants wanted for immediate hire. Performs general mainte-nance and park operations. Position reports to the park ranger. Must be highly motivated and enthusiastic, able to work with little supervision. Helpful friendly attitude and ability to provide excellent customer service. Duties include grounds keeping; facility and equipment maintenance; cleaning rest rooms; taking reservations and fees. Must be able to lift heavy items and work outdoors in hot and sunny or cold and rainy conditions. 40 hrs/week. Weekends included, times may vary, $8.68/hour.

Button Bay, a 253-acre park, is located on a bluff in Ferrisburgh along the 130-mile long Lake Champlain. Historically, the area has been visited by such notables as Samuel De Champlain (1609), Ethan Allen (1776), Ben Franklin (1776), and Benedict Arnold (1777). What once operated as a farm, opened as a state park in 1964. The park is so named for the button-like concretions formed by clay deposits found along the shoreline.

 

Apply online by clicking on ‘How to Apply’

 

http://www.vtstateparks.com/htm/buttonbay.htm

http://www.vtstateparks.com/htm/employment_jobs.htm

 

2.)  Russian Olive Removal and Chipping Along the Poudre River Corridor, CSFS Volunteer Program, Fort Collins, Colo.

 

Saturday, August 24

 

•We will assist Larimer County staff and volunteers in this project

•Work will take place along the Poudre River corridor near Timnath and the River Bluff’s Open Space

•We will need qualified sawyers for cutting. If you wish to cut, you must provide proof of your S212 or equivalent saw certification

•Meeting location: Fort Collins District Office, 3843 Laporte Ave., Fort Collins

•Time: 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. (we may return earlier)

•Transportation: We will carpool in CSFS vehicles

•Contact: jamie.dahl@colostate.edu

 

The CSFS Volunteer Program provides an opportunity for you to help us enhance public understanding of forestry’s role and value in a healthy natural environment through hands-on projects and training.

 

http://csfs.colostate.edu/pages/volunteer-opportunities.html

 

3.)  Wisconsin Frog and Toad Survey, Wisconsin DNR, madison, WI (Survey locations throughout the state)

 

The main goal of this survey is to determine the status, distribution, and long-term population trends of Wisconsin’s twelve frog species. Annual statewide surveys began in 1984, and it is now one of the longest running amphibian monitoring projects in North America. Participants choose an established route and conduct three night-time surveys a year: in the early spring, late spring, and summer. No formal training is necessary, but volunteers are asked to follow a simple protocol, fill out and submit data sheets, and familiarize themselves with the different frog calls.

http://dnr.wi.gov/volunteer/animals/FrogsToads.html

 

4.)  Visitor center volunteer, Wisconsin State Park System, Various locations in Wisconsin

 

•Greet visitors and provide brochures, maps, program schedules and answer questions.

•Assist park visitors with vehicle admission stickers, campsite registration and state trail passes.

•Staff a visitor center information desk or gift shop.

•Help coordinate special events.

•Help design and prepare exhibits, displays, and bulletin boards.

•Help market and advertise park programs.

•Provide newsletters, brochures, fact sheets, and information about the local area.

 

•Find a State Park, Forest, Recreation Area, or Trail (http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/parks/findapark.html).

 

http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/parks/volunteer.html

 

5.)  Tillamook State Forest, Oregon Department of Forestry, Tillamook, OR

 

On the second Saturday of September, and October, the Oregon Department of Forestry hosts trail work parties on the OHV trail network in the Tillamook State Forest that are open to the entire OHV use community.

 

OHV trail work parties focus on some new trail construction but mainly on trail maintenance such as cleaning out drainage structures, blocking illegal trails, or clearing down trees and on trail upgrades such as installing drainage structures, spreading pit run rock to harden trails, or constructing reroutes to create a more sustainable trail system.

 

In 2012, volunteers from the OHV Community donated over 1,200 hours of their time to helping the Oregon Department of Forestry maintain the trails in th Tillamook State Forest.

 

If you’d like to get involved in helping to take care of the OHV Trails you love, check out the work party calendar and plan a trip to the Tillamook State Forest around a work party date.  It’s a great opportunity to give back and to learn more about the outstanding organizations that co-host the work parties with Oregon Department of Forestry staff.

 

RSVP POLICY

Due to ODF staffing levels, a minimum of 5 volunteer RSVPs will be required in order to guarantee that a scheduled work party will take place.  If you are interested in volunteering for a particular work party please contact the staff member listed by at least 24-hours prior to the date listed on the OHV Work Party calendar.

 

For More Information

Jahmaal Rebb

OHV Specialist

Forest Grove

503.359.7463

jrebb@odf.state.or.us

 

Dave Hiatt

OHV Specialist

Tillamook

503.815.7024

dhiatt@odf.state.or.us

 

http://www.oregon.gov/odf/tillamookstateforest/pages/ohvtrailworkparty.aspx

 

6.)  Forest watch volunteers, Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Various locations

 

Would you like to be a forest watch volunteer?

 

Forest watch volunteers in DNR’s Southeast RegionWould you like to be a forest watch volunteer?

Forest watch volunteers help protect and enhance DNR-managed land while working with the public to encourage appropriate recreation use. Volunteers also educate the public about the value of natural resources and DNR’s role as steward of more than 3 million acres of state trust lands.

 

What Do Forest Watch Volunteers Do?

 

Provide information to visitors.

Monitor and observe trails, sites, and facilities.

Document and report safety concerns and suspicious or criminal activities.

 

Expectations of forest watch volunteers

 

Provide friendly, courteous information and assistance to forest visitors.

Represent  DNR in a professional manner.

Complete all required training.

Follow safety procedures.

Serve within the scope and limits of assigned volunteer responsibilities.

Accurately report observations and complete required records and timesheets.

 

Benefits  to you, as a forest watch volunteer

 

Be a part of providing an important and meaningful service in protecting and enhancing state trust lands.

Learn new skills and information.

Improve recreation trails, sites, and facilities.

Meet other people who share a passion for outdoor recreation.

Enhance your resume with documented volunteer work experience. All state, county, and municipal job openings in Washington State permit each hour of qualified volunteer service to equal one hour of required work experience.

 

Contact:

 

Ken Dean

Forest Watch Program Coordinator

360-902-1701

kenneth.dean@dnr.wa.gov

 

http://www.dnr.wa.gov/RecreationEducation/Topics/OtherRecreationInformation/Pages/amp_rec_volunteer_watch.aspx

 

7.)  Pacific Northwest Trail Volunteer Trail Crew, Pacific Northwest Trail Association, Sedro-Woolley, WA

 

The construction of the Pacific Northwest Trail has been in the process for years by work crews organized and lead by the PNTA. Some of these crews are made up of volunteers who donate their time and effort to help develop and maintain the trail. If you are looking for a challenging activity that is both enjoyable and rewarding and that gives you the chance to work in the outdoors and be with some wonderful people, you’ve come to the right place! The PNTA, along with other hiking and equestrian groups, assists the US Forest Service, National Park Service, State Parks, and other agencies with the care of the PNNST.

 

The Pacific Northwest Trail Association’s has a number of active volunteer groups that work on different sections of the trail. To find a group near you start your search here: http://www.pnt.org/Trail_Maintenance.html.

 

http://www.pnt.org/volunteer.html

 

8.)  CRANE INTERNSHIP, Audubon Species Survival Center (SSC), Audubon Nature Institute, New Orleans, LA

http://www.osnabirds.org/Jobs/CRANE-INTERNSHIP.aspx

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

9.)  Insect Keeper Intern, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO

http://bit.ly/1auuO07

 

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Communications Manager, California Native Plant Society, Sacramento, California

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=371500008

 

2.)  Avian Field Assistants: migrant use of hardwood habitats, Old Dominion University, Virginia / Maryland

 

Employment Information

 

Are you interested in our migrant work in Virginia, Maryland or our long-term woodpecker work in California?

 

2013 Virginia / Maryland Field Work – Radar Analysis of Fall Migrant Habitat Use

 

Field assistants are needed for a new collaborative project using radar to examine migrant use of hardwood forest habitat during fall migration in Virginia and Maryland. Assistants will sample hardwood forests along the Atlantic Flyway to compare with radar assessments of bird use of these habitats.

 

The research involves sampling migrants by sight and sound in addition to assessments of habitat and food resources.

 

Must be highly motivated with the ability to identify Eastern migrants by sight and sound. An ability to identify common vegetation and insects of Virginia / Maryland is preferred. Assistants will be housed in one of three locations: Wakefield, VA; Wallops Island, VA; or Berlin, MD and will involve extensive travel to field sites each day (a vehicle is required, mileage will be reimbursed). Field work is rigorous and will involve hot, humid weather, including frequent encounters with biting arthropods.

 

Positions include a monthly stipend of $1,850 and up to $500 / month housing allowance. The positions will run from 7 August through 14 November, 2013.

 

I am also recruiting a graduate student to work on this project. See the radar page for more information.

 

Current Positions (Virginia / Maryland):

 

Fall 2013: 7 Aug to 14 Nov (1 position); Wakefield, VA – OPEN

 

Fall 2013: 7 Aug to 14 Nov (2 positions); Wallops Island, VA – OPEN

 

Fall 2013: 7 Aug to 14 Nov (2 positions); Berlin, MD – OPEN

 

http://www.ericlwalters.org/employment.htm

 

3.)  Executive Director, Seattle Audubon Society, Seattle, Washington

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=428900015

 

4.)  Outreach Specialist, Center for EcoTechnology, Northampton, Massachusetts

http://www.greatgreencareers.com/green-job/30816/Outreach-Specialist-Northampton

 

5.)  Park Ranger Assistant, Sacramento County, Sacramento, CA

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/sacramento/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=96398

 

6.)  Park Ranger, Lifeguards, booth and Grounds Maintenance, Saginaw County Parks, Saginaw, MI

http://www.indeed.com/cmp/Saginaw-County-Parks/jobs/Park-Ranger-467810d01e6f6c9e

 

7.)  PARK RANGER II (RESTRICTED), Hillsborough County, Tampa, FL

http://www.jobaps.com/hill/sup/BulPreview.asp?R1=C3925&R2=AA&R3=o24124

 

8.)  Full Time Ranger, The Wildlands Conservancy, Wind Wolves Preserve, California

http://www.greatgreencareers.com/green-job/30782/Full-Time-Ranger-Wind-Wolves-Preserve

 

9.)  Outdoor School – Instructor, REI, Fairfax, VA

https://www.rei.apply2jobs.com/HVExt/index.cfm?fuseaction=mHvexternal.showPositionDetails&pid=42&lid=319

 

10.)  Park Ranger, City of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/santabarbara/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=680070

 

11.)  Marketing and Communications Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., New York, NY

 

Now in its second century, Audubon is dedicated to protecting birds and other wildlife and the habitat that supports them. Audubon’s mission is engaging people in bird conservation on a hemispheric scale through science, policy, education and on-the-ground conservation action.  By mobilizing and aligning its network of Chapters, Centers, State and Important Bird Area programs in the four major migratory flyways in the Americas, the organization will bring the full power of Audubon to bear on protecting common and threatened bird species and the critical habitat they need to survive.  And as part of BirdLife International, Audubon will join people in over 100 in-country organizations all working to protect a network of Important Bird Areas around the world, leveraging the impact of actions they take at a local level.  What defines Audubon’s unique value is a powerful grassroots network of nearly 500 local chapters, 23 state offices, 43 Audubon Centers, Important Bird Area Programs in 46 states, and 700 staff across the country.  Audubon is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE).

