Your Very Next Step newsletter for October 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for October 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness.”
John Muir

 

“Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so.”

― Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Any interesting stories while going through security?

***  China report from Bill Ryerson

***  Top 10 Food Festivals You’ve Never Heard Of

***  19 Idiotic (But Real) Travel Complaints

***  Festivals of the world: where to go in November

***  Four Things NOT to Do With Your Passport

***  27 Solid Reasons Why Palm Springs is the Bomb Diggity

***  Roadkill Permits? There Will Be an App for That

***  Fodor’s 100: World’s Best Budget Hotels of 2013

***  Some of the best High Adventure opportunities—including volunteer opportunities and employment—are at Boy Scout High Adventure bases:

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer Opportunities, 2013-2014 winter programs, Outdoors for All Foundation, Seattle WA

2.)  Volunteer position, Evening Lantern Tour at Carriage Hill MetroPark, Five Rivers MetroParks, Dayton, Ohio

3.)  Recreation Services Internship, Outdoors for All Foundation, Seattle WA

 

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Recreation Program Coordinator, Austin Parks and Recreation Department, Austin, Texas

2.)  Director, Outdoor Connections, Five Rivers MetroParks, Dayton, Ohio

3.)  AmeriCorps Leadership and Conservation Corpsmember, Mile High Youth Corps, Denver, Colorado

4.)  AS Outdoor Center Marketing Resources Coordinator 2013-2014, Western Washington University. Bellingham, WA

5.)  Assistant Director of Campus Life and Director of Outdoor Education, Colby College, Waterville, ME

6.)  Center Director, Strawberry Plains Audubon Center, National Audubon Society, Holly Springs, Mississippi

7.)  Berkshire Outdoor Center Assistant Director, YMCA, Becket, MA

8.)  Professional Outdoor Instructor , Bradford Woods Outdoor Center – Martinsville, IN

9.)  Part time Orienteering & Geocaching Instructor – Spring 2014, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

11.)  Communications Technician – Antarctica, GHG Corporation, United States

12.)  Elk Camp Snowcat Operator, Aspen Skiing Company, Aspen, CO

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

 

***  How about you?  Any wardrobe advice for fellow flyers?

Any interesting stories while going through security?

 

Send to Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

***  China report from Bill Ryerson:

 

Hi Ned,

 

I just spoke yesterday at the Climate Change Communications Conference, sponsored by the Yale Climate Change Communications project of the Yale University Forestry School and the China Center for Climate Change Communication. Despite the finger pointing at China for now being the world’s biggest emitter of greenhouse gasses, the country is doing a lot to combat climate change. In some ways, China may be the world’s best hope for innovations to address global warming. There are tree planting initiatives that include giving gifts of trees planted in someone’s honor during events like major birthdays as carbon offsets, and activities by the Environmental Protection Volunteers Association to reduce emissions that make China a beacon for innovations in fighting climate change.

 

I’m not here on tourism, but Beijing has continued to modernize, and the new airport is very efficient and quite beautiful. Population Media Center is here planning a soap opera to reduce demand for ivory by Chinese consumers and to address climate change and other key issues.

 

Best wishes,

Bill

 

***  Top 10 Food Festivals You’ve Never Heard Of

 

Now that the Food Network has profiled everything from chili cook-offs to Gilroy’s Garlic Festival you probably think you’ve seen it all when it comes to food festivals. Well, think again! These 10 festivals are guaranteed fun, and we’ve even included a story from SuccessfulMeetings.com to help you get started planning.

 

1. Biscuit Festival: Knoxville, TN

 

2. Loaf ‘N Jug Chile & Frijoles Festival: Pueblo, CO

 

3. Dudie Burger Festival: Tupelo, MS

 

4. Barbecue Festival: Lexington, NC

 

5. RC and Moonpie Festival: Shelbyville, TN

 

6. Happy Harry’s Rib Fest: Fargo, ND

 

7. Soul Food Cook-Off: Muskogee, OK

 

8. Gingerbread House Festival: Provo, UT

 

9. Oregon Truffle Festival: Eugene, OR

 

10. Tomato Festival: Newark, OH

 

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/Top-10-Food-Festivals-You-ve-Never-Heard-Of/?cid=eltrTop10

 

***  19 Idiotic (But Real) Travel Complaints

 

A trip is supposed to be your time away from the crazy. Remind me never to travel to any of the same vacation spots these people have booked! These are actual complaints received from dissatisfied customers by Thomas Cook Vacations, via the Huffington Post, via Meeting News:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/blogdramedy/idiotic-travel-complaints_b_4073107.html

 

***  Festivals of the world: where to go in November

 

From Lonely Planet’s A Year of Festivals.

 

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/caribbean/travel-tips-and-articles/77491#ixzz2hhAND6nV

 

***  Four Things NOT to Do With Your Passport

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2013/10/18/6039/7129/travel/Four+Things+NOT+to+Do+With+Your+Passport

 

***  27 Solid Reasons Why Palm Springs is the Bomb Diggity

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2012/12/27/35712/263/travel/27+Solid+Reasons+Why+Palm+Springs+is+the+Bomb+Diggity

 

***  Roadkill Permits? There Will Be an App for That

 

By MATT VOLZ Associated Press

http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/roadkill-permits-app-20526348

 

***  Fodor’s 100: World’s Best Budget Hotels of 2013

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/fodors-100-worlds-best-budget-hotels-of-2013?ref=news_fd_101213#!1-intro

 

***  Some of the best High Adventure opportunities—including volunteer opportunities and employment—are at Boy Scout High Adventure bases:

 

Florida National High Adventure Sea Base, Islamorada, FL

http://bsaseabase.org/Resources/Employment.aspx

 

Northern Tier National High Adventure Program, Ely, MN

http://www.ntier.org/

 

Philmont Scout Ranch, Cimarron, NM

 

Each season, Philmont Scout Ranch employs more than 1,000 staff members to operate and support Philmont’s program, Training Center, food service,  ranching museums and maintenance and to assist the administrative staff. A wide variety of paid positions are available, including Rangers, Backcountry Program Counselors and Training Center and base camp support staff.

 

The majority of contracts coincide with the summer season, from late May through mid-August. However, some temporary positions are available that support the spring, fall, and winter programs. All staff members, no matter what their job is or where they work, have a very important role to play in the total success of Philmont.

 

http://www.philmontscoutranch.org/

 

Chilkoot High Adventure Base, Great Alaska Council Boy Scouts of America and the International Wilderness Leadership School, Haines, AK

http://alaskascoutingadventures.org/

 

Teton High Adventure Base, Great Salt Lake Council, Jackson, WY

http://www.gslc-bsa.org/teton-high-adventure-base/27545

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: October 2013

Illinois’ Old Plank Road Trail

By Laura Stark

 

“We knew it was a darn good thing worth putting up the good fight for.”

 

 

Traveling along the tranquil Old Plank Road Trail today, you would never know the site was once the cause of heated debate and a contentious struggle lasting 20 years. The paved 22-mile rail-trail now offers a canopy of oak trees and sugar maples rustling overhead, delicate prairie grasses that stir with the passage of bicyclists, and soft purple wildflowers that peek up through the green underbrush.

 

The dream for this idyllic path in the southern suburbs of Chicago began in the mid-1970s, when the railroad line upon which the trail now rests was formally abandoned. By the end of the decade, locals were already casually using the corridor for nature hikes. The effort to fully convert it to a biking and walking path was championed by the Forest Preserve District of Will County, but as the trail plan took shape in the 1980s, they faced a big hurdle – the public perception of what developing a trail would mean.

 

“At that time, the county was fairly rural,” says Ralph Schultz, director of planning and operations for the district. “There were a lot of misunderstandings about what the trail would be, who it would serve, and what it would cost.”

 

John Joyce remembers feeling the heat at presentations he gave about the project to drum up support. “The townships would have public meetings to involve the public on decisions about the trail,” he says. “Some people hated the trail. They thought people would come into the neighborhood, steal things out of their homes, and go down the trail to make their escape.”

 

Newly arrived from Minnesota, Joyce had become familiar with the emerging trend of rails-to-trails after hearing about Wisconsin’s Elroy-Sparta State Trail that opened in 1967. He worked as director of parks and recreation for Park Forest, one of the communities along the trail, retiring just last year after nearly four decades of service.

 

Though the project had its vocal opponents, support for the trail was steadfastly building. “When the meeting was over and people were filing out, someone who lived along the trail would always come up to speak to you quietly about the project,” recalls Joyce.

 

A united front was created in 1988 when the Old Plank Road Trail Management Commission was formed. Consisting of the city and county governments along the right-of-way, the group still meets regularly on topics affecting the entire trail. Recently, a friends group supporting the rail-trail has formed to assist with trail cleanup and beautification, including adding benches and signage. In recognition of these efforts, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC) is providing financial support to the friends group through its Metropolitan Grants Program, sponsored by The Coca-Cola Foundation.