 

Position Summary:

 

The Marketing and Communications Intern will have the opportunity to build connections among Audubon staff and supporters. The position will include creating polished donor and staff communication documents, as well as actively assisting in the development of external facing marketing and communications efforts both online and in print. This is a part-time, paid internship, working approximately 20 hours per week from August, 2013 through October, 2013. The position reports to the Marketing and Communications Coordinator.

 

Essential Functions:

 

The position will include:

•Assisting with writing, editing, and designing communications for print, email and web

•Collecting, editing, and managing photo assets

•Analytics and reporting

•Occasional administrative tasks

•Other activities as needed to support the marketing and communications team

 

Qualifications and Experience:

•Excellent writing and editing skills.

•Superior organizational skills; attention to detail a must.

•Polished and professional, confident in communication with executive leaders.

•Some experience designing for print (InDesign) and/or web (including HTML for web and HTML email) a plus

 

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1806/marketing-and-communications-intern/job

 

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

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Your Very Next Step newsletter for June 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for June 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.”

– T. S. Eliot

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

***  This edition of Your Very Next Step comes to you from the “Lion City,” Singapore.

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 591 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:
***  UAE and India

***  Singapore

***  Indigo hair

***  This is the place to stop for South Indian coffee in Bangalore, or that’s what they say.

***  This is the best biryani in Hyderabad

***  Breakfast in Bangalore:

***  This is South Indian fast food

***  Pyramid power

***  The Moxie Festival in Lisbon, Maine

***  Samoa Air says “Super-size me!”

***  Singapore’s Dragon Kilns

***  Avoid Wildlife Encounters this Summer

***  This is fascinating.  Before your flight, Etihad invites you to “bid” on an upgrade

***  Pitch A Tent

***  Emirates Airline to Open World’s First Indoor Aviation-Themed Attraction

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: June 2013

Iowa’s Trolley Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer and make a difference in Cusco, Peru! Peru Volunteer and Travel, Cusco, Peru / Sebastopol, CA

2.)  NPS Great Smokey Mountains Environmental Education Internship, American Conservation Experience, Cherokee, NC

3.)  Volunteer in the Cerrado/Atlantic Forest Paraguay, Para La Tierra Voluntary & Interns Paraguay, America South

4.)  Summer Camp Counselor & Adventure Guide, Mammoth Mountain, Mammoth Lakes, CA

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Adventure Center Attendant, Loon Mountain Resort, Lincoln, NH

2.)  Adventure Ridge Hiking Guide – Full Time – Summer 2013, Vail Resorts, Vail, CO

3.)  Adventure Guide, The Highland Center, Appalachian Mountain Club, Crawford Notch, NH

4.)  Social Media Coordinator, The Sportsman Channel, Inc., New Berlin, WI

5.)  Social Media Senior Specialist, Cabela’s, Denver, CO

6.)  Director of Marketing and Communications, Audubon Naturalist Society, Chevy Chase, Maryland

7.)  Fishing Guide, Xanterra Parks & Resorts (Authorized Concessioner of the National Park Service), Yellowstone Lake, Montana

8.)  Senior Manager, Media Outreach Strategy, Rainforest Alliance, New York, NY or London, UK

9.)  Adventure Trip Leader, YMCA, Putnam Valley, NY

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  UAE and India

 

I will relate my saga of the “Tier Status Match” with Etihad when the saga is complete.  Please stand by.

 

I called Etihad to ensure they had my TSA Pre Chek/CBP Global Entry number on my reservation.  I was unable to use Pre-Chek when leaving for Abu Dhabi, but there was no line so no big deal.  The return from overseas is where the Global Entry number would come in handy.  It all has to be on my record, and you can’t just show your card when you arrive.Anyway, calling Etihad was frustrating because the ticket agent didn’t know what I was talking about.

 

Dinner on Etihad was a very acceptable lamb biryani.  I opted for that instead of cajun chicken.  The flight attendant told me, “We don’t get  many Americans on this flight…mostly Indians.

 

The mid-flight goodies included caramel popcorn.

 

Fell asleep just after midnight EDT and woke up around 7:20 EDT, which was 3:20 p.m. in AUH.

So I definitely got some sleep.  That was  the good news.  The bad news is I might have had a hard time getting to sleep when I finally got to the hotel late in the evening.  As it turned out I grabbed something to eat and then slept for about four hours and so I was okay..

 

When leaving Abu Dhabi for India I took a cab to the airport.  I told the taxi driver terminal 1 A.  He dropped me at terminal 1.  He kept the change before I could get it from him.  No big deal.  I couldn’t find Air India, and must have looked lost, because I was finally guided to a series of level and course changes to get me out, down and around to an entrance modestly market  1A which had a line out into the taxi waiting area a mile long.  And not just a line, these were men headed home with several giant bundles for luggage for each of them.  Big bundles, lashed up with rope.  I had to go back outside to the end of the line.  But eventually it started to move, and I with it.  At some poiunt somebody came and got me and took me to the front of the line (I only had one rollerboard insstead of giant bundles.  I was also moved to a shorter line to get my ticket.  Everyone was amazed that I was going to Delhi on this flight.  My theory is the entire plane was booked by a labor broker(s) who were sending people home after working in the UAE for some time.  I went through passport control and headed to the gate, which was not yet open.  When I made my reservation there was nobody else, according to the seat assignment chart.  However, this plane was definitely full, and when I looked at my boarding pass I noticed that my seat waas changed from a window up front to something else somewhere in the back.  I was sitting in the terminal waiting for the gate to open when an Air India rep came to me to ask me what kind of meal I wanted: vehg or non-veg.  I told him that a non-vegetarian meal would be great (Me being a meat eater and all).  I mentioned to him that my seat assignment had changed, and he said that could be taken care of when the gate opened. But he returned a minute later with my new boarding pass in business class.

 

I’m offered juice.  Orange or grapes.  I choose grapes juice.

 

I theorize why the plane looked empty when I checked the seating chart when I booked my ticket:  the plane is full of guest workers returning home,  and the seats were probably booked in bulk by a broker.

 

The flight attendants are striking.  They’re wearing blank saris with a red, black and white pattern, and way more midriff than you’ll ever see on United–which is good on both counts.

 

The plane is all men, except for two women.  One travelling alone, and another with her husband and two very small children.  Myself and the women are in first class.  The husband wants to stay with his family but his told he must sit in his assigned seat in the back.  The flight attendants apologize, but they do not have the authority, they tell him.  He implorers them, and finally a gate agent goes off and comes back with approval to let the man sit next to his wwife, with one of the children on his lap.  Good call, Air India.

 

This A319 is painted in Indian Airlines livery.  Indian was the state-owned domestic airline and Air India the international airline of India.

 

Now its one company, and there several competitors.

 

I have the non-veg meal.  It’s lamb biryani (I think that’s what its called).  Pretty good until I have that green bean in the salad, only to find it’s actually a hot pepper.  Yowza.  There’s Sterile Brand yogurt…just like home made it says.  I never made yogurt at home.

 

***  Singapore:

 

I really like Singapore.  It’s neat, clean and safe.  It’s Asian and exotic with out the smells of smoke and sewage.  It reminds me of Hawaii.  In fact, Singapore is about half the size of Oahu in land area, and has more than five times as many people, almost 5.2 million.

 

***  Indigo hair

 

I flew Indigo Airlines recently.  Indigo is a low-cost carrier with new planes and a yoiuthful staff.  The flight attendants are attractive, but they all have a fem-bot similarity: same height, same outfit, same hat, same lipstick, same hair.  It’s sort of “Mad Men” retro look.  At first I thought it was just me, thinking I was watching a Robert Palmer music video, but they all looked the same.  I looked it up online and sure enough, the Indigo girls have to either cut and coif their hair just so, or wear a wig!

 

***  This is the place to stop for South Indian coffee in Bangalore, or that’s what they say.

 

Our guides for the afternoon were young and enthusiastic communications students: Anwar Hussein, Arpitha Jain and Deepthi Pandit.  They took us to the Gavi Gangadheeshwara Temple cave temple in Bangalore:

http://www.goplaces.in/blog/the-gavi-gangadhareshwara-cave-temple-in-bangalore/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hulimavu_cave_Temple

 

We also went to the Bull Temple, Dodda Basavana Gudi, dedicated to the sacred Hindu demi-god Nandi, located in the Bugle Rock gardens.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodda_Ganeshana_Gudi

 

Anwar, Arpitha and Deepthi then took Wilma, Susan and I to Brahmin’s Café.

 

We had idly (rice pancakes); vada (fried spicy donut); khara bhath (spicy semolina) and kesari bhath (sweet semolina).

http://bangalore.burrp.com/listing/brahmins-coffee-bar_sankarapuram_bangalore_fast-food-shops/110279099

 

***  This is the best biryani in Hyderabad:

http://www.paradisefoodcourt.com/

 

***  Breakfast in Bangalore:

http://adigas.in/

 

***  This is South Indian fast food.

 

My friend, Elizabeth, handed me a fried hot chili pepper to taste.  I thought she said to eat the whole thing.  I put the whole thing in my mouth and two women who were watch nearly died from shock.  If I could have captured the look on their faces.  One of them said “take it out!!”  Which I did, but then proceeded to eat the entire thing anyway.

 

Oh, yes, and they have these nifty burger thingies, too.

 

http://www.golivadapav.com/

 

***  Pyramid power

 

http://www.ishafoundation.org/Ishakriya?gclid=CL3eqoqI2LcCFYsF4godalQAMA

 

http://pyramidvalley.org/pyramid/Home/maitreyabuddhapyramid.htm

 

ttp://pyramidvalley.org/pyramid/home/aboutus.htm
http://pyramidvalley.org/pyramid/images/campus1_l.jpg

 

***  The Moxie Festival in Lisbon, Maine

 

2013 Moxie Festival Dates: July 12-14

 

Join Moxie lovers from Maine, the US and abroad at the one and only Moxie Festival.

 

Fireworks! Car Show! Pow-wow! Parade! 5K Run! Chief Worumbo Androscoggin River Race!

Concert in the Park!

 

http://moxiefestival.com/

 

***  Samoa Air says “Super-size me!”

 

The world’s first airline to charge people according to their weight is set to introduce an “executive row”, with extra space and no armrests, to cater for bigger passengers.

 

Samoa’s domestic airline Samoa Air made headlines this year when it introduced a pay-by-weight fare system.

 

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=10890196

 

***  Singapore’s Dragon Kilns

 

In the early 1980’s Singapore still had three Dragon Kilns, Sam Mui Kwang, Thow Kwang and Guan Huat. Today just two remain, and urbanization threaten them, too.

 

Although the dragon kilns are not ancient, they originated in China 2,000 years ago and brought to Singapore by Chinese immigrants in the early 1900s. At one time there were more than a dozen, which were used to make ceramic vessels to collect latex from rubber trees.

 

The Wood-fired dragon kiln looks like fire-breathing dragon with fire spewing from its nostrils. Although not used regularly any more, there is still a community of potters who have their studios there, and there have been occasions where the kilns have been used fairly recently in a limited capacity.

 

***  Avoid Wildlife Encounters this Summer

By Michele C. Hollow of Pet News and Views

http://petnewsandviews.com/2013/06/avoid-wildlife-encounters-this-summer

 

***  This is fascinating.  Before your flight, Etihad invites you to “bid” on an upgrade.  But believe me, there’s nothing here that comes cheap.

 

Dear EDWARD H LUNDQUIST,

 

Etihad Airways is delighted to inform you that the following segments of your upcoming flights are now eligible for an upgrade to the next higher cabin – Pearl Business Class *

 

Booking Reference: CBWYIV

FLIGHT DATE     FROM   TO          TIME

EY130    1 Jun ’13               Washington        Abu Dhabi           22:15

EY287    10 Jun ’13             Bangalore            Abu Dhabi           04:50

EY131    10 Jun ’13             Abu Dhabi           Washington        10:00

The flight information above is only for flights eligible for upgrade. For details of all your flights, please refer to your E ticket.

 

All you need to do to upgrade from Coral Economy Class is:

•             Make us an offer by clicking here

•             Enter your Payment Information

•             Review and Submit

If your offer has been accepted, you will receive a confirmation mail no later than 24 hours prior to departure along with your new E-ticket. Please note your credit card will be charged only if your bid is successful. For more details click here.

If you are not yet a member of our award-winning loyalty programme – Etihad Guest -why not join today by clicking here to enroll. As an Etihad Guest member, you can earn Etihad Guest Miles every time you fly with us or with our global partners. The Etihad Guest Miles can be redeemed against flights, upgrades or over 2900 products from our Reward Shop.

* Etihad chauffeur services will not be available for upgrades from Coral Economy Class to Pearl Business Class

 

Isn’t it time you upgraded with the best?

 

***  Pitch A Tent

 

Heading out with your new tent this Memorial Day weekend? Check out Campmor’s blog for some stress free tips on setting up your tent.

http://outdoors.campmor.com/how-to-pitch-a-tent-tips/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=TrailMail-May242013&cm_pla=50786&cm_ven=EMAIL&utm_campaign=TRAILMAIL&utm_medium=50786&utm_source=TrailMail-May242013

 

***  From Bernie Wagenblast’s TCN Newsletter:

Emirates Airline to Open World’s First Indoor Aviation-Themed Attraction

Link to article in Arabian Business:

http://www.arabianbusiness.com/emirates-open-world-s-first-aviation-attraction-504861.html

Link to news release: http://goo.gl/rJZoB

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: June 2013

Iowa’s Trolley Trail

By Laura Stark

 

“There are unique recreational opportunities in both towns and the trail allows access to both.”

 

From nostalgic train buffs to cherubic Thomas the Tank Engine aficionados, the Trolley Trail in north-central Iowa has something for everyone. Although only six miles long, there are so many nearby attractions that a visitor could easily make a day trip out of it.

 

Brian Pauly, superintendent of recreation for Mason City, lives four blocks from the Trolley Trail. “It’s a great trail that links Mason City and Clear Lake,” he says. “There are unique recreational opportunities in both towns and the trail allows access to both.”

 

The trail gets its name from the trolley line it parallels that began shuttling passengers between the two towns in 1897. Although it stopped carrying passengers in 1936, the Iowa Traction Railway continues to ship cargo. “It’s the last electric freight railroad in North America,” says Michael Johns, the general manager for the Iowa Traction Railway.

 

“It works the industries on the west side of Mason City,” says Dennis Wilson, chairman of the Friends of the 457, a local volunteer group. “A lot of people come and photograph it.”

 

Trains run several times a week, but when asked if they posed a risk for trail-goers, Johns says there are no safety concerns. This comes as no surprise to Kelly Pack, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy trail development director and the lead author of a new report on rail-with-trail projects like this one.

 

“It’s been more than a decade since the last rail-with-trail report and we’ve seen a substantial growth in rail-with-trails around the country,” says Pack. “And they continue to have an excellent safety record.” The new report, anticipated to come out in July, will provide examples of rail-with-trail projects of varying lengths and styles, as well as updated technical resources and contacts for the trail-building community.

 

Before the Trolley Trail was built, the danger for bicyclists and walkers in the community wasn’t trains—it was cars. Precipitating the push for the trail in 1988 was a tragic accident in which a teenager was killed as he was biking along the road between Mason City and Clear Lake. When the Trolley Trail was opened to the public in 1990, it was a welcome addition to the surrounding communities. Efforts now center on making more of these essential connections.

 

“Our goal is to make Mason City a bikeable and walkable user-friendly community,” says Bill Stangler, the city’s operations and maintenance manager. “We have a number of trails, but they just start and end. The concept is to link everything together.” Mason City is also working on a Complete Streets initiative.”

 

Long ago, Mason City sported a transportation network of another kind: railroads. “Mason City was a railroad hub a hundred years ago,” says Johns. “At least five big railroads were in town.”

 

An unusual remnant of this industrial past is Big Blue, an old quarry pit at the east end of the Trolley Trail that naturally filled with water over the years and is now a recreational hot spot, especially for fishing. Scuba divers that venture into its 80-foot depths can still see old mining equipment.

 

Less than two miles from Big Blue is a reminder of the town’s more elegant past. Last year, Condé Nast Traveler named Mason City one of the World’s Best Cities for Architecture Lovers, due to the large collection of “Prairie School” buildings in the community. This style of architecture, designed to be reminiscent of expansive prairie landscapes, was made famous by Frank Lloyd Wright, himself a Midwesterner, who lived in Mason City in the early 20th century. Wright’s Stockman House, constructed in 1908, is now an interpretative center and can be toured. A few blocks away the Historic Park Inn Hotel, the last remaining hotel that he designed, is also worth a visit.

 

Another mile east from here is East Park, which Pauly calls “a gem of the community.” Here, the Friends of the 457 are bringing a Minneapolis and St. Louis Railroad steam engine back to its original 1912 look. Although the restoration is purely cosmetic, the engine gives the appearance of running courtesy of a strategically placed fogger in its smokestack and a CD of steam-engine sound that’s played during demonstrations.

 

A local Rotary Club had started the project back in the 1950s and, after starts and stops, the restoration is now nearly complete. In 1959 the engine was dubbed “Cannonball” in a naming contest run by the local newspaper; the winner: an 8-year-old girl who spent her $25 earnings on a new puppy.

 

Over the past 10 years, the community has been incredibly supportive of the project. The display has been closed since last August, so that volunteers could work on repairing the engine’s boiler jacket—the final piece of the restoration—and “every day they’re asking, ‘when are you going to be done?'” says Wilson. He hopes the answer is June 29, when the Friends of the 457 hosts its annual Cannonball Day. As their website proclaims, the event is for anyone that loves trains and will include a children’s fun run, live music, talent contest, and chicken barbecue.

 

At the trail’s opposite end lies Trolley Park, where another group of volunteers offers rides on a diesel locomotive around a short track as part of a private, educational museum. The big engine is especially popular with children. “When we get six-year-olds, they think they’ve died and gone to heaven,” says Stan Gentry, president of the Mason City and Clear Lake Electric Railroad Historical Society.

 

But teaching railroad history to young crowds is not always easy, as Gentry explains: “When kids come, their minds go everywhere. Sometimes you’ll have 15 seconds, sometimes 15 minutes, so you go with the flow.”

 

In addition to the working diesel engine, the group is building a replica of an 1869 wood-burning steam locomotive. When completed next year, it will be a Victorian beauty in dark green and bright red with shiny brass and gold-leaf trimmings. An old handcar (like the kind Wile E. Coyote used to chase down the Road Runner) can also be pumped down the track. Gentry jokes that this ride is more popular with the hardier bicycle crowd.

 

From here, reaching Clear Lake itself is an easy journey of less than two miles. “Once you get off the trail, follow Main Avenue west, and you run right into the lake,” says Libbey Patton, director of tourism for the Clear Lake Chamber of Commerce. Forged by glaciers, such a naturally made lake is unusual for the state and has helped propel the city into a tourist hub with visitors flocking here during the summer months.

 

“We got a bike rental program going last year because so many people came to town and wanted to ride bikes,” says Patton. Available at the lake’s visitor center, the rentals are a beach cruiser style to “fit the theme of the town,” says Patton.

 

Less than a mile north of the visitor center is the Surf Ballroom, a rock-n-roll landmark and museum where Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and The Big Bopper gave their last concert before their tragic deaths in a plane crash. Concerts still play in the dancehall that sports a gleaming hardwood floor, a stage hugged by palm trees, and 50s-style diner booths.

 

The Trolley Trail already joins two great towns, Clear Lake and Mason City. In the future, more communities will be hooked into the network once plans develop for an as yet unnamed rail-trail along a corridor purchased from Union Pacific Railroad. Although salvage work has been completed, the corridor has 19 bridges that need to be redecked and railed.

 

“Our agency has a rail bed in the southwest corner of Mason City extending down through the county to Thornton,” says Fred Heinz, director of the Cerro Gordo County Conservation Board, which manages the Trolley Trail and other public areas throughout the county. “It’s 21 miles. Now we just need the funding to create it. It’s a big undertaking.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Volunteer and make a difference in Cusco, Peru! Peru Volunteer and Travel, Cusco, Peru / Sebastopol, CA

http://www.peruvolunteerandtravel.com/en/volunteer-programs/cusco

 

2.)  NPS Great Smokey Mountains Environmental Education Internship, American Conservation Experience, Cherokee, NC

http://usaconservationepic.applicantpool.com/jobs/1750-3873.html

 

3.)  Volunteer in the Cerrado/Atlantic Forest Paraguay, Para La Tierra Voluntary & Interns Paraguay, America South

http://www.environmentjobs.com/green-jobs/volunteer-in-the-cerradoatlantic-forest-paraguay.9538.htm

 

4.)  Summer Camp Counselor & Adventure Guide, Mammoth Mountain, Mammoth Lakes, CA

http://jobs.mammothmountain.com/season/jobdetail.cfm?opening_id=3156

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Adventure Center Attendant, Loon Mountain Resort, Lincoln, NH

http://loonmtn.com/info/winter/JobDetails.aspx?page=/collagepages/Jobs/Adventure_Center_Att.aspx.xml

 

2.)  Adventure Ridge Hiking Guide – Full Time – Summer 2013, Vail Resorts, Vail, CO

https://career4.successfactors.com/career?career_ns=job_listing&company=Vail&navBarLevel=JOB_SEARCH&rcm_site_locale=en_US&career_job_req_id=33026

 

3.)  Adventure Guide, The Highland Center, Appalachian Mountain Club, Crawford Notch, NH

 

The Adventure Guide is responsible for the delivery of all Highland Center programs and activities as well as other specialty programs at AMC destinations.  The Adventure Guide will act as an interpretive and informational resource to guests at the Highland Center, providing high-quality customer service during non-program times. The Adventure Guide will report to the Adventure Programs Manager and work with fellow staff and volunteers to develop and implement high quality educational and recreational programs for guests and visitors.

 

Job Responsibilities

Deliver outdoor and indoor education and/or recreation related programs in and around the Highland Center throughout the day, on topics ranging from natural and cultural history to backcountry safety and resource conservation.

• Lead outdoor programs, including but not limited to: ½ day to full day and overnight hikes in the area in all types of weather.

• Deliver special programs, including but not limited to:

• New member weekends and other themed weekends at the Highland Center.

• 50+ senior program weeks.

• Family Adventure Camps (full week and weekend).

• Holiday week premium programming during holiday vacation weeks.

• Day long and multi-day overnight trips in the backcountry for groups.

• Interpretive programs at the Bretton Woods Resort.

• Teambuilding programs for groups

• Outdoor skills programs including: map & compass, orienteering, camping, firemaking, and Leave No Trace.