 

In 1992, the land for the trail was acquired from Penn Central Railroad. And after two decades of planning and perseverance, its first 12 miles—from Park Forest to Hickory Creek Forest Preserve—was completed in 1997. A highlight of the grand opening was a 24-foot-long cake decorated to look like the new trail.

 

Construction continued over the next several years on three more short sections before its planned 22 miles were fully realized. Today, the trail is one of the most widely visited in the state, according to data collected by statewide trail counts conducted last summer by Trails for Illinois in partnership with RTC.

 

“We had a counter on the Old Plank in Frankfort, and it recorded the highest annual use of any trail in Illinois that we surveyed,” says Eric Oberg, trail development manager for RTC’s Midwest
Regional Office. “We looked at a lot of major trail systems in the state, but the Old Plank had the highest annual usage by far: 127,000.” The next most-used trail was the Fox River Trail, with 86,500.

 

Frankfort is the trail’s physical, and spiritual, center. The pathway runs through its historic downtown with many charming shops and restaurants within easy reach. A bustling Sunday farmer’s market offers locally grown produce and homemade baked goods, May through October. And, as one enters town, a beautiful archway emblazoned with the trail’s name curves overhead, a welcoming sight.

 

Oddly, the trail gets its name from something that never was. A wooden boardwalk stretching from Joliet to the Indiana border was planned in 1851, but never came to fruition. It was part of a short-lived transportation craze across the U.S. of wooden toll-roads that at first seemed a vast improvement over the crude dirt pathways of the day. But wood—subject to rot, warpage, and general wear and tear—proved too difficult and expensive to maintain as a roadway, and the trend sputtered out.

 

The corridor was put to better use in 1855, when trains begin running on the newly built Michigan Central Railroad. “They shipped products of agriculture: corn, soybeans, and wheat,” says Bill Molony, president of the Blackhawk Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society. “Even today, it’s a strong agricultural area. By avoiding Chicago, they saved time and expense, so the railroad became known as the Joliet Cutoff.”

 

Though these trains have been replaced by trail traffic, a number of railroads nearby are thriving. In Park Forest, just a stone’s throw from the Old Plank Road Trail, rail fans are salivating over the new Rail Fan Park, where, from a raised observation platform, visitors can see something extraordinary. Here, a rare cloverleaf interchange for trains was needed at the intersection of two major rail routes, one going east-west and the other north-south.

 

“At that location, any train can change to any direction,” says Molony, “It gives more flexibility to their whole system.” Both freight trains and Metra and Amtrak passenger lines currently utilize the tracks.

 

Robert Gunther, director for Park Forest’s recreation and parks department describes Canadian National Railway as “a good neighbor” in helping the community develop the two-acre site, which includes interpretive signage on the railroad industry and history in the area, a bright red 60-year-old caboose, and native vegetation that railroad travelers would have seen from their windows in the late 1800s.

 

“The north-south line is elevated, so it comes around on the loop going down to grade level and crosses under itself,” says Gunther. “It’s interesting to watch the dynamics of the movements.”

 

With beautiful views, an interesting new attraction, and wide community usage and support, what could be next for the trail?

 

“On its western end, Joliet is developing a multi-modal center,” says Schultz. “The Forest Preserve has four different trails that come into Joliet. The center will become ground zero for all of our transportation systems.”

 

The new center—a state-of-the-art hub for rail, intercity buses, community shuttles, cars, bicycles, and pedestrians—will be built adjacent to a building from another era, the grand Joliet Union Station dating back to 1912.

 

“Having such a major trail artery connecting to that center, enhances it as a multi-modal transit facility,” says Oberg. “It opens up the trail for more visitor use because you could get on a train from anywhere and get to Joliet. Joliet could be a launching point for one heck of a bike vacation.”

 

Things are busy at the other end of the trail as well. “There are discussions of taking the trail to Chicago Heights,” says Schultz. If completed, the extension would reach the Thorn Creek Trail and, eventually, connect into the northwestern Indiana and Chicago lakefront trail networks.

 

“The Chicago Heights connection is not long, only a mile or two, but the impact long-term would be huge,” says Oberg.

 

Nearly 40 years since it was first envisioned, the well-loved and growing Old Plank Road Trail has proved its value. “I’m proud of the fact that we stuck with it,” says Joyce. “We knew it was a darn good thing worth putting up the good fight for.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer Opportunities, 2013-2014 winter programs, Outdoors for All Foundation, Seattle WA

http://www.outdoorsforall.org/documents/Programs/Volunteer_guide_web.pdf

 

2.)  Volunteer position, Evening Lantern Tour at Carriage Hill MetroPark, Five Rivers MetroParks, Dayton, Ohio

http://www.metroparks.org/GetInvolved/GetInvolved.aspx

 

3.)  Recreation Services Internship, Outdoors for All Foundation, Seattle WA

http://www.outdoorsforall.org/documents/Employment/Internships_Recreation.pdf

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Recreation Program Coordinator, Austin Parks and Recreation Department, Austin, Texas

http://careercenter.nrpa.org/jobs/#/detail/5741479/

 

2.)  Director, Outdoor Connections, Five Rivers MetroParks, Dayton, Ohio

http://www.metroparks.org/AboutUs/Careers.aspx

 

3.)  AmeriCorps Leadership and Conservation Corpsmember, Mile High Youth Corps, Denver, Colorado

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=399800026

 

4.)  AS Outdoor Center Marketing Resources Coordinator 2013-2014, Western Washington University. Bellingham, WA

https://jobs.wwu.edu/JobPosting.aspx?JPID=4002

 

5.)  Assistant Director of Campus Life and Director of Outdoor Education, Colby College, Waterville, ME

http://www.colby.edu/administration_cs/humanresources/employment/asst_dir_camus_life_dir_outdoor_ed_9_2013.cfm

 

6.)  Center Director, Strawberry Plains Audubon Center, National Audubon Society, Holly Springs, Mississippi

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=395400013

 

7.)  Berkshire Outdoor Center Assistant Director, YMCA, Becket, MA

http://www.ymca.net/career-opportunities/open-positions.html?key=23514

 

8.)  Professional Outdoor Instructor , Bradford Woods Outdoor Center – Martinsville, IN

 

Outdoor Instructors needed for three separate 12-week seasons during the Spring, Summer, and Fall 2014. Bradford Woods is known internationally as Indiana University’s Outdoor Center. We are seeking experienced candidates to run programming for youth and adults. If you are looking for that next step to full-time professional work, then look no further. We offer programs in environmental and adventure education as well as some retreat opportunities. Instructors are cross-trained in these programs. We offer $250/week with meals while working, housing, utilities, Wi-Fi, and fitness center, all on a 2500 acre facility. The full job description as well as application information are posted on our website www.bradwoods.org\employment\field-instructor. Please submit a resume, cover letter, and complete application for consideration. For more information, contact Melanie Wills at mjwills@indiana.edu or phone  765-342-2915 .

 

NOTES: 12 openings.

 

http://careercenter.nrpa.org/jobs/5742044

 

*** From Mark Sofman:

 

9.)  Part time Orienteering & Geocaching Instructor – Spring 2014, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

http://bit.ly/H3lBCL

 

11.)  Communications Technician – Antarctica, GHG Corporation, United States

http://bit.ly/H3mDij

 

12.)  Elk Camp Snowcat Operator, Aspen Skiing Company, Aspen, CO

http://bit.ly/H3lZBm

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
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Your Very Next Step newsletter for September 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for September 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“In wilderness is the preservation of the world.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  National Wildlife Federation Hike & Seek

***  The Top 10 Beach Cities

***  Virginia Cleanup Events:

***  Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup:

***  Meet Rippl

***  Trail Cameras

***  Yeah, there’s a fee for that:

***  10 Best National Parks for Fall Trips

***  Best Geocaching Websites:

***  TSA Expands PreCheck to Sixty Additional Airports

***  Chiggers:

***  RANKED: The Best Airlines In America

***  The Top 10 Ways to Sleep on a Plane

***  10 Perfect Outfits for Long-Haul Flights

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: September 2013

California’s SMART Pathway

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer Opportunities, Rainsong Wildlife Sanctuary, Peninsula Nicoya, Costa Rica

2.)  Conservation Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., Tiburon, CA

3.)  Volunteering Opportunities, Busch Wildlife Sanctuary at Loxahatchee River District, Jupiter, FL

4.)  Husky Ranch Adventure, offered through Fronteering Travel Services Inc., Yukon, Canada

5.)  Volunteer opportunity, Keep our parks beautiful, City of Sacramento Volunteer Program, Sacramento, CA

 

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  SPECIAL EVENTS AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR), Arlington County, Arlington, VA

2.)  Vice President Communications and Public Relations, Travel Portland, Portland, OR

3.)  Media Relations Manager, National Audubon Society, Inc., NY, NY

4.)  Story and Communications Curator, Marine Mammal Center, Sausalito, California

5.)  Tour Guide, Cave of the Mounds, Blue Mounds, WI

6.)  Bear Tracking – Conservation Biology Volunteers, Ecuador, Andean Bear Foundation, United States

7.)  Development Officer, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Cortez, Colorado

8.)  Manager, Science Outreach Full-time, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC or Santa Cruz, CA

9.)  Manager, Digital Outreach and Fundraising, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  National Wildlife Federation Hike & Seek

 

Find one in your area:

 

www.hikeandseek.org

 

Here’s the one near Washington, D.C.