• Winter-specific programs including: Nordic ski clinics & tours, snowshoe clinics & tours, and winter camping/survival.

• Deliver short informative presentations daily to guests at breakfast and dinner.

• Assist in developing and maintaining passive educational materials, including program manuals, on-site libraries and games, self guided activities, posters and displays.

• Act as an interpretive resource for guests, visitors, volunteers, and staff when on duty.

• Prepare and submit all program reports and assignments as instructed.

• Cross-train in order to support other departments at the Highland Center, including front desk staff.

• Perform all other duties within the AMC as assigned.

 

Employment Standards

At least 2 years of related program leading experience, including solid backcountry skills and experience, and demonstrated ability to lead groups in the outdoors.

• Practical and academic background in environmental education, natural history, or recreation is required.

• Certification in WFA is required; WFR is preferred.

• Ability to develop and lead all programs at all AMC destinations is required.

• Physical ability to travel to all AMC destinations in all weather conditions is required, carrying loads of up to 40 pounds in a backpack, hiking on unimproved trails.

• Strong organizational and written/verbal communication skills.

• Excellent guest service skills and a demonstrated commitment to AMC goals.

• Willingness to work weekends, holidays, and evenings.

• Must be over 18 years old, preferably 21 (to comply with driving standards). Must hold valid driver s license and be able to pass a DOT medical exam.

• Safe driving record and practices, as verified through a driving history record check.

• AMC has zero tolerance for the abuse of children. Any employee or intern with access to children will have a criminal record check performed and have references checked regarding their past work with children.

 

Compensation

The Adventure Guide is a full-time seasonal position. Pay starts at $9.50/hour. On-site housing is available for seasonal

 

https://apply.coolworks.com/amc/job-details.asp?JobID=22846

 

***  From Jeff Carrigan:

 

4.)  Social Media Coordinator, The Sportsman Channel, Inc., New Berlin, WI

 

Organization Profile

Launched in 2003, Sportsman Channel is the only television and digital media company fully devoted to the more than 82 million sportsmen in the United States, delivering entertaining and educational programming focused exclusively on hunting, shooting and fishing activities. Sportsman Channel is now available in HD, check with your local cable or satellite provider. Acquired by InterMedia Outdoors Holdings in 2006, Sportsman Channel reaches more than 31.2 million U.S. television households and is a part of the nation’s largest multimedia company targeted exclusively to serving the information and entertainment needs of outdoors enthusiasts. Visit www.thesportsmanchannel.com, follow on Twitter, @SPORTSMANchnl (www.twitter.com/SPORTSMANchnl), become a Fan on Facebook, www.facebook.com/sportsmanchannel and download Sportsman App at www.itunes.com/appstore.

 

Job Overview

Sportsman Channel, the leader in outdoor programming for the American Sportsman, is seeking a Social Media Coordinator. The individual in this position is responsible for executing the company’s social media strategy, developing brand awareness, generating web traffic and coordinating content for all social/mobile platforms.

 

Job Description

Responsibilities:

•Implement Sportsman Channel’s social media strategy while coordinating with all internal departments on marketing and sales obligations, company-wide initiatives and the promotion of the linear channel.

•Coordinate Sportsman’s presence and day-to-day activities on social networking sites including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and other similar community sites, as well as manage the content on our company blog.

•Coordinate and manage all social media advertising while providing detailed reports, analysis and executive summaries to each department of the company.

•Monitor effective benchmarks for measuring the impact of social media programs, and analyze, review, and report on effectiveness of campaigns in an effort to maximize results.

•Manage and respond to all questions, comments and requests on all social media accounts.

•Coordinate content and marketing initiatives with show producers, clients, and other partners.

•Keep the marketing and digital services departments updated on new trends, applications and advancements in social media.

•Perform all other duties that may be assigned to meet business needs.

 

Job Qualifications

Education and Experience:

•Bachelor’s Degree in a marketing, communications or related field. 2+ years of experience working with social media.

•Excellent verbal and written communications skills are required.

•High level of attention to detail.

•Proficiency in Photoshop, and basic knowledge of web design and HTML coding.

•Some video editing experience using Final Cut is a plus.

•Demonstrated ability to work independently as well as with a team in a fast-paced environment and produce under tight deadlines with multiple priorities.

•Proven track record of social media success on platforms such as YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Google +, Instagram, Pinterest and track record of building and maintaining communities and blogger relationships.

•Basic knowledge and experience in hunting, shooting and fishing is required.

 

Compensation & Benefits

We offer a competitive compensation and benefits package.

 

How To Apply

Qualified candidates should submit letter of interest with salary expectations and resume in confidence via email or fax. Please indicate the title of the position for which you are applying.

 

Mail: Sportsman Channel, Inc. ATTN: Director, Human Resources, 2855 South James Drive, Suite 101, New Berlin, Wisconsin 53151

 

Email: hr@thesportsmanchannel.com

Fax: (262) 432.9138

 

To learn more about The Sportsman Channel, please visit us at www.thesportsmanchannel.com and facebook.com/sportsmanchannel. Due to the volume of resumes we receive, we can only contact the most qualified candidates. We appreciate your consideration. We conduct background checks on all final candidates being considered for employment.

 

http://www.bigshoesnetwork.com/find_job_details.aspx?id=7255

 

***  From Andrew Hudson’s Job List:

 

5.)  Social Media Senior Specialist, Cabela’s, Denver, CO

 

Do you want to work for the leader in the outdoor industry? Then apply today to join the Cabela’s team. Cabela’s has an opening for a Social Media Senior Specialist in the E-Commerce department in Denver, Co

 

JOB DESCRIPTION:

 

The Social Media SR Specialist will work within the Social Media team to execute the day to day activities within the Cabela’s Social Media programs. This position will be responsible for the execution of Social Media specific content and campaigns as determined by the Social Media strategy and the needs of the business and will communicate and inform the overall social media strategy with feedback from day to day interactions with customers via social media. Working closely with other marketing programs, the Social Media SR Specialist works to maximize Cabela’s engagement and reach with its customer base via social media marketing. This position will be a key voice of Cabela’s as it crafts and communicates posts, content and responses to customer interactions with the Cabela’s brand. Building and communicating regular reporting of program specific KPI’s and representing Social Media in omni, category and digital commerce planning will also be critical to success. The Social Media SR Specialist will also be an evangelist for social media in key tactical marketing meetings. The SR Specialist works closely with cross functional teams including Digital Commerce, Design, Brand Marketing, Retail Marketing and more. This position is a key contact for the day to day relationships with Cabela’s customers and our agency partners.

 

KEY DUTIES:

 

Execute against the Social Media strategy, coordinating with stakeholders across all channels of Cabela’s to ensure its effectiveness and maximizing customer engagement and reach.

Build and execute Social Media content and campaigns and related day-to-day activities including monitoring on and off network social media activity, crafting and posting content and commentary as well as responding directly to customer feedback and communicating to other internal departments where necessary.

Work with all other marketing teams, merchandising teams and business units to ensure Social Media programs are fully integrated with all related marketing and merchandising activity to drive maximum customer engagement and reach..

Monitor and communicate performance against effective benchmarks for measuring the impact of Social media. Analyze, review, and report on effectiveness of Social Media efforts in order to maximize results.

 

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:

 

Bachelor’s degree with 2-4+ years of experience

Experience working with social media for B2C businesses. Knowledge, experience and understanding of the digital media space. Experience and knowledge of social media platforms, successful communication strategies and paid marketing opportunities within social med. Experience and knowledge of other online marketing programs.

 

Cabela’s is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and we seek to create an inclusive work place that embraces diverse backgrounds, life experiences and perspectives.

 

Cabela’s offers a competitive benefits package to include: 401k, vacation, profit sharing, health and dental coverage for you and your family, relocation assistance, and employee discounts.

 

https://sjobs.brassring.com/tgwebhost/jobdetails.aspx?jobId=908601

 

6.)  Director of Marketing and Communications, Audubon Naturalist Society, Chevy Chase, Maryland

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=423100010

 

7.)  Fishing Guide, Xanterra Parks & Resorts (Authorized Concessioner of the National Park Service), Yellowstone Lake, Montana

 

About the Job…

 

The Fishing Guides pilot watercraft and host fishing excursions for Yellowstone guests; safely navigating Yellowstone Lake waters while offering fishing technique instruction and interpretive information to participants. This position requires solid knowledge of fishing in fresh water, the ability to operate small and midsize watercraft on one of North America’s largest high-altitude lakes during a variety of weather conditions, while providing knowledgeable, interpretive commentary of Park features and history. Our Guides must enjoy spending time with multiple guests in conditions that require excellent teaching, communication and guest service skills.

 

Uniform for this position is provided by the company. The employee must provide proper footwear for marina and boating environments.

 

REPORTING RELATIONSHIPS:

 

Reports directly to the Marina Manager.

 

RESPONSIBILITIES:

•Operates assigned charter boat in lawful manner.

•Conducts guided trips on Yellowstone Lake aboard assigned boat.

•Provides customers with services requested according to Company policy.

•Instructs customers in fishing techniques and usage of equipment.

•Advises customers regarding fishing regulations.

•Secures and maintains assigned boats including: fueling cleaning and identifying maintenance issues.

•Instruct guests on emergency procedures, basic boating safety and radio usage.

•Assists in the scenic cruise operations as assigned.

•Assists in the rental boat operation as assigned.

•Completes required paperwork.

•Must provide fishing equipment to simultaneously outfit a minimum of three guests.

•Must provide appropriate clothing to work outdoors in varying weather conditions.

•Performs other duties as assigned.

 

SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE:

•Basic seamanship skills, must pass written and practical examinations.

•Knowledge of NPS boating and fishing regulations.

•Must be able to instruct guests in fishing techniques to ensure the maximum possibility of success.

•Communication skills

•Knowledge of park geography and history with a focus on the Lake area.

•Knowledge of rules and procedures for use of marine band radio.

•Knowledge of safety, emergency and life-saving procedures.

•Must possess a current CPR and first aid certification.

•Knowledge of local weather patterns.

•Knowledge of department and Company policies and procedures.

 

PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS:

•Must provide proof of Medical Examination stating fitness for holding a commercial boat operators position.

•Must be capable of lifting objects of up to 50 pounds.

•Must be capable of bending, lifting and standing throughout a 10-hour shift.

•Must be able to work outdoors in varying weather conditions for extended periods of time.

•Must be able to work at elevations in excess of 7700 feet.

 

AUTHORITIES:

•Authority to make decisions regarding the vessel and passengers to ensure the safety of passengers and vessel.

•Regulate activities of customers while under way, to ensure the safety of passengers and vessel.

•Report problems to Marina Manager or Assistant Manager.

http://www.yellowstonejobs.com/Fishing-Guide-7852.html

 

8.)  Senior Manager, Media Outreach Strategy, Rainforest Alliance, New York, NY or London, UK

 

The Rainforest Alliance is an international nonprofit organization that works to conserve biodiversity and ensure sustainable livelihoods by transforming land-use practices, business practices and consumer behaviour. Based in New York City, with offices throughout the United States and worldwide, the Rainforest Alliance works with people whose livelihoods depend on the land, helping them transform the way they grow food, harvest wood and host travelers.

 

Position Summary:

 

Based in London or New York City, the Senior Manager, Media Outreach Strategy will be responsible for developing and overseeing strategies for the effective use of creative content aimed at increasing awareness of the Rainforest Alliance’s mission and work among the organization’s wide-ranging stakeholders worldwide. S/he will guide and collaborate with colleagues, businesses, NGOs, government representatives, journalists and others to ensure that they have the tools and information necessary to promote and inform their audiences about the organization’s achievements.

 

Responsibilities:

 

•Drive media outreach and other promotional strategies for the organization as a whole and for specific targeted audiences in order to meet programmatic objectives;

•Track media developments and trends, cultivating new media relationships where appropriate and continually seeking out promotional vehicles and opportunities;

•Collaborate closely with staff and representatives working with media in other countries to ensure efforts and messages are consistent;

•Position key Rainforest Alliance staff members as spokespeople and to promote organizational thought leadership;

•Prepare for and orchestrate responses to media crisis;

•Analyze effectiveness of the communications tools used by the organization; and

•Other duties as assigned.

 

Qualifications:

 

•Bachelor’s degree in Communications or Journalism;

•10 years’ experience in journalism, public relations, or nonprofit, government or business communications;

•Proven track record in strategic media outreach and marketing work;

•Strong project management and organizational skills;

•Experience in managing staff;

•Demonstrated interest in conservation, corporate social responsibility and/or international development issues;

•Superior written, verbal, organizational, analytical and interpersonal skills;

•Flexibility and willingness to work independently on a wide range of tasks and projects;

•Proven ability to prioritize tasks and work efficiently in a fast-paced environment; and

•Written and verbal proficiency in a foreign language preferred.

 

Salary: Commensurate with experience. Competitive benefits package provided

The Rainforest Alliance is an equal opportunity employer.

 

Application Instructions

 

Send resume, cover letter and salary history to Human Resources, Rainforest Alliance, 233 Broadway, 28th Floor, New York, NY 10279; Fax: 212-677-2187; E-mail: Personnel@ra.org. If emailing, use the following format in the subject line: first name and last name, job title and position you are applying for.

 

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=397100014

 

9.)  Adventure Trip Leader, YMCA, Putnam Valley, NY

http://www.ymca.net/career-opportunities/camp-positions.html?key=3313

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for May 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for May 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Me thinks that the moment my legs begin to move, my thoughts begin to flow.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

***  This edition of Your Very Next Step comes to you from Auburndale, Massachusetts ,

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 591 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:
***  Ned, the Alien’s have landed!

***  When an aircraft goes into a stall…

*** Hiking 101: Stay safe in the sun

***  20 Best Hotel Pools Around the World

***  CampMor’s OUTDOOR SOCKS 101

***  New airline fees that will make you hot

***  National Trails Day

***  Fight Comic

***  Singapore’s DRAGON BOAT RACES

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: May 2013

Virginia’s Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Nicodemus Wilderness Project , Help Save Our Environment & Wildlife, SIOUX FALLS,  SD

2.)  Volunteering with Adventure program, Plan My Volunteering PVN Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal

3.)  Excavating Another Dinosaur, Williams Spring Archeological Dig,  Passport in Time Program, Medicine Bow-Routt NF, near Newcastle, SD

4.)  Wilderness Ranger (BWCAW),  Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, Ely, MN

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Sonoma Youth Ecology Corps Crew Leader, Conservation Corps North Bay, Cotati, California

2.)  Outreach & Public Relations Coordinator, Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation, Camp Hill, PA

3.)  Kayaking & Snorkeling Guide, La Jolla Sea Cave Kayaks, La Jolla, CA

4.)  Event Intern- US Open of Surfing (Summer 2013), IMG, Los Angeles, CA

5.)  Paddleboard Instructor, SUP Iowa, Inc, Okoboji, IA

6.)  Alligator/Zebra Handler and Photographer, Wild Florida, Saint Cloud, FL

7.)  Boat Washer/Dock Master, Freedom Boat Club, Palmetto, FL

8.)  Director of Education, Audubon Canyon Ranch, Glen Ellen, California

9.)  Administrative Assistant, Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation, Philadelphia, PA

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned, the Alien’s have landed!

 

Hi Ned,

 

Here’s a destination you may want to keep an eye on for a future visit or “Your Very Next Step” mention. Aurora, Texas is trying to get a UFO festival off the ground and the “alien” mascot is named Ned.

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Texas-Roswell-considers-exploiting-alien-visit-4488887.php (I’ll send you the full print version via snail mail.)

 

Thanks for your continued dedication to producing JOTW. I recommend it to anyone who wants to see what’s going on in the communications job market, even if they’re happily employed at the moment. Who knows, there might be an even happier match among the listings. (The alternative selection writer-comedian job #56 looks kind of interesting, doesn’t it?)

 

Cheers,

 

Susan

 

Susan H. Burnell, APR

Imagination Ink – Business Writing & Public Relations

Houston, TX

 

***  Singapore:

 

I really like Singapore.  It’s neat, clean and safe.  It’s Asian and exotic with out the smells of smoke and sewage.  It reminds me of Hawaii.  In fact, Singapore is about half the size of Oahu in land area, and has more than five times as many people, almost 5.2 million.

 

***  It’s hard to explain what happens when an aircraft goes into a stall.  This shows you.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=c32_1367332518

 

*** From the American Hiking Society:

 

Hiking 101: Stay safe in the sun

While most of us enjoy warm, sunny days, we also need to be careful about the time we spend in the sun. Roughly 20% of Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime but there are many things each of us can do to help prevent this.

When enjoying a sunny hike, be sure to:

•             Limit time in the midday sun;

•             Use SPF15 or higher sunscreen; apply 15 minutes before going outside;

•             Wear a hat and cover up;

•             Wear sunglasses that block UV rays; and

•             Be aware of your local UV index.

For more information on sun safety visit the Environmental Protection Agency’s page about being Sun Wise.

 

http://www2.epa.gov/sunwise

 

***  20 Best Hotel Pools Around the World

 

This pops up every few years…but there are some new ones on this list:

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/20-best-hotel-pools-in-the-world?ref=news_fd_051113

 

***  CampMor’s OUTDOOR SOCKS 101

http://outdoors.campmor.com/outdoor-socks-101/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=TrailMail-April262013&cm_pla=51330

 

***  I’ll be looking for the Singapore Dragon Boat Regatta, which starts this wekend in Marina Bay.

 

DBS MARINA REGATTA – DRAGON BOAT RACES

 

18 & 19 May

 

Expect lots of action in the waters as close to 140 international and local teams, including the national teams from Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines and Singapore, paddle it out.

 

The 200m races will be held on 18 May and 500m races on 19 May. The overall winners of the eight categories will walk away with SGD 195,000 in total cash prizes, the highest prize monies for a dragon boat race!

 

Also, don’t forget to check out the Cosplay Festival and Drum Challenge at the Regatta Village between races as you soak in the atmosphere and join in the fun along the Waterfront Promenade!

 

http://www.dbsmarinaregatta.com/index.html

 

***  I was going to send you this newsletter just before I left Singapore on Sunday, but my visit to the Dragon Kiln couldn’t be shared in enough detail, so I have put that off until next issue.  I’ll send you the May issue today.

 

***  I attended “Fight Comic” at The Basement on the campus of Singapore Management University on May 17th with Phillip Raskin and GF Kim.

 

http://www.meetup.com/Singapore-Fun-Events/events/119104702/

http://www.timeoutsingapore.com/performance/comedy/fight-comic

 

***  National Trails Day

 

On June 1st, thousands of outdoor recreation activities are happening in every US State.  So don your favorite pair of boots, grab some friends and hit the trail.  Events include hikes, bike rides, paddling trips, horseback rides, stewardship projects and more.

 

http://www.americanhiking.org/ntd-events/

 

***  Just in time for summer: New airline fees that will make you hot

 

By Michelle Singletary

 

It’s not even summertime, but you may get hot and bothered by a slew of new airline fees.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/just-in-time-for-summer-new-airline-fees-that-will-make-you-hot/2013/05/16/0f51f052-bd97-11e2-97d4-a479289a31f9_story.html

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: May 2013

Virginia’s Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail

By Laura Stark

“The trail brings a lot of economic benefit to the town — [Tourists] come to do the Creeper, then come in to do other things in town.”

Bicycling 68 miles in a day would be an accomplishment for most people. But doing it nearly every day is a testament to endurance and willpower. At 81 years of age, it seems an impossibility. Meet Lawrence the Legend. On any day of the week, you’re likely to see Lawrence Dye, a slender man with big glasses, pedaling along the Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail on a bike that he says has been “a great friend.” Often dressed in bright yellow, Dye is hard to miss. He’s traveled the trail’s length—34 miles—roundtrip several times a week for more than 20 years, racking up over 175,000 miles.

 

“The trail is a huge part of Lawrence’s life,” says Beth Merz, area ranger for Mount Rogers National Recreation Area, a portion of which the trail runs through. “He’s one of those folks that actually goes up the mountain.”

 

The mountain Merz is referring to is Whitetop, part of the Blue Ridge range in southwestern Virginia. At nearly 3,600 feet, it’s the high point of the Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail and is thought to be the genesis of the Virginia Creeper nickname for the railroad, because the trains had to creep up the slope. The moniker was also a nod to the vine of the same name prevalent in the region.

 

“The train climbed up the shoulder of Whitetop Mountain,” says Wayne Miller, president of the Virginia Creeper Trail Club. “There are stories about its slowness. As it climbed up that steep grade, you could almost get out and walk alongside it.”

 

To avoid the challenging climb, many visitors to the rail-trail park at Damascus, a lower point on the trail, ferry their bicycles on a shuttle up to Whitetop Station (a replica depot and visitor center) and coast back down to their cars. The trail continues on to Abingdon, but this 17-mile eastern leg, managed by the U.S. Forest Service, is one of its most popular sections.

 

“I think the main reason they come in the numbers that they do is because it’s pretty simple,” says Kevin Costello, director of tourism for the Abingdon Convention and Visitors Bureau. “There are eight outfitters to choose from that take visitors up to Whitetop. It’s the user-friendliness that makes it so popular.”

 

The Virginia Creeper – officially Norfolk & Western (N&W) Railway – extracted resources, primarily lumber, out of the region in the early 1900s. It also carried iron ore, passengers, and mail. Three miles west of Whitetop lies a remnant of this railroad era.

 

“Green Cove is the real deal,” says Merz. “It’s the oldest station on the trail and was the center of the community. Green Cove Station was a post office, general store, and cargo location. There are artifacts on display — like the original mail boxes — and it frequently features photography exhibits or live music from local groups. It’s quite an attraction.”

 

The trail is heavily used from Memorial Day to Labor Day, but the variety of leafy trees along it — maple, birch, oak, beech, and poplars — wow visitors in the fall and push the trail’s peak usage to October.

 

At its midpoint is Damascus, aptly nicknamed “Trail Town, USA” for its convergence of several trails, including the Creeper. The famed Appalachian Trail, stretching more than 2,000 miles from Georgia to Maine, runs down Main Street. Last year, Budget Travel named it one of the “Coolest Small Towns in America,” specifically citing the community’s welcoming trail culture.

 

“Damascus is a little mill town that was saved by the trail,” says Miller. “It was on its last legs. The old industries were shutting down. Now it supports eight bike shops that service the trail.”

 

This month, the town of less than a thousand is about to get a whole lot bigger. Trail Days is coming, and with it a twentyfold increase in the town’s population.

 

“Trail Days is centered around the Appalachian Trail,” says Aaron Sizemore, Damascus town manager. “Lots of catching up goes on during Trail Days. It’s a reunion for hikers past and present. The first part of week, they trickle in. By Wednesday, they’re coming from out of town, bringing tents, and the town is packed; around 20,000 come.”