 

Seneca Creek State Park

11950 Clopper Road

Gaithersburg, MD

October 19th

 

* A family-friendly hike through Seneca Creek State Park, Gaithersburg, Maryland

* Hands-on crafts and activities for kids ages 3-10 along the trail

* A scavenger hunt

* Live wildlife displays

* A chance to meet and take pictures with Ranger Rick

* And so much more!

Your youngsters will LOVE the special activities we have in store for them, such as meeting live wildlife, making a take-home butterfly, pressing leaves, hunting for salamanders and more! All especially designed to thrill kids age 3-10; toddlers and their grown-ups.

 

See Hike and Seek volunteer opportunities here:

 

http://www.nwf.org/Hike-And-Seek/Volunteer.aspx

 

***  The Top 10 Beach Cities

 

By Kate Mulcrone

 

National Geographic has pulled together this list of can’t-miss beach towns around the world. We’ve also included some stories to help you plan a meeting in one of these fabulous locales.

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/The-Top-10-Beach-Cities/?cid=eltrTop10

 

***  Virginia Cleanup Events:

 

Virginia Waterways Cleanup event (part of the International Coastal Cleanup) coordinates more than 200 cleanup events in September and October in Virginia — from the mountains to the ocean.  Last year more than 7,400 volunteers cleaned our waterways   keeping 491,505 POUNDS of plastic and trash out of Virginia’s rivers, bays and our world’s ocean! Join us at a cleanup this fall — You will not only feel good that you are making a positive difference, but the data you collect will be put to work in changing the littering behaviors of people sharing our earth.   Sign up by going to http://www.longwood.edu/cleanva/CleanupEvents2013.html and finding a cleanup that is convenient for you.

 

***  Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup:

 

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/our-work/marine-debris/

 

***  Meet Rippl

 

Rippl is a free mobile application that helps you make simple, sustainable lifestyle choices.

 

With Rippl, you’ll get:

 

•Free green living tips to help improve your day-to-day habits

 

•Ability to set goals and track your progress to show your impact

 

•Customizable alerts to help you succeed based on your needs, schedule and habits

 

•Science-based recommendations for proven ways to help grow a healthy environment

 

•Opportunity to suggest your own tips to the community and share your success with your friends

 

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/do-your-part/rippl.html

 

***  Trail Cameras

 

For land trusts and other land conservation organizations, trail cameras, also called game cameras, scouting cameras, or camera traps, can be effective ways to “see” what’s happening on your conservation land when you’re not there. Typical uses for these automated watchers include:

• search for and document cryptic wildlife such as bobcat
• determine deer population density
• count visitors/users
• deter illicit activity/identify people engaged in illicit activity (dumping, ATVs, poaching)

 

Some conservationists have been reluctant to take advantage of these cameras’ potential because of uncertainty about the legality of such surveillance. RI Natural History Survey (RINHS) with assistance from the Land Trust Alliance and the RI Land Trust Council investigated the legal issues involved in remote surveillance on conservation land in Rhode Island.

 

http://rinhs.org/partners-resources/trail-cameras/

 

***  Yeah, there’s a fee for that:

 

Ryanair agreed to accept American Express cards for a fee “of 2 percent of the total transaction value” on top of other booking fees. The Irish low-cost carrier cast the move as a play to gain more bookings from “business travelers, travel agents and corporate travel departments,” according to a statement attributed to deputy chief executive and CFO Howard Millar. He estimated that “20 percent to 25 percent of our passengers are traveling on business” and hinted at further plans to “roll out a range of business-tailored services.”

http://www.businesstravelnews.com/Expense-Management/Ryanair-agreed-to-accept-American-Express-cards-for-a-fee–of-2-percent-of-the-total-transaction-value–on-top-of-other-booking-fees/?ib=Airlines&a=mgmt&cid=eltrDaily

 

***  10 Best National Parks for Fall Trips

 

This is Ned’s favorite time of the year!

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-best-national-parks-for-fall-trips?ref=news_fd_091413#!1-intro

 

***  Best Geocaching Websites:

 

Ned’s comment:  My geocaching experience involved one excurion deep into the Wasatch mountains.  I found the cache, but more memorable was the water ouzel I saw.  I really haven’t used my Garmin GPS since.

 

http://outdoors.campmor.com/best-geocaching-websites/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=2013_09_06_Campmor_2013&cm_pla=52134&cm_ven=EMAIL#fbid=OsOFUai_NGFFor Defence Global

 

***  Welcome news:

 

TSA Expands PreCheck to Sixty Additional Airports

 

By Matt Alderton

 

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Conference-News/Event-Management-Compaines/Articles/TSA-Expands-PreCheck-to-Sixty-Additional-Airports/?cid=eltrMtgNews

 

***  Chiggers:

 

My recent family camping trip to the mountains outside Luray, Virginia, was my most recent exposure to chiggers.  I also have unhappy memories of getting chiggers on my legs just above my hiking boots after a hike through the Manassas National Battlefield.  This time I noticed them when I awoke and noticed a rash on my legs and torso.  I was wondering if I had bed bugs in my sleeping bag.  But two weeks later the bites are now subsiding.

 

Trombiculidae are a family of mites which bite their host in their larval stage and cause “intense irritation” or “a wheal, usually with severe itching and dermatitis,” and are called chiggers.

 

You can’t see them, and you don’t know that they’re on you right away.

 

http://www.medicinenet.com/chiggers_bites/article.htm

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trombiculidae

 

***  RANKED: The Best Airlines In America

 

I can’t say I agree with this list of the ten best airlines in America, seemingly based on on-time performance.  I would list them in order of least worst.

 

http://www.sfgate.com/technology/businessinsider/article/RANKED-The-Best-Airlines-In-America-4809018.php

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-best-airlines-in-america-2013-9

 

***  The Top 10 Ways to Sleep on a Plane

 

By Kate Mulcrone

 

(Ned’s comment:  They left off the best one of all.  East a big meal and take a sleeping pill.  You’ll wake up when you smell the coffee somewhere over Ireland.)

 

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/The-Top-10-Ways-to-Sleep-on-a-Plane/?cid=eltrTop10

 

***  10 Perfect Outfits for Long-Haul Flights

 

Ned’s comment:  Sorry guys.  This Fodor’s story is just for girls.  I admit I have some favorite comfy clothes for long trips.  It can get damn cold on those planes, especially if you get the much sought after exit row.  And I also admit that I have a special pair of socks I save for the homeward bound legs…and feet.  One piece of advice: remember that you may need to shed layers to go through security, and you may have to take off your shoes, so pick hole-less-hose on travel days.  One lady ahead of me in the TSA line for a flight had to get down to a slinky tank top which exposed her slinky thong.  She turned to me and said, “I usually get dinner and a movie before I go this far.”

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-perfect-outfits-for-long-haul-flights?ref=news_fd_092113#!1-intro

 

How about you?  Any wardrobe advice for fellow flyers?

Any interesting stories while going through security?

 

Send to Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: September 2013

California’s SMART Pathway

By Laura Stark

 

“They see this project as an enormous opportunity to reinvent themselves as a tourist mecca.”

 

 

When the sunset-hued Golden Gate Bridge first opened more than 75 years ago, it was the engineering marvel of its time. Just north of San Francisco’s famed bridge lies an equally impressive transportation corridor for a new era. When complete, the aptly named SMART Pathway will include the most miles of bike and pedestrian trail alongside active railroad, 52, in the country.

 

Though rail-with-trails are not a new idea—Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC) first reported on them in 1996—they are catching on as a way to create new transportation options in an increasingly constrained urban environment. Today, there are 168 rail-with-trails around the country, a whopping increase of more than 400 percent since RTC’s first report on these projects nearly two decades ago. An updated rail-with-trail report will be published this fall.

 

“We’re building it in the railroad right-of-way and the edge of the trail is pretty close to the tracks,” says Paul Klassen, project manager for the SMART Pathway. “Mostly it’s 10 to 15 feet away, though in some places it’s 100 feet away.”

 

The scope of the project is massive. The Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) commuter rail line and parallel pathway will stretch 70 miles between Cloverdale and Larkspur. This dual transportation system will connect 14 train stations and 10 cities across two counties.