 

This time of year is also one of the prettiest. “In the spring, you’ll see mountain laurel and rhododendron blooming along the trail,” says Merz. “Down below trestle number 21, you’re just riding through white and pink beds. The mountain laurels are thick along there.”

 

There are so many trestles along the route that each is numbered with an identifying plaque at either end of the bridge. Originally, there were more than 100 along the railroad over the region’s web of picturesque creeks and rivers; 47 trestles remain on the rail-trail today. Some are quite short, less than 100 feet long, but the longest are more than 600 feet.

 

In contrast to its heavily wooded eastern end, the section between Damascus and Abingdon is much more open and pastoral. Here, the trail flattens out, breaking from the wilderness into farmland and more populated areas.

 

Long ago, Abingdon was known by a different name. The story goes that when famous frontiersman Daniel Boone hunted here in the fall of 1760, a pack of wolves came out of their lair and attacked his dogs. He named the area Wolf Hills, which stuck until Black’s Fort was built in 1774. Today, Costello calls Abington “a touristy town” and rightly so; the town is rich with attractions, including Barter Theater, one of the longest running theaters in the country; Martha Washington Inn, a women’s college in the 1850s and later a Civil War hospital; and a 20-block historic district.

 

Mollie, an N&W steam engine dating back to 1907, sits adjacent to the Creeper trailhead on a small band of track. Her smaller-than-standard size made her more nimble for the railroad’s steep terrain, sharp curves, and wooden trestles that couldn’t support a heavier engine’s weight. And the work of O. Winston Link, who captured classic images of the N&W trains in the 1950s, is on display in the Abingdon station. One of the biggest draws is the rail-trail itself, which ends just south of Main Street near the center of town.

 

“The trail brings a lot of economic benefit to the town,” says Kevin Worley, director of Abingdon’s parks and recreation department. “We average 250,000 annually using the trail. It’s a popular destination point. They come to do the Creeper, then come in to do other things in town.”

 

The trail is also the catalyst for a new way of thinking. “We have a new urban pathway project to connect sidewalks and create linkages that steer more people to the trail,” says Costello. “People are embracing being able to ride a bike more often. The trail has inspired that type of philosophy in town.”

 

But it wasn’t always this beloved. When it was first suggested that a trail be built in the railroad’s place, adjacent landowners put up a fight. It was 1977, the year the trains stopped running. Inspired by the burgeoning rail-trail movement, Dave Brillhart and French Moore, Jr., members of the Washington County Planning Commission at the time, proposed the idea.

 

“When word got out that we were wanting to make a trail out of it, well, all these people that lived out there, they were just furious with me and anybody who talked about it,” recalls Moore in a 2009 interview. “They were so mad about it.”

 

At first, opponents put baled hay, downed trees, and locked gates across the trail to block its use. One of its trestles was even burned.

 

“People thought: ‘We don’t want trashy people in our backyard,'” says Miller. “Once the trail was declared nonmotorized, they realized that responsible people were using it and the trail could bring in sustainable tourism. Slowly people came around.”

 

“The trail is our economic engine,” says Sizemore. “It’s the biggest one we’ve got. It’s the thing that keeps us going.”

 

Many regional events, which boost tourism in the area, feature trail activities. Coming up in early August, the weeklong Virginia Highlands Festival, celebrating Appalachian arts and crafts, offers a chance to meet the soft-spoken and beloved local celebrity Lawrence Dye in the annual Ride with the Legend outing on the Virginia Creeper Trail.

 

When asked what his favorite part of the trail is, Dye responds, “I love all of it. The trail is just a beautiful place to be.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Nicodemus Wilderness Project , Help Save Our Environment & Wildlife, SIOUX FALLS,  SD

http://www.volunteermatch.org/search/opp316870.jsp

 

2.)  Volunteering with Adventure program, Plan My Volunteering PVN Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal

 

Volunteering with Adventure program

 

2 weeks PVN-Nepal Adventure program

1st Day     –     Arrival – Welcome dinner.

2nd Day     –     Language Training + Sightseeing.

3rd Day     –     Language Training + Sightseeing + Family stay information.

4th Day     –     Staying with local family and volunteering.

5th to 10th Day –     Volunteering on the project, staying at a local host family.

11th Day     –     Go to Chitwan Jungle safari

12th Day     –     Chitwan National Park Activities.

13th Day     –     Traveling back Kathmandu and report writing.

Final Day     –     Feedback and good bye dinner.

 

 

4 weeks PVN- Nepal Volunteer program

1st Day     –     Arrival – Welcome dinner.

2nd to 4th Day     –     Language training, Staying at hotel and family.

5th to 20th Day     –     Volunteering on the project, Staying at a local host family.

21st to 24th Day     –     go to Chitwan Jungle safari Activities.

25th to 26th Day     –     Rafting, Camping at the Beach.

27th to 28th Day     –     Reternback to kathmandu.

Final Day     –             Feedback and good bye Dinner.

 

 

6 weeks  PVN-Nepal Volunteer program

1st Day     –     Arrival – Welcome dinner.

2nd to 6th Day     –     Language training, Staying at hotel and family.

7th to 28th Day     –     Volunteering on the project, Staying at a local host Family.

29th to 32nd Day     –     Chitwan National Park Activities.

33rd to 38th Day     –     Trekking – Staying at Tea house.

39th to 40th Day     –     Rafting – Camping at the Beach.

41st to 43rd Day     –     Traveling Back to kathmandu.

Final Day     –     Feedback and good bye dinner.

 

 

8 weeks PVN- Nepal Volunteer program

1st Day     –     Arrival – Welcome dinner.

2nd to 7th Day     –     Language training, Staying at Hotel and Family.

8th to 35th Day     –     Volunteering on the project, Staying at a local host Family.

36th to 40th Day     –     Chitwan National Park Activities.

41st to 48th Day     –     Trekking, Staying at Tea house.

50th to 52nd Day     –     Rafting, Camping at the beach.

53rd to 56th Day     –     Traveling up and down.

57th to 58th Day     –     Free day….

Final Day     –     Feedback and good bye party.

 

To know more about the Program please contact us info@pvnnepal.org

 

http://www.pvnnepal.org/page.php?id=87&page=Adventure Program

 

3.)  Excavating Another Dinosaur, Williams Spring Archeological Dig,  Passport in Time Program, Medicine Bow-Routt NF, near Newcastle, SD

 

Volunteer with archeological digs or historic restoration projects!

 

Medicine Bow-Routt NF

 

New! Excavating Another Dinosaur!

 

WY-4162

July 15-20, 2013 (including weekend)

 

Must commit to entire session

 

Another dinosaur, you say?! Well, same dinosaur we found in 2009, but join us this summer as we give the fossil a new home! Our project will entail removal of the second Triceratops we located during the 2009 survey in the Alkali Creek Paleontological Special Interest Area. We will exhume the dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation, using proven paleontological excavation techniques. Volunteers will remove matrix with shovels, pick axes, rock hammers, tooth brushes, and so on, and will then document and collect loose skeletal pieces. We’ll then apply plaster and burlap to remove the fossil for transport to and long-term curation at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology (SDSM&T) Museum of Geology in Rapid City. We may also have time to collect micro-vertebrate sites while we work on the dino fossil. This project should be another fun and interesting one, so we hope you’ll join us in July!

 

Number of openings: 15

 

Special skills: Must be physically capable of bending, sitting, standing, and/or kneeling for long periods each day, and in a variety of weather conditions (mostly hot!); previous excavation, pedestrian survey, fossil identification, and/or paleontological experience helpful, but not required

 

Minimum age: 15 years old, under 18 with a responsible adult

 

Facilities: Dispersed tent or RV camping in remote area of Thunder Basin NG; base camp tent with cook stoves, pots/pans, utensils; chemical toilets, hot water showers, water for drinking and cooking; optional caterer ($25/day for participants interested); volunteers responsible for personal camping equipment, food (if not opting for catering), and transportation

 

Nearest towns: Newcastle, 38 miles

 

Applications due: May 20, 2013

http://www.passportintime.com/

 

4.)  Wilderness Ranger (BWCAW),  Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, Ely, MN

 

Volunteers will be working with our Wilderness Rangers within the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW). Four duty stations are availabe: Cook, Ely, Grand Marias, and Tofte and each of these offices are taking applications.

 

The BWCAW is approximately 1 million acres that borders Canada. Travel within this wilderness is done mainly by canoe and portages (trails) are utilized to go from one lake to the next. This particular program begins in the first part of June and ends usually in mid to late August. The ending date is flexible, but we do prefer a commitment of 2-3 months. Free lodging is available in our newly constructed dorm style housing units and has most of your basic amenities. A subsistence reimbursement is also given to those that are accepted.

 

The first week in June is dedicated to training. Some of this training includes: crosscut saw use, basic trail and backcountry campsite maintenance, First Aid/CPR, canoe and watercraft operation, and proper use and care of hand tools. The main tools that we use are: crosscut saws, pulaskis, shovels, nippers, axes, etc. Another useful tool in the evening is a fishing pole.

 

A typical two week schedule consists of 7-8 days and nights camping, canoeing, and working hard within the BWCAW followed by six days off and then back in the woods for another 7-8 days. Our experienced Wilderness Rangers typically work from 7am to 5:30pm while in the BWCAW. Expect to paddle about 8-15 miles a day and portage (carry) your share of camping gear, tools, and canoes across those trails that connects our many lakes. During the work day Wilderness Rangers will be maintaining those backcountry primitive campsites and logging/brushing out those portages as they travel. Sometimes you might stay at the same campsite within the BWCAW and other times you may be camping at different sites on different lakes throughout your 7-8 days. Most of the basic camping gear is supplied by the US Forest Service. This gear includes: tent, sleeping bag, thermarest, stove, pots/pans, fuel, water filter, life jacket, and paddle. This will all be supplied in one Duluth Pack and is yours to utilize for the summer.

 

When the work day is done and you are free to do whatever you like whether it’s fishing for trophy size walleyes and bass, swimming in our pristine lakes, or reading a book as the sun sets. Our volunteers in the past have said this was one of the greatest experiences that they have had. The only regret that you may have is not applying.

 

There are also numerous other volunteer opportunities that is available on the Superior National Forest. Some of the possibilities include but are not limited to: wildlife surveys, GPS/GIS, Adopt a Canoe Route, trail clearing, etc. Contact Steve Cochran for further details.

Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Address:  1393 Hwy 169 Ely, MN 55731

Contact:  Steven Cochran 218-365-7610

Availability:  11/1/2012–10/1/2013

Created:  5/3/2013

Suitability:  Adults

Difficulty:  Strenuous

http://www.volunteer.gov/results.cfm?states=MN

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Sonoma Youth Ecology Corps Crew Leader, Conservation Corps North Bay, Cotati, California

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=421500017

 

***  From Bill Seiberlich:

 

2.)  Outreach & Public Relations Coordinator, Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation, Camp Hill, PA

OVERALL SUMMARY: This position utilizes appropriate tools and strategies to advance our mission, build public awareness, attract project sponsors and partners, and to create an environment of support for our programs.