 

“The pathway goes through a lot of historical main street areas,” says John Nemeth, planning manager for the SMART District, which oversees the effort. “It alternates between open space and downtowns, so you can get on and off, and have lunch or go shopping. It’s a town and country experience.”

 

The Marin County Bicycle Coalition has been involved with the pathway since the idea was first conceived in the late 1990s. Its advocacy director, Andy Peri, says the pathway will “create an infinite number of connections. These towns formed along the old rail line. These are population centers with shopping, work places, and schools.”

 

While the area’s rugged hills offer a splendid natural backdrop and a wealth of recreational opportunities—the mountain bike was invented here in the 1970s—they restrict transportation options. “The rail-with-trail project follows Highway 101, which is the only north-south route through Marin County, so it gets quite congested,” says Barry Bergman, manager of trail development at RTC’s Western Office.

 

When traffic backs up, there are no alternative routes for commuters. Originally, only passenger rail service was planned to address the situation, but at the urging of county bicycle coalitions and other advocates, an adjacent pathway was added to the project. “We needed to alleviate congestion through multiple options,” says Carolyn Glendening, SMART’s community education and outreach coordinator. “Working in synergy held more promise than either option alone.”

 

At first, it took some persuading to get everyone on board with the pathway concept, but the project is well underway now. “It had to go through many levels of approval,” says Peri. “Environmental, legislative, funding… and, at every stage, the pathway was in jeopardy. You’re never done until you’re riding the path.”

 

A boost for the effort came in 2008, when a quarter-cent sales tax increase to fund both the rail and the trail was put to voters in Marin and Sonoma counties. A two-thirds supermajority was needed for its passage, and, in the end, nearly 70 percent of voters approved.

 

But the bloom fell off the rose as the recession hit soon after. “The sales tax money dropped off because of the economy,” says Gary Helfrich, executive director for the Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition. “So we had to consider where most people live, and develop that section first. Phase 1 will go from Santa Rosa to San Rafael—county seat to county seat—which are the two largest cities in the North Bay. Phase 2 will be the all the rest.”

 

Of this 38.5-mile stretch, Glendening says, “Phase 1 is fully funded and under construction, starting with the rail portion. The construction contract for some Phase 1 pathway segments will be awarded in the coming months, while other sections are currently under environmental review. Some are even likely to be open and operational before the rail service starts. Beyond Phase 1, the rail and pathway will be completed as funding becomes available.”

 

About five miles of the off-road trail are on the ground already and about a third of the on-road sections are signed and striped. Rail service is expected to begin by late 2015 or early 2016 with trains running every 30 minutes during peak weekday hours. Mid-day and weekend service will also be offered. The train cars will have room for bikes, allowing passengers to combine riding the trail and the train for recreation and commuting.

 

The combination of Sonoma County’s scenic vineyard countryside and Marin County’s craggy terrain may prove irresistible to tourists. “In Marin County, there’s a huge amount of open space,” says Bergman, who regularly hikes in the area with his wife. “There are redwood forests and a beautiful coastline. It’s gorgeous.”

 

The trail’s most unusual feature lies on its southern end: the Cal Park Hill Tunnel, a relic of Northwestern Pacific Railroad, which was active here in the early 1900s when northern California’s towering redwoods were being harvested for lumber. More than 100 years later, the SMART rail line follows that same corridor, converting the tunnel for the modern day by adding a separated trail for bicyclists and pedestrians alongside the trains.

 

RTC provided guidance to Marin County on the project and, inspired by the challenge, published a research report called Tunnels on Trails in 2001. The trail extends a short distance out either side of the 1,100-foot tunnel to connect San Rafael with Larkspur, where trail-goers can catch a ferry to downtown San Francisco.

 

“I was there for the groundbreaking of the tunnel, and this past July I had my first tour of this phenomenal facility,” says Marianne Fowler, RTC’s senior vice present of federal policy. “It’s a key part of the bike/ped infrastructure in Marin County.”

 

A critical piece of funding for the tunnel project was contributed by the Nonmotorized Transportation Pilot Program (NTPP), a federally-funded experiment designed to test the impact of making biking and walking infrastructure a priority of transportation planning. In 2005, Marin County was one of only four communities selected nationwide to receive a $25 million NTPP grant to develop these types of projects and report back on the changes that the investments made in travel habits and other measurable effects.

 

“RTC was instrumental in getting the Pilot Program included in transportation law,” says Fowler. “If Marin County hadn’t received that program grant, the tunnel would probably not have been built as a dual purpose, bike/ped and transit, facility.”

To the north, the SMART Pathway will end at Cloverdale, which, like other small communities along the corridor, stands to gain economically from the people that the SMART system will bring. “Cloverdale is a mill town that’s down on its luck,” says Helfrich. “But their city council really gets it. They see this project as an enormous opportunity to reinvent themselves as a tourist mecca.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Volunteer Opportunities, Rainsong Wildlife Sanctuary, Peninsula Nicoya, Costa Rica

 

WHAT VOLUNTEERS CAN DO: Care for wounded or sick animals, Patrol beaches for turtle nests, Raise and plant tree saplings for reforestation

COSTS: Volunteering: Free!; Accommodations: Free!

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: One-month time commitment, Medical insurance

WEBSITE: www.rainsongsanctuary.com, facebook.com/pages/Rainsong-Wildlife-Sanctuary-Costa-Rica/141821105847000

CONTACT: Mary Lynn Perry (Founder), rainsongwildlifesanctuary@gmail.com, +506 2642 1265

 

http://barefootatlas.com/volunteer/rainsong-wildlife-sanctuary-costa-rica/

 

2.)  Conservation Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., Tiburon, CA

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1837/conservation-intern/job

 

3.)  Volunteering Opportunities, Busch Wildlife Sanctuary at Loxahatchee River District, Jupiter, FL

http://www.buschwildlife.org/volunteer.html

 

4.)  Husky Ranch Adventure, offered through Fronteering Travel Services Inc., Yukon, Canada

 

The Experience

 

Venture to the Northern most territories of Canada for the adventure of a lifetime. Have the opportunity to dog sled and gaze at the amazing northern lights!

 

This ranch needs volunteers all year round and has many great opportunities! This project is a very remote area and your accommodation will be in style without the luxury comforts of the modern world. That means no electricity, but what is there cozier then a crispy and warm fire place? This ranch is extremely popular volunteer abroad project and is great place to experience the bush. Have many opportunities to dogsled during the long winter and of course play with the huskies! This project has excellent opportunities in winter however summer has great long warm days and many opportunities to hike, bike and is a great place for wildlife viewing. The work on the ranch is physically demanding and it is by no means an’ easy holiday option’! The minimum duration of stay is 4 weeks with a maximum duration of 12 weeks. Please consider that you are in a very remote area and this is not the place to be if you are solely interested in pubs and clubs.

 

Why?

 

Play with huskies and go dog sledding!

Live of the grid in a cozy cabin without electricity for the ultimate northern experience!

Volunteer in one of the most beautiful sceneries in the worlds and see the northern lights.

Opportunities for Wildlife viewing in the surrounding the property.

 

Key Start Dates:

 

January, April, July, October (book early in advance to be assured of a volunteer placement)

 

Volunteer duration:  12 weeks

 

Average Work hours:  5,5 days per week starting at 7-8 AM to 6-7 PM (with enough break time in between)

 

Number of Volunteers:  5

 

Volunteer accommodation:  Available

 

Housing Type:  Shared rooms

 

Internet Access:  Yes at the main lodge

 

Who Are They Looking For?

 

Love of the outdoors and a passion for wildlife is a priority. You should not be fussy, picky or hypersensitive about cleaning as this is one of the main chores.  We will not tolerate smoking, alcohol or the use of drugs. Please remember that you are a guest, therefore, respecting the rules is essential.

 

http://www.fronteering.com/trip/husky-adventure

 

5.)  Volunteer opportunity, Keep our parks beautiful, City of Sacramento Volunteer Program, Sacramento, CA

http://www.idealist.org/view/volop/cjgWXbmBJb3p/

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  SPECIAL EVENTS AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR), Arlington County, Arlington, VA

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/arlington/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=721175

***  From Mac’s List:

 

2.)  Vice President Communications and Public Relations, Travel Portland, Portland, OR

 

Travel Portland, an organization dedicated to strengthening the economy by marketing the metropolitan region as a preferred destination for meetings, conventions, and leisure travel, is looking for a proven leader to join our team. The Vice President of Communications and Public Relations leads a dynamic team that targets domestic and international journalists, communicates key messages that reinforce the Portland brand, and secures editorial coverage that supports the organization’s sales efforts and fulfills Travel Portland’s contractual obligations. This position achieves success through the team by providing them with the necessary leadership, resources, and direction. The incumbent carries the full range of management responsibilities.