POSITION ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS
– Strategy Development: Develop and implement media and marketing campaigns and activities to promote awareness, involvement, and loyalty towards PPFF and our programs.
– Coordinate direct mail and communication pieces including-could include design, editing, printing, processing, and mailing.
– Prepare/Write content for and proofread newsletters, brochures, letters and other materials for grammar, style and content.
– Assist with special event planning, sponsor solicitation, organization, and marketing. Serve as primary liaison and coordinator for annual awards banquet.
– Offer presentations to corporate lunch and learns as well as to tourism, civic and business clubs for promoting PPFF and building of partnerships.
– Work to promote PPFF and our mission through social media and our website.
– Work with the Board of Directors to assist in their outreach and fundraising endeavors
– Assist in implementing the overall PPFF development and strategic plan.
– Develop and maintain wide list of media contacts and respond to media calls in timely manner.
– Perform grant research.

Financial: Rate of $16.50-$17.00/hr; 28-30 hours per week. Benefits:
Flex time, Simple IRA after one year employment, vacation after one year employment.

POSITION ESSENTIAL REQUIREMENTS
– Ability to think creatively, generate new ideas, develop strategies and follow through.
– Ability to meet deadlines and balance multiple projects; ability to work within budget.
– Superb written & verbal skills; able to work successfully in team environment and in small office setting. Strong organizational, administrative, time management and interpersonal skills.
– Commitment to the mission of the Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation
– Publisher, PowerPoint, Excel, social media required; web design experience preferred.
– Ability to work Saturdays and evenings as necessary; travel required.
– Ability to withstand long periods of sitting, extensive computer work; lifting up to 25 lbs.
– BA or BS in public relations, communications, marketing, or equivalent experience.

Contact: Send resume and writing sample by May 17th, to Marci Mowery,
Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation (www.PaParksAndForests.org), 1845 Market Street, Suite 202, Camp Hill, PA 17011 or ppffnewsletter@pa.net.

 

***  From mark Sofman

 

3.)  Kayaking & Snorkeling Guide, La Jolla Sea Cave Kayaks, La Jolla, CA

http://bit.ly/ZPSdSV

 

4.)  Event Intern- US Open of Surfing (Summer 2013), IMG, Los Angeles, CA

http://bit.ly/ZPTaKY

 

5.)  Paddleboard Instructor, SUP Iowa, Inc, Okoboji, IA

http://bit.ly/ZPSK7l

 

6.)  Alligator/Zebra Handler and Photographer, Wild Florida, Saint Cloud, FL

http://bit.ly/ZPTtFt

 

7.)  Boat Washer/Dock Master, Freedom Boat Club, Palmetto, FL

http://cb.com/ZPUttf

 

8.)  Director of Education, Audubon Canyon Ranch, Glen Ellen, California

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=25917

 

***  Also from Bill Seiberlich:

 

9.)  Administrative Assistant, Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation, Philadelphia, PA

Organization: The Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation
(GPTMC) is a private, non-profit organization that promotes leisure
travel to Philadelphia and The Countryside®. GPTMC builds the regions
economy and image through destination marketing that increases the
number of visitors, the number of nights they stay and the number of
things they do. These efforts enhance the quality of life and sense of
pride for residents. For more information regarding GPTMC, please go to
http://www.visitphilly.com/about/.

Position: A pivotal, primarily administrative position in GPTMCs
Communications Department, the Administrative Assistant keeps the
department running smoothly, working directly with the VP of
Communications on the VPs scheduling and department meeting scheduling;
meeting, event and media distribution support and accounting.
The primary areas of responsibility for this position are as follows:

Communications Assistance
– Manage calendar for VP of Communications, as well as all departmental
meetings and internal events
– Track and keep up-to-date Communications Department calendar of
external meetings
– Process, file and save invoices, AMEX statements, cash
reimbursements
– Write up Payment Authorization Forms (PAFs) for all invoices
– Assist in organizing VPs work-related travel
– Take charge of coordinating logistics for all internal and external
departmental meetings
– Track and distribute all media subscriptions and team memberships
– Assist in supporting and, in some cases, working at events (e.g.,
GPTMC press conferences, July 4th and New Years Week press conferences
and events, Made in America media tie-in events, sports/playoffs media
opportunities, both GPTMC annual events, Philly 360 annual event, events
in key feeder markets, etc.)
– Create presentations for monthly all-staff meetings representing the
Communications Department output
– Set up monthly budget meetings
– Actively participate in all department and staff meetings
– Provide project assistance to directors in the Communications
Department: content development, material preparation, and
PowerPoint/video/collateral coordination, correspondence and
coordination for related conferences, meetings, and presentations.
– Manage any special projects assigned by the VP

Media Assistance
– Work with Media Analyst to learn and support our media monitoring,
distribution and reporting efforts, becoming proficient and able to
stand in when necessary for the MA to produce daily, monthly and special
media coverage reports
– Pull targeted media lists as needed, working with Media Analyst
– Distribute press releases to customized Cision database and special
email lists
– Gain/develop in-depth knowledge of the destination, particularly the
areas of emphasis for GPTMC, our media news room, and our content
assets, including photography and video
– Reply to media inquiries and redirect as appropriate
– Assist in execution of selected visiting journalist program (VJP)
trips as determined by director of media relations and director of
communications
– Be an active member our corporate communications team, providing
perspective and input on all aspects of the work we do to promote
Philadelphia as a destination.

Qualifications
– At least one year of administrative experience, preferably in a
communications department
– Experience multi-tasking, creating and managing Outlook calendars,
planning and arranging all aspects of meetings
– Strong computer experience/skill, including functional knowledge of
Word, databases such as Excel and PowerPoint for creating presentations
and reports
– Ability to organize and retrieve complex information, such as media
lists, that are tools for the department
– Good budgetary skills
– Strong organization skills and attention to detail
– Responsible, flexible, proactive and interested in learning
– Knowledge of and passion for the city and the five-county
Philadelphia region
– Strong communications skills
– Sensitive to confidential information; not willing to engage in rumor
or innuendo
– Ability to establish priorities and meet deadlines

Education Requirements: Bachelors degree

GPTMC is an Equal Opportunity Employer that encourages candidates of
all backgrounds to apply for this position.

Contact: Please send a cover letter, resume and salary requirements
to: jobs@gptmc.com. Thank you for your interest.

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for March 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for March 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.”

-R. Buckminster Fuller

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 591 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Heather Murphy:  Keep on Truckee’ing

***  Most U.S. Flights Are on Smaller Jets; Tight Squeezes and ‘the Right Amount of Misery’

***  Regulations and Permits on the AT

***  Uncomfortable seats, bag fees rank high among air travelers’ dislikes

***  How to Climb Katahdin

***  Does Southwest really save you money?

***  Hiking Food:

***  Ribbon of Blue – The Connecticut River then and now

***  America’s State Parks

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: February 2013
California’s Truckee River Bike Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Experienced sea kayakers, AMC Staff at Knubble Bay Camp, Georgetown Maine

2.)  Tour Guide Manager, Grand Circle Corporation, Boston, MA

3.)  Director of Development and Communications, National Ability Center, Park City, Utah

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Associate Director of Corporate Practices Communications, The Nature Conservancy, Washington, DC

2.)  Director of Marketing, International Expeditions, Birmingham, AL

3.)  Pass Programs Manager, Colorado Ski Country USA, Denver, CO

4.)  Guide, Raft Masters, Canon City, Colorado

5.)  EVENT STAFF, Glacier Park, Inc., Columbia Falls, MT 59912

6.)  Publisher, National Wildlife Federation, Reston, VA

7.)   Marketing Manager/ Writer, National Recreation and Park Association, Ashburn, VA

8.)  Communications and Media Coordinator, Management Assistance Team, National Conservation Leadership Institute, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, Shepherdstown, WV

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Heather Murphy:  Keep on Truckee’ing

 

Ned,

 

I enjoyed the latest Your Very Next Step, especially the segment on the National Rail-Trail of the month: California’s Truckee River Bike Trail by Laura Stark.  I was lucky enough to be on a trip to the greater Lake Tahoe area in fall 2010.  This was in the shoulder season — after peak summer and before the winter snows.  There were many trails to explore and the crowds were thin.

 

We made it up to Truckee and were lucky enough to have a fabulous breakfast at the Squeeze In.  It is a tiny place at 10060 Donner Pass Road in Truckee that purports to serve “The Best Omelettes on the Planet.”  That  assessment is entirely accurate with bonus points for excellence beyond any omelet I’ve eaten.  I should add that Squeeze In has been featured on a Bobby Flay Throwdown.  Every single thing about the restaurant was exceptional — from the collection of kitsch and stickers on the wall to the amazing food.  My squeeze ordered a side biscuit with sausage gravy — I took a sample.  I’m not really a biscuits and gravy person but the Squeeze In’s was nearly a religious experience…and who doesn’t need a little religion?  (http://www.squeezein.com)

 

Truckee also has a variety of quaint shops.  One of my favorites was Ambiance Home Comforts, owned by Bill & Mary Kay Benner (10156 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA  96161 — TOLL FREE (866)401-4440).  This shop stocked a variety of candles and Christmas ornaments and other gift items.  I happened to open the lid of a candle that smelled exactly like the name:  Balsam & Cedar.  Trying to travel light, I did not buy one.  Months later, I called the shop and Bill & Mary Kay knew exactly what I was talking about, shipped the candle and made it possible to enjoy an aromatic reminder of the stop in Truckee.

 

Cheers, Ned.  Thanks for an enjoyable trip down memory lane.

 

Heather Murphy

 

***  Most U.S. Flights Are on Smaller Jets; Tight Squeezes and ‘the Right Amount of Misery’

 

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323478304578330293636960034.html

 

***  Regulations and Permits on the AT

 

http://www.appalachiantrail.org/hiking/hiking-basics/regulations-permits

 

***  Uncomfortable seats, bag fees rank high among air travelers’ dislikes

 

http://www.usatoday.com/story/todayinthesky/2013/02/26/poll-fliers-most-annoyed-by-tight-seats-bag-fees/1948891/

 

***  How to Climb Katahdin

 

Planning a trip to Baxter State Park to hike the focal point of the destination, Katahdin, can be a task heavier than one’s backpack. Carey Kish, editor of the Maine Mountain Guide, explains ways to plan ahead and prepare—including camping, hiking trails, and safety—that will jump-start a successful trip to Maine’s highest summit.

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/web/how-to-climb-katahdin.cfm

 

***  Does Southwest really save you money?

 

Study Challenges Southwest’s Low-Fare Image

 

By Jay Boehmer

 

http://www.businesstravelnews.com/Business-Travel/Study-Challenges-Southwest-s-Low-Fare-Image/?ida=Airlines&a=proc&cid=eltrDaily

 

***  Hiking Food:

 

For short hikes, food is more of a nice to have rather than a necessity. But, on long hikes, an adequate food supply is critical to success and safety.

 

http://hikingdude.com/hiking-food.php

 

***  Ribbon of Blue

 

The Connecticut River then and now

 

By Michael Tougias

 

AMC Outdoors, March/April 2013

 

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/2013/features/paddling-the-connecticut-river.cfm

 

***  AMERICA’S FIRST BLUEWAY

 

Establishing the Connecticut River Watershed as a National Blueway will help promote access to the rivers and trails in the watershed for outdoor recreation, conservation of wildlife habitat and working lands, and support travel, tourism and outdoor recreation economies throughout the watershed.

 

http://www.outdoors.org/about/newsroom/press/2012/first-national-blueway.cfm

 

***  America’s State Parks

 

America’s State Parks helps capture the collective strength and importance of the great park systems developed in the 50 states. With over 7,000 units and more than 720 million visits, America’s State Parks works to enhance the American quality of life. NASPD board members representing each region of the country initially governed the America’s State Parks alliance.