This is a full-time, benefitted position working 37.5 hours per week from our stunning downtown Portland offices. The successful candidate must have a bachelor’s degree with major course work in communications, public relations or related field, 5 years of management level experience leading a team of public relations/media relations professionals or equivalent combination of experience, education, and training that would provide the skills required for the performance of the essential job duties. This position does involve travel and a valid driver’s license is required.

 

Travel Portland is an EEO/AA/ADA employer committed to diversity.

 

Application Guidelines/Contact:

 

To view the detailed job description for this position, please visit the Travel Portland website at http://www.travelportland.com/about-us/employment-volunteering. The position is open until filled. All interested candidates must apply on line at: jobs@travelportland.com.

 

https://www.macslist.org/macs-list/Travel-Portland/Vice-President-Communications-and-Public-Relations/pY4c1zdJkCdQ/

 

3.)  Media Relations Manager, National Audubon Society, Inc., NY, NY

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1855/media-relations-manager/job

 

4.)  Story and Communications Curator, Marine Mammal Center, Sausalito, California

 

The Marine Mammal Center, an equal opportunity, non-profit employer, is seeking a Story and Communications Curator to join our team. The Marine Mammal Center’s mission is to expand knowledge about marine mammals—their health and that of their ocean environment—and to inspire their global conservation. Our core work is the rescue and rehabilitation of sick and injured marine mammals, supported by state-of-the-art animal care and research facilities, a corps of dedicated volunteers, and an engaged community.

 

The Story and Communications Curator is a full-time, exempt position with competitive benefits. This role requires a strong creative writer and editor who can bring the Center’s work to life through the written word via online and offline marketing channels to help build advocacy and donor support, and to connect with our community. This position is responsible for writing and coordinating email content, related website content and other marketing collateral content. Acting like an internal journalist for The Marine Mammal Center, the Story and Communications Curator has the ability to investigate, write and manage stories (that include scientific details) to appeal to a variety of audiences according to various marketing goals. Creativity, speed and accuracy are a must. This role requires an energetic, organized, creative, and highly detail-oriented individual who is self-motivated, an effective time-manager, and enthusiastic with an innate passion for animal welfar e and environmental conservation. This position reports to the Marketing & Communications Strategy Officer in the Advancement Department.

 

CORE COMPETENCIES

•Excellent grammar, with outstanding written and verbal communication skills

•Demonstrated ability to produce a large volume of story-driven, accurately portrayed written work in a fast-paced environment

•Demonstrated ability to take and edit good quality photographs to accompany content

•Intermediate proficiency with MS Office, specifically Word, PowerPoint, as well as Adobe creative suite, specifically Photoshop and/or AI to edit photographs

•Strong management skills with a team-oriented approach and demonstrated ability to work collaboratively cross-departmentally

•Ability to take direction and work autonomously to meet deadlines

•Creative and flexible out-of-the-box thinker; ability to present new thoughts and ideas regularly

•Good decision-making and problem-solving skills

•Superb time management and multi-tasking skills

•Committed to delivering high quality work with attention to detail

•Meticulous, organized, focused, responsible and trustworthy

•Friendly, self-motivated, proactive, a real go getter and positive

•Must have a positive, can-do attitude

 

MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES Content Creation (50%)

•Conceptualize, research, and write engaging content for online marketing, fundraising and advocacy campaigns, including at least one or two emails and corresponding website content pages per week, and other marketing and PR related projects i.e. writing for blogs and marketing collateral items

•Disseminate all content created each week through to the various marketing and program channels according to the approved weekly plan (i.e. website, social media, (press if relevant), email, third parties etc.)

•Manage the Social Media Manager (a volunteer role) and provide all content to them with clear direction and according to the approved strategy

•Prepare all written and photo content for any partnership/sponsorship campaign

•Work closely with other departments of the Center and through that collaboration, help write and/or edit education, retail and vet sci content for collateral and the website

•Work closely with the Website Specialist to ensure emails and web content is created and uploaded correctly and on time

•Research and propose new content strategy ideas and tests

•Apply established messaging to a variety of marketing tools, taking into account space limitations, branding requirements, target audience and information hierarchy

•Attend weekly “Clinical Rounds” with the veterinary science department to research stories

•Contribute to the development of the content strategy and leads the weekly Content Meetings

•Work closely with the Marketing & Communications Strategy Officer, and Event & Marketing Assistant to research and write online story opportunities to increase visibility on the web i.e. identify relevant like-minded websites and blogs and submit latest news stories and build relationships

 

Editing and Administrating (30%)

•Edit the weekly Communiqué (written by the Executive Director) and Story of the Week (written by the Veterinary Science team)

•Convert science papers into consumer and press friendly 1-2 page synopses which are suitable to be published on the web

•Evaluate and monitor TMMC website content and amends or writes new copy accordingly

•Photograph relevant patients, people, places and products to accompany story, and edit in a photo editing suite

•Upload photographs and written content to an online website (CMS) and email (CRM) system

•Responsible for all media storage and systems, including photography and video

•Ensure compliance with the organization’s policies and procedures, and support the organization’s mission, values, and standards of ethics and integrity. Examples include: abiding by hospital protocol when required to go “behind-the-scenes”; ensuring factual accuracy by fact-checking with relevant departmental experts, receiving approval of story and content from departmental managers; ensuring the organization’s mission is inherent in all content; upload content to the relevant files and systems according to organizational policy

•Attend twice monthly marketing meetings with the Advancement Team to contribute to and update the Advancement Team on project status

 

Public Relations (20%)

•Work closely with the Event & Marketing Assistant to write press releases to support events and campaign launches

•If determined by Marketing & Communications Strategy Officer, serve as PR spokesperson on or offsite as needed

•Manage and work closely with the external PR agency to develop and execute the long-lead PR strategy

 

QUALIFICATIONS

•5+ years of experience writing and proofreading consumer copy in a journalism, marketing and/or nonprofit business capacity

•Degree in Journalism (preferred), English, Marketing, Creative Writing, Advertising, or related field

•Medium to advanced skill level with photographic and video equipment

•Awareness of web content management systems

•Knowledge of nonprofit writing styles and needs preferred

•Knowledge of marine mammals and/or ocean conservation a bonus but not required

•Knowledge of marine science a bonus

•Minimal knowledge of HTML a bonus

•Ability to provide own transport, and be willing to work occasional weekends as Center stories dictate.

 

Application Instructions:

To apply:

 

Please send a cover letter and resume attention Human Resources Director & IT Manager to admin@tmmc.org. Please put “Story and Communications Curator” in the subject line. Please no phone calls or faxed submissions.

 

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=322900012

 

5.)  Tour Guide, Cave of the Mounds, Blue Mounds, WI

 

General Responsibilities

• Welcome tourists and groups who come to Cave of the Mounds NNL

• Conduct safe, enjoyable, and educational tours

•Assist customers in the amazing rock & fossil shop

• Assist customers in the snack bar

• Help to maintain neat, clean and safe buildings and grounds

 

Duties

• Lead interpretive tours of the Cave that are safe, fun, and educational

•Tell the story of the Cave – its formation, growth, discovery, development, and protection – throughout all aspects of time

•Greet the public with a smile and helpful information so they will enjoy their visit to Cave of the Mounds National Natural Landmark

• Assist customers with the sale of merchandise and restock the amazing rock & fossil shop

•Serve customers at the seasonal snack bar in the Visitor Center

•Assist with the processing of merchandise including unpacking, marking, light manufacturing and storing

•Assist with the maintenance of the buildings and grounds through typical tasks and chores such as sweeping, mopping, trash removal, dusting, raking, etc.

 

Qualified Candidates will have:

• Excellent interpersonal communication skills and a friendly manner

•A desire for interaction with the general public and public speaking

• Interest in the natural environment, nature appreciation, nature education

• Good conflict resolution skills and desire to work as a member of a team

• The desire to do a wide variety of tasks in the course of a workday

 

Benefits

• You get to take people through a beautiful Cave!!

•Reciprocity with many, many awesome Wisconsin tourist attractions

•Super cool staff events such as off trail caving, fossil hunts, campfires, and barn movie nights

• Paid training and annual wage review

•The “coolest” summer job EVER!

 

Contact us at  608-437-3038 if interested in employment.

http://www.caveofthemounds.com/employment.htm

 

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

6.)  Bear Tracking – Conservation Biology Volunteers, Ecuador, Andean Bear Foundation, United States

http://bit.ly/1eUa4o1

 

7.)  Development Officer, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Cortez, Colorado

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=26432

 

8.)  Manager, Science Outreach Full-time, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC or Santa Cruz, CA

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/who-we-are/job-listings/manager-science-outreach.html

 

9.)  Manager, Digital Outreach and Fundraising, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/who-we-are/job-listings/manager-digital.html

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for August 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for August 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Climb the mountains and get their good tidings.”

– John Muir

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:

***  20 biggest travel mistakes

***  America’s Dirtiest Hotels

***  America’s most awesome boardwalks

***  QUICK CAMPING TRICKS

***  15 UNESCO Sites to See While You Can

***  A Hiker’s Best Friend

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: August 2013

Tennessee Central Heritage Rail Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  U.S. Forest Service-AMC Alpine Stewardship Volunteer, Franconia Ridge, White Mountains National Forest, New Hampshire

2.)  Volunteer opportunities, MARINE CONSERVATION, O.R.C.A.  (Ocean Research Conservation Africa), Plettenberg Bay, South Africa

3.)  Citizen Science: American Eel Research, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Various locations in New York State

4.)  Volunteer Positions, Devils Tower National Monument, Devils Tower, WY

5.)  Wildlife Intern, Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge, Hollandale , MS

6.)  Public Affairs Intern (local preferred),  Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest, Gainesville, GA

7.)  Sanctuary Ambassador, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, Scituate, MA

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.) Director, Corporate Relations, National Wildlife Federation, Reston, VA

2.)  Volunteer Programs Assistant, The Pacific Crest Trail Association, Sacramento CA

3.)  Executive Director, Wyoming Wilderness Association, Sheridan WY

4.)  Interpretation/Visitor Services Intern, Interpretation/Visitor Services Intern, Charleston , SC

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  20 biggest travel mistakes

By Chuck Thompson, CNN

http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/02/travel/20-travel-mistakes/index.html?hpt=tr_c2

 

***  America’s Dirtiest Hotels

http://www.forbes.com/pictures/eikg45efi/americas-dirtiest-hotels/

 

***  America’s most awesome boardwalks

By Robert Firpo-Cappiello, Budget Travel

http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/23/travel/america-best-boardwalks/index.html?hpt=tr_c1

 

***  QUICK CAMPING TRICKS

 

Want to learn some quick camping tricks? Read our blog post to pick up some tips you can use next time you’re out camping!

 

http://outdoors.campmor.com/14-camping-tips-and-tricks/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=TrailMail-August22013&cm_pla=51688#fbid=OsOFUai_NGF

 

***  15 UNESCO Sites to See While You Can

 

UNESCO’s List of World Heritage in Danger consists of 44 sites that face urgent threats to their integrity as spots of “outstanding universal value,” ranging from environmental degradation to urbanization, overpopulation, and excessive development. These sites are not off-limits to tourists, though. In fact, for some dedicated travelers, there’s no better time to glimpse these historical world wonders before they change—or disappear—forever. Here are 15 of the sites you must see before it’s too late.

 

By Maggie Gorman

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/15-unesco-sites-to-see-while-you-can?ref=news_fd_081713#!1-intro

 

***  A Hiker’s Best Friend

 

Do’s, dont’s, and delights when taking your dog on the trail

 

Story by Lisa Densmore

AMC Outdoors, July/August 2013

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/2013/features/a-hikers-best-friend.cfm

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: August 2013

Tennessee Central Heritage Rail Trail

By Laura Stark

 

“Our identity was coal…Now, our history and our beauty and our tourism will be our focus.”

It’s hard to imagine a prettier place for a rail-trail. The emerging 19-mile Tennessee Central Heritage Rail Trail winds across the high plains of central Tennessee between Cookeville and Monterey, a town “Where the Hilltops Kiss the Sky.” Excitement is building for the new recreational amenity, which will be unique to these communities in a region that already counts itself lucky with gorges, waterfalls, caves, rocky bluffs and the Cumberland Mountains above it all.

 

Named for the Tennessee Central Railroad, a boon for the region in the early twentieth century, the rail-trail offers the enticing potential to spur a new rush of economic opportunity. Its advocates hope that the area’s natural bounty within easy reach of two of the state’s largest cities—Nashville and Knoxville—will make the trail a shoe-in for a tourist destination.

 

“Once the trail opens, it will help the economy greatly around here,” says Ken Hall, Monterey’s cultural administrator. “We lost our identity. Our identity was coal and when that industry died out, the town slowly started to die and we stumbled around looking for an identity. Now, our history and our beauty and our tourism will be our focus.”

 

Hall hopes that when the trail is complete, it will be as well known as the Virginia Creeper. Like its famous cousin, the Tennessee Central Heritage Rail Trail will have no shortage of history for railroad buffs. It’s currently bookended with two trailside depots and, midway, the quaint city of Algood hopes to add a third once its section of trail is complete.

 

“We hope it will help revitalize downtown,” says Keith Morrison, Algood’s City Manager, of the potential new depot. “There used to be a depot here that was a central hub. We want to build a replica and have Algood’s history displayed inside.”

 

On the trail’s western end, the Cookeville depot has stood for more than a century though it had fallen into disrepair after the trains stopped running. It’s hard to imagine now that the beautiful red brick building with its unusual and elegant pagoda-style roof was once scheduled for demolition before a citizens group (later known as the Friends of the Depot) mobilized and restored it.

 

Today, the depot serves as an anchor in Cookeville’s reenergized downtown, surrounded by boutique shops and an eclectic mix of restaurants. Across the street, a large neon sign, nearly dwarfing the building on which it sits, blinks “Cream City Ice Cream,” above an ice cream parlor serving up old-fashioned milkshakes and modern-day lattes.

 

“We don’t have big national brands,” says Melinda Keifer, Cookeville’s economic and community development coordinator. “But we have a strong business community.”

 

The depot in Monterey, on the east end of the trail, opened just last year and has already seen 15,000 visitors. Though it’s a replica, it was thoughtfully recreated from an original diagram of the 1903 building. Ken Hall curates the museum and many of the pieces are his own, handed down from his father who loved the railroad and collected relics from the days of the steam-engine and early diesels.

 

“My grandfather started with the railroad in 1890 and my father in 1934,” says Hall. “All my uncles worked on the railroad, too. Although I didn’t choose the railroad as my career, I wanted that tie to the railroad to complete the circle.”

 

The corridor that the trail follows originally belonged to the Nashville and Knoxville Railroad, founded in 1884, which later became Tennessee Central Railroad. The trains primarily carried coal, as well as other natural resources and manufactured goods. It had a long run, lasting until 1968 before finally going out of business. But the tracks did not stay dormant permanently. Nearly 20 years later, a few trains a week began to roll down the corridor once again under a new banner, the Nashville and Eastern Railroad, which now serves a large sand mining operation and other industries between Nashville and Monterey.

 

A few times a year, vintage 1950s-era trains also whisk bright-eyed tourists from Nashville to Cookeville and other communities along the way to enjoy farmers markets, antique shops, handmade crafts, friendly restaurants, and all the warmth and charm of small Southern towns. The themed rides, organized by the Tennessee Central Railway Museum, include fall foliage sightseeing, journeys with Santa, and Thomas the Train trips that proclaim to give youngsters the “ride of their life.”

 

“The excursion trains carry 300 to 500 people from Nashville to enjoy our town,” says Keifer. As the home of Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville is a college town that she calls, “a happening little place.”

 

The much anticipated pathway will be built on the outer edge of the active railroad’s right-of-way. Such projects, known as rail-with-trails, are not uncommon around the country and offer effective ways of connecting communities. Rails-to-Trails Conservancy is developing a report—anticipated to be published within the next few weeks—to provide tools and information on rail-with-trails like this one for the trail-building community.

 

“The railroad has been wonderful to work with,” says Keifer. “They’ve been ready to compromise and work with us in any way that they can.”

 

Currently, only a half-mile of the Tennessee Central Heritage Rail Trail has been constructed, but more trail is coming, and soon. A partnership of four government agencies—Putnam County, Cookeville, Algood and Monterey—is actively pursuing its development, and a nonprofit volunteer group will manage and maintain the trail.

 

The remainder of the trail will be built in four phases, starting in Cookeville and moving east. Funding is in place for the first phase, a four-mile stretch from Cookeville to Algood, and bidding is expected to get underway within the next few months. Construction may begin as early as next spring. The second phase of nearly seven miles is expected to follow hot on its heels.

 

East of Algood, passage up the side of Brotherton Mountain for phase three will prove a challenge, but also an appealing attraction for adventure seekers. The trail diverts from the rail corridor here with switchbacks used to manage the elevation.

 

“I think the section that will draw the most tourists will be the rustic section between Monterey and Algood,” says Hall. “It will be a beautiful trail with mountain scenery, woodlands and lots of wildlife.”

 

The last phase, about a mile long, will connect the trail to the already open segment in Monterey. The town is awaiting word on a potential grant for construction and, once in hand, can begin the bidding process. Hall thinks the section could be completed as early as the end of the year.