 

http://www.americasstateparks.org/About

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: March 2013
New Hampshire’s Northern Rail Trail
By Laura Stark

Daniel Webster, the famed orator and New Hampshire native, was a featured speaker at the 1847 ribbon cutting for Boston and Maine Railroad’s Northern Line. At the ceremony in Lebanon, before a crowd of more than a thousand, he said of the railroad, “It is the spirit and influence of free labor, it is the indomitable industry of a free people, that has done all this.”

The same could be said of today’s Northern Rail Trail, which begins just steps away from where Webster gave that keynote address and follows the same path as the railway once did. It was built by the hard and loving labor of hundreds of volunteers and is now the longest rail-trail in the state, spanning 52 miles.

“This is one of the best examples in this region of a trail that’s being developed at the grassroots level,” says Carl Knoch, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy’s (RTC) manager of trail development in the Northeast.

Although the corridor was purchased by the state when the railroad abandoned the line in 1996, the trail’s development has been fervently pursued at the local level. “It probably has the greatest number of groups involved in trying to develop it as a trail,” says Chris Gamache, Chief Supervisor for the New Hampshire Bureau of Trails, which oversees the trail. “There are lots of groups working together to the same end goal.” It was for this reason that the Northern Rail Trail was featured in RTC’s 2012 Community Built report, highlighting exceptional local efforts across America of citizens and volunteers using community strength to build and maintain public pathways.

Shortly after the trail was turned over to the state, snowmobile groups saw the potential of the corridor for recreational use and began to work on it. “The snowmobile clubs were the original maintainers of the trail,” Gamache says. Volunteers from the Andover Snowmobile Club, Lakes Region Snowmobile Club, Town Line Trail Dusters and others removed railroad ties, redecked bridges (the trail has more than a dozen), trimmed trees and completed other tasks to make the trail safe and operational.

To address the needs of the trail during the warmer months, two nonprofit groups were formed, one in each of the two counties that the trail traversed.

“Our work was relatively low cost because much of the trail did not have heavy ballast on it,” says Dick Mackay, chair of the Friends of the Northern Rail Trail in Grafton County that manages the trail’s northern end. “We didn’t have all this broken stone. We had cinder, a black, grainy material that’s soft and resilient. It’s actually one of the best possible surfaces. When the ties were pulled out, we had a trail!”

Volunteers at the southern half of the trail did not have it so easy. “The railroad construction in the two counties was dramatically different,” says Alex Bernhard, vice president of Friends of the Northern Rail Trail in Merrimack County. “The railroad upgraded the southern half by laying heavy stone ballast. It has great drainage and is stable for the ties. But when you take up the ties it’s impossible to walk on or ride a bike on for any length of time and you can’t ride a horse on it either.”

The Merrimack County group has spent much of its budget (largely provided by Transportation Enhancements and Recreational Trails Program grants) purchasing, trucking and laying down a custom-designed stone dust over the rocky ballast. Without this special mixture, the trail would only be useable in the winter when heavy snowfalls cover the uneven surface. Another project has been the careful restoration of the granite mileposts lining this section of trail, lingering relics of the corridor’s past. Used by train engineers, the numbers on the posts indicate the distance from either B (Boston) or WRJ (White River Junction).

When track construction was attempted through Enfield, the railroad had an unexpected fight on its hands. Although the conservative Shaker community in town did not want the gleaming modern trains within sight of their quiet enclave (a place so beautiful they called it the “Chosen Vale”), they recognized the value of a readily accessible means of exporting their wares. So a deal was struck: in return for an investment in the railroad venture, the tracks were moved away from the Shaker village to the other side of Mascoma Lake. One of the railroad’s locomotives was even dubbed “The Shaker.” Less than a mile from the trail, the Enfield Shaker Museum offers an intriguing place to learn about the Shakers that settled here in 1793 and practiced equality, celibacy, pacifism and communal property ownership.

Further south, in Andover, history buffs will not want to miss a stop at Potter Place, a Victorian rail station maintained by the Andover Historical Society. Inside, the feeling of a busy train depot in the early to mid-1900s is carefully preserved. An adjacent caboose can be explored. Across from the station lies the homestead and gravesite of Richard Potter, a magician and ventriloquist who broke new ground as an African-American performer throughout the country in the early 19th century. Another notable stop is Franklin, where you can visit Daniel Webster’s birthplace, as well as nearby Webster Lake, where he spent many summers.

For those interested in nature, the trail does not disappoint. New Hampshire had been vying to be the most-forested state in the lower 48, and recently nabbed the title over Maine, its longtime rival. Nearly 89 percent of the Granite State is forested, including the area through which the trail runs. If you’re looking to see moose south of Alaska, Tewksbury Pond and the surrounding marshlands between Canaan and Grafton is a place they frequent. The occasional bear can be found here, too, as well as eagles, herons, and a flock of wild turkeys in Canaan.

With its increasing year-round popularity, there are movements afoot to expand the trail from both ends. In the north, fundraising is underway to begin construction on the Mascoma River Greenway that would seamlessly extend the Northern Rail Trail four miles closer to the Connecticut River along the state’s border with Vermont.

A hoped-for trail terminus is White River Junction, Vt., where the Northern Railroad originally ended. From the rail-trail’s southern end, plans are to extend the trail from Boscawen to Concord by summer 2015. This would provide easy access to and from the state capital and I-93, a major thoroughfare.

“The comment we always get about the trail is, ‘This was here and we didn’t even know it!” says Mackay. “They’re stunned that there could be such a wonderful place to walk or bike so close to home.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Experienced sea kayakers, AMC Staff at Knubble Bay Camp, Georgetown Maine

 

Knubble Bay Camp in Georgetown Maine is looking for experienced sea kayakers to join their committee and help guide AMC members on excursions from the camp. The camp is run by a committee of volunteers since 1979 and regularly provides training to club members who want to learn how to sea kayak. Potential candidates should posses good communication skills, group leadership experience, and a willingness to support the mission.

http://activities.outdoors.org/search/index.cfm/action/details/id/23790

 

2.)  Tour Guide Manager, Grand Circle Corporation, Boston, MA

http://www.linkedin.com/jobs?viewJob=&jobId=4893884

 

3.)  Director of Development and Communications, National Ability Center, Park City, Utah

http://www.idealist.org/view/job/MT9htXKMn3H4/

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

1.)  Associate Director of Corporate Practices Communications, The Nature Conservancy, Washington, DC

http://bit.ly/12s3jys

 

2.)  Director of Marketing, International Expeditions, Birmingham, AL

http://www.linkedin.com/jobs?viewJob=&jobId=4895241

 

***  From Andrew Hudson’s Job List:

 

3.)  Pass Programs Manager, Colorado Ski Country USA, Denver, CO

http://andrewhudsonsjobslist.com/index.cfm?PID=805&ID=8788,30012,0&#j8

 

4.)  Guide, Raft Masters, Canon City, Colorado

http://raftmasters.com/guide-training.php

 

5.)  EVENT STAFF, Glacier Park, Inc., Columbia Falls, MT 59912

https://external-glacierpark-viad.icims.com/jobs/2446/job

 

6.)  Publisher, National Wildlife Federation, Reston, VA

http://jobview.monster.com/GetJob.aspx?JobID=120291232

 

7.)   Marketing Manager/ Writer, National Recreation and Park Association, Ashburn, VA

 

The National Recreation & Park Association is actively seeking a team player with strong writing skillsto join our team as a Marketing Manager. This role will be responsible to manage several marketing projects but will also serve as the point person to craft messages to our members that will motivate them to take action. This position will entail editing the content from other departments as well as developing new content for a wide range of multimedia channels (web, email, social, mobile, video, etc.) copy for emails, publications and the web. Specific experience in an individual membership organization, marketing products and services to members is highly desirable.

 

Summary:

•Create innovative and effective messages that compel members to engage, renew, donate, volunteer or take another actionfor a variety of media platforms including email campaigns, online and mobile experiences, and social applications.

•Manage the process and deliverable for several short term and long term marketing projects.

•Display agility in balancing short-notice requests with longer-term projects.

•Ensure that projects are delivered in keeping with established campaign schedules.

•Proactively gather resource material and conduct cursory research for campaign development and strategy.

•Consult and partner with staff, clients and members in a collaborative effort to ensure the highest quality of the associations creative work.

•Stay current with advances in consumer media consumption habits, techniques, emerging technologies and tactics.

 

DISCOVER the BENEFITS at NRPA!

 

Conveniently located off the Dulles Greenway, in Brambleton Regional Park in Ashburn, NRPA boasts a warm professional environment, with a relaxing and peaceful view of nature at its finest! All staff have access to indoor & outdoor eating areas, as well as indoor & outdoor fitness opportunities. Our facility has a brand new air-conditioned fitness room with access to showers, as well as foot trails for the outdoor enthusiast. Full time staff enjoy a very rich benefit package that includes group Health, Dental, and Vision for employee and family, paid 80% by the employer;403(b) fully vested upon hire; Life insurance, Short Term Disability and Long Term Disability paid 100% by the employer; accrue 26 Paid days off per year plus 13 paid holidays, eligibility in the first month of employment, Length of Service Awards and much, much more! NRPA is committed to promoting an environment of work-life balance. To promote healthy lifestyles, at work and away, we have established programs like Teleworking, FlexTime Schedules, 37.5 hour work-week, Employee Assistance Programs, Educational Assistance Programs, Lunch-and-Learn sessions and more. Discover what we already know about NRPA … it’s a great place to work!

 

APPLICATION PROCESS

 

Position will remain open until filled. Applicants must apply through NRPA’s Recruitment system to be considered. Also submit resume, salary requirements and salary history. Enter information in the “Notes” section to include a cover letter or list employee referrals.

 

NRPA is an EQUAL OPPORTUNITY employer with a COMMITMENT to DIVERSITY. Women and ethnic minorities ENCOURAGED to apply.

 

Salary Range: $50,000 – $55,000

 

NOTES: Local Residents Preferred (No Relo)

 

Requirements

 

•Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism, English, Marketing Communications, or related discipline preferred

•3-5 years’ experience in conception and execution of email, copywriting, communications field, association experience a plus

•Knowledge of Microsoft Office (Outlook, Excel, Word)

•Experience in creating compelling copy for: email promotions, e-newsletters, online display media, campaign web copy, storyboards and scripts for interactive and viral marketing pieces.

•Knowledge of online and mobile experiences, email campaigns, and social applications, as demonstrated through a robust portfolio.

 

http://asi.careerhq.org/jobs#/detail/5252621

***  From Amanda Myers:

 

Please post the following job in your newsletter. Thank you!

Amanda Myers

Training and Information Services Administrator

Management Assistance Team

National Conservation Leadership Institute

Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

Shepherdstown, WV

amandam@matteam.org

www.matteam.org

www.conservationleadership.org

 

8.)  Communications and Media Coordinator, Management Assistance Team, National Conservation Leadership Institute, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, Shepherdstown, WV

 

The Management Assistance Team located in Shepherdstown, WV, seeks an individual with strong communication and media skills to join the team of five other high performing professionals. Duties include a broad spectrum of communication and multimedia production responsibilities. Excellent written and verbal communication skills as well as working knowledge of MS Office required. Skills in desktop publishing and digital video editing software strongly preferred. Competitive salary based on experience plus benefits. Go to www.matteam.org for a full position description and instructions on how to apply.

 

 

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