 

After many years of slow, but steady progress, this flurry of activity makes the trail more tantalizingly palpable than ever. “There was a tremendous amount of excitement when the project was originally thrown out there,” says Keifer of the trail, which was first proposed in the mid-2000s. “Once we get our next piece on the ground, it will re-energize that momentum.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  U.S. Forest Service-AMC Alpine Stewardship Volunteer, Franconia Ridge, White Mountains National Forest, New Hampshire

 

Help Protect Alpine Vegetation on Franconia Ridge

 

The U.S. Forest Service-AMC Alpine Stewardship Volunteer program started in 2000, sparked by the dedicated interest of a few individuals. Since its inception, the program has grown to include 12 dedicated Alpine Stewards who patrol Franconia Ridge each weekend from Mid-May through Columbus Day.

 

Through this program, the AMC and the USFS hope to increase the public’s awareness of its impact on the alpine environment and educate ridge visitors about preservation of alpine vegetation. These volunteer Stewards address topics such as the importance of staying within the treadway, prevention of “summit sprawl,” Leave No Trace ethics, ridge safety and low-impact trail tending. While on the trail, they are available to respond to questions or concerns of ridge hikers and can engage visitors in a friendly, educational manner.

 

Who Should Apply

 

The individuals who will most enjoy serving as alpine stewards are those who:

•Have a friendly, outgoing, professional manner, in addition to experience working with the general public in a recreational setting.

•Are an avid hiker with an understanding of the White Mountain National Forest and AMC.

•Are comfortable approaching individuals to provide conservation and safety information.

•Are AMC members.

•Have a current Wilderness First Aid and CPR certification.

•Are committed to the protection of the alpine zone and the promotion of Leave No Trace ethics.

•Are able to provide coverage at least two weekends per year.

•Are able to attend the annual training and meeting, usually held in the spring.

 

What They Do

 

Stewards take on a number of rewarding responsibilities, including:

•Demonstrating and exemplifying appropriate alpine zone behavior and Leave No Trace ethics.

•Approaching hikers to provide education on the alpine zone environment, ecology, Leave No Trace practices and low-impact trail tending.

•Approaching visitors causing a negative impact on the alpine zone to provide education in a friendly, educational manner.

•Providing information to visitors about safety concerns, particularly regarding weather.

•Communicating information concerning Forest Service backcountry camping regulations and Leave No Trace principles, as needed or requested.

•Participating in the AMC Mountain Watch Program’s ozone and visibility study.

 

How the AMC and USFS Support Them

 

The AMC and USFS provide the following for alpine stewards:

•Room and board on the weekends they serve.

•Gear and uniform to use while working.

•Annual training opportunities.

•Recognition for their efforts through Stewardship Society awards, based on the number of hours contributed annually.

 

How to Apply

The Alpine Stewardship Volunteer Program is a small program, being located solely on Franconia Ridge in New Hampshire. We are always interested in receiving applications in the event of an opening, however. For more information, email us by selecting “Volunteers” from this form. Please be sure to include a brief description of why you are interested in the program. You will receive a brochure and an application in the mail.

 

http://www.outdoors.org/volunteers/information/information-alpine.cfm

 

2.)  Volunteer opportunities, MARINE CONSERVATION, O.R.C.A.  (Ocean Research Conservation Africa), Plettenberg Bay, South Africa

 

The Ultimate Whale & Dolphin Experience

 

The O.R.C.A. Marine Foundation is located in Plettenberg Bay on the world famous Garden Route of South Africa. “Plett” (as it’s lovingly referred to by locals) is home to some of the world’s most fascinating marine species and one of the best places in South Africa to view them.  This includes Southern Right Whales, Humpback Whales, Bryde’s Whales, Bottlenose Dolphins, Humpback Dolphins, Common Dolphins, Orca or Killer Whales, and Great White Sharks. A volunteer placement at O.R.C.A. gives a unique, once in life time opportunity to observe these magnificent marine species while participating in exciting marine conservation, community-based and educational volunteer work.

 

Volunteers enjoy trips to sea (in boats and sea kayaks) to view many magnificent animals. The town of Plettenberg Bay, which is dependent on eco-tourism, has benefited significantly from the O.R.C.A.’s programs through community upliftment, information gathered from O.R.C.A. researchers on various aspects of the Bay, and promotion of marine eco-tourism.

 

Recently O.R.C.A. was honoured as the Runner-up for the Indaba/Fair Trade “Excellence in Environmental Stewarship” award.  O.R.C.A.’s mission is to facilitate the implementation of a ‘Best Practise’ model for the management of the Bay and to change community consciousness relating to environmental issues to achieve intelligent co-existence in Plettenberg Bay.

 

O.R.C.A. (Ocean Research Conservation Africa) works in partnership with both the Centre for Dolphin Studies and Ocean Blue Adventures.  If you are passionate about the conservation and sustainability of marine coastal systems, then O.R.C.A. is the ideal project for you.

 

Volunteer Work

 

During your stay in Plettenberg Bay (one of the most breathtaking and serene outdoor classrooms in Southern Africa), you will be lucky enough to witness the power and grace of whales, the exuberance of dolphins, the playfulness of seals, and the majestic beauty of mountain, forest and coastal ecosystems. Above all, being an O.R.C.A. volunteer will allow you to actively participate in conserving our marine life for future generations. Through our O.R.C.A. marine conservation projects, you will help the team manage this marine and coastal zone in a sustainable manner and in the process experience the community, culture and environment in a more intimate way than most visitors.

 

The experienced O.R.C.A. team will help settle you into the program and provide ongoing guidance and mentorship during your stay. You will have the opportunity to take on individual projects, if desired, or integrate with the team.  From assisting the research teams to helping with the community outreach programme, you will find your own way to contribute.

 

All volunteer activities support the conservation and social objectives of the O.R.C.A Marine Foundation. Volunteers will get involved with many of the following (as many activities are weather or seasonally dependent):

 

• Participating in community development and education programmes in local disadvantaged communities (e.g. Qolweni Pre-School).

 

• Organizing and presenting at provincial/national marine and coastal awareness campaigns (such as National Environment Week, National Marine Week, and Youth Day) when they occur.

 

• Experiencing and assisting in amazing marine eco-tourism with Ocean Blue Adventures (whale and dolphin watching).

 

• Monitoring and cleaning campaigns on beaches and coastal regions.

 

• Maintaining, cleaning and collecting food for O.R.C.A.’s aquarium species, which are used for education and conservation purposes.

 

• Sampling, tagging, and monitoring of local fish species.

 

• Fin profiling and spatial distribution programs.

 

• Assisting with O.R.C.A.’s carbon reduction program and removal of alien plant species.

 

• Enjoying educational presentations on conservation and ecological topics.

 

Volunteer placements are always changing and varied, and particularly dependent on weather conditions.  Bad weather may delay conservation/research activities and result in some indoor activities and courses.  Of course, we do our best to get the boats into the ocean as much as possible, although safety comes first.

 

Marine Guiding Course

 

Volunteers staying for 4 weeks or longer have the opportunity to partake in the Marine Guiding Course to qualify as a local marine guide as well as  the Competent Crew Course where volunteers learn basic boat skills, radio work, safety at sea etc.

 

Marine Strandings Course

 

All interested volunteers can participate in the marine strandings course. This is an introduction to first aid for marine animals who strand on our beaches.

 

Other Activities

 

The atmosphere is one of ‘mixing it with the locals’ and O.R.C.A. volunteers are welcomed into local programs and enjoy all kinds of fun extra activities. Rental cars and taxis are available to hire for after hours and weekend activities.

 

Leisure activities in Plett include horseback riding, golf, angling, sailing, scuba diving and surfing, as well as hiking and bird-watching in nearby Robberg, Keurbooms River and Tsitsikamma Nature Reserves. Other highly recommended activities include treetop canopy tours or bungee jumps off the 216m Bloukrans River Bridge (the highest bridge jump in the world)!

 

Field Conditions

 

Plettenberg Bay is a beach-lover’s paradise.  Plett is characterised by sweeping, unspoilt golden beaches, a dramatic rocky peninsula, intriguing estuaries, towering indigenous forests and breathtaking rivers and sea. With its exceptional climate and beautiful viewsover the Indian Ocean, Plettenberg Bay is an idyllic location for a volunteer holiday.

 

The O.R.C.A. volunteer house is very cute.  It is located near the beach, within close proximity to a shopping centre with shops, cinemas, restaurants and bars, and approximately one mile from the O.R.C.A. office in Plettenberg Bay.

 

The house is self-catering, with shared bedroom and bathroom facilities. Basic food for meals is provided at the house. Evening meals are prepared for volunteers six nights per week, though volunteers are also welcome to eat out.  Volunteers may need to pack a lunch for certain activities, but will be informed of this ahead of time when such situations arise.

 

Laundry facilities are available for volunteers, and Teliswa does communal washing weekly.

 

A communal telephone line is available at the volunteer house. The phone can receive incoming calls and make outgoing calls on a world calling card (available at nearby shops). There is ADSL access to the internet at the volunteer house. Skype  is available to those who have access as well as satellite television.

 

Training / Qualifications

 

The program is limited to 12 volunteers to provide a more intimate and personal experience.  Training will be given in various aspects of marine conservation.  No experience is necessary to join.

 

Age Requirement

 

O.R.C.A. accepts volunteers of 16+ years of age.  Volunteers under 16 years old are only considered when accompanied by a parent/guardian.  There isn’t a maximum age limit, though a reasonable fitness level is necessary.

 

Costs

 

Volunteer Contribution:

 

1 week: GB£595 / US$995

 

2 weeks: GB£895 / US$1495

 

3 weeks: GB£1195 / US$1995

 

4 weeks: GB£1495 / US$2495

 

Extra weeks: GB£295 / US$495 per week

 

Please Note:

 

Volunteers receive a $100 discount when joining multiple Enkosini programs.

 

Enkosini uses USD rates as standard due to currency fluctuations. GBP rates are indications of approx recent values. Currency convertor at www.xe.com.

 

Volunteer contributions cover meals, accommodation, activities, transfers from Plettenberg Bay to O.R.C.A., and project donation. Flights and travel/medical insurance are NOT included. The only additional spending money required will be for personal purchases, social excursions away from O.R.C.A., and pre/post project travel.  We do not have discounted rates for partial weeks.

 

Please bear in mind that the sooner you apply, the better your chances of securing your placement!

 

Dates

 

The O.R.C.A. program doesn’t have set dates, though we do try to coordinate arrivals/departures on Sundays whenever possible so that volunteers begin the program together on Mondays.

 

http://www.enkosini.org/ORCAWhale&DolphinResearch.htm

 

3.)  Citizen Science: American Eel Research, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Various locations in New York State

 

The American eel (Anguilla rostrata) is a migratory fish that is born in the Atlantic Ocean and enters North American tributaries as tiny “glass eels”. The species is in decline over much of its range, and baseline studies of migrations are crucial for management.

 

Teams of scientists, students, and community volunteers collect glass eels using net and trap devices on several Hudson River tributaries each spring. The juvenile fish are counted, weighed, and released alive, and other environmental data is recorded. At several sites, herring surveys are also conducted.

 

The project involves students and teachers directly with scientific design and field methods. Students experience their local ecosystem firsthand, and collect important information about migrating fish and environmental conditions over an entire season.

•Check out results from 2013 in the Hudson River American Eel Research Project Overview (PDF, 1.89 mB)

•Download the Hudson River Eel Project Report (PDF) (1.34 mB), which covers results from 2008-2013

 

Information for Volunteers

 

Project Description: Volunteers will check nets one or more days per week. It takes approximately 45 minutes to sample each day. All gear and materials are provided, but personal transportation to the site is required. You should be willing to work outside under variable conditions, wear waders into the stream, and work collaboratively within a team of students and volunteers. The project is fun and provides important data on eel migration.

•Download our Volunteer Flyer (PDF, 255 kB)

 

Contact:

Zoraida Maloney: ztmalone@gw.dec.state.ny.us;  (845) 889-4745  x.107

Chris Bowser: chbowser@gw.dec.state.ny.us

 

Sample streams include:

 

High school students collect eels on a local stream

Poughkeepsie High School students collect

glass eels on the Fall Kill

•Richmond Creek in Staten Island

•Bronx River in the Bronx

•Saw Mill in Yonkers

•Furnace Brook in Cortlandt

•Minisceongo Creek in West Haverstraw

•Indian Brook at Constitution Marsh in Cold Spring

•Quassaick Creek in Newburgh

•Fall Kill in Poughkeepsie

•Crum Elbow Creek in Hyde Park

•Black Creek in Esopus

•Saw Kill in Annandale-on-Hudson

•Hannacroix Creek in New Baltimore

 

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/49580.html

 

4.)  Volunteer Positions, Devils Tower National Monument, Devils Tower, WY

 

Devils Tower National Monument has a very active volunteer program. Our VIPs (Volunteers-in-the-Parks) help support the Monument in a variety of ways. There are five basic positions that are recruited for at the Monument:

1.Visitor Center Assistant – provides information and orientation to park visitors; assists with junior ranger programs; roves hiking trails and prairie dog town

2.Climbing – provides information to climbers; assists with climbing patrols

3.Maintenance – performs a variety of maintenance tasks such as trash collection, construction or repair of trails, cleaning, small projects, etc.

4.Adminstrative Clerk – Answers phones, assists with filing, inputing of data, etc.

5.Campground Host – provides information and assistance to visitors camping in monument; roves campground

 

http://www.nps.gov/deto/supportyourpark/volunteer.htm

 

5.)  Wildlife Intern, Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge, Hollandale , MS

http://www.thesca.org/wildlife-intern/po-00188061

 

6.)  Public Affairs Intern (local preferred),  Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest, Gainesville, GA

 

This position would work from the Forest Supervisor’s Office located in Gainesville, Georgia. The Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests provide the finest outdoor recreation opportunities and natural resources in Georgia. Featuring nearly 867,000 acres across 26 counties, hundreds of miles of clear-running streams and rivers, approximately 850 miles of recreation trails, and dozens of campgrounds, picnic areas, and other recreation activity opportunities, these lands are rich in natural scenery, history and culture. The mission of the USDA Forest Service is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the nation’s forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. The Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests is part of the Southern Region, with the Forest Supervisor’s office managing four District units in Blairsville (Blue Ridge District), Lakemont (Chattooga River District), Chatsworth (Conasauga District), and Eatonton (Oconee District).

 

The Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests public affairs intern is expected to have a high level of experience with social media, and be able to think strategically and see how social media fits into a marketing strategy. The intern must be able to assist in formulating social media plans and then carry them out with direction of the Public Affairs team. S/he must be able to measure and document the impact of social media, and then suggest action-steps to increase impact.Specific tasks include:

•Researches, understands and follows Forest Service social media policies and guidelines

•Monitors USDA and Forest Service social media accounts (Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, Facebook, blog, etc.)

•Helps to tell our story by developing strategic marketing plans, including characteristics and needs of the target audiences, communication techniques most appropriate, and recommended approaches

•Works with the Public Affairs team to write and post feature articles, blogs, tweets, etc.

•Tracks growth and impact of social media efforts

•Shoots and edits videos to USDA standards, uploads videos

•Photographs sites and events on the forest, edits photos, catalogues and tags photos, creates metadata, uploads photos

•Contributes content for forest website including photos, videos and written articles

•Explores new ways to connect with young audiences

•Reaches out to diverse, minority and urban audiences

•Seeks out opportunities to partner in existing programs and projects, leveraging Forest Service resources

 

Skills and attributes interns are expected to have:

•Excellent written communication skills

•Creative!

•Interest in the outdoors, the national forest and conservation issues

•Extensive knowledge of social media –Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, blogs, etc.

•Ability to develop a marketing plan using a standard process and template as provided

•Knowledge of digital media software – Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Lightroom are pluses

•Knowledge of video editing software – Premiere Elements is a plus

•Willingness to create blogs, write press releases, create videos, and post tweets daily

•Energy, with a desire to come up with fresh ideas

•Ability to identify a target market and “speak” to that audience through social media

•Experience proofreading and editing

•Willingness to explore sites on the forest, taking photos, shooting video, talking to visitors, participating in conservation work

 

There is potential for this position to be extended beyond 12 weeks. This position is not eligible for an AmeriCorps Education Award.

 

http://www.thesca.org/public-affairs-intern-local-preferred/po-00345364

 

7.)  Sanctuary Ambassador, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, Scituate, MA

 

Volunteer with Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary and significantly contribute to our ongoing education and conservation efforts. In return, you can explore interests, develop marketable skills, enrich your own education, discover new talents, have fun, and make a difference.

 

•Complete a volunteer application (PDF file, 32KB). Fax or mail the completed, signed form to:

Anne-Marie Runfola, Volunteer Coordinator

Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary

175 Edward Foster Rd.

Scituate, MA 02066

781-545-8036 (f)

Contact Anne-Marie with questions and ideas: anne-marie.runfola@noaa.gov, or 781-545-8026

http://stellwagen.noaa.gov/involved/vol_open.html

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.) Director, Corporate Relations, National Wildlife Federation, Reston, VA

http://ch.tbe.taleo.net/CH18/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=NWF&cws=1&rid=553

 

2.)  Volunteer Programs Assistant, The Pacific Crest Trail Association, Sacramento CA

 

Work passionately on behalf of the finest hiking and equestrian trail. Our work place matches the quality of trail that we steward. Join us.

 

The Pacific Crest Trail Association, headquartered in Sacramento, California is dedicated to protecting, preserving and promoting the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. The following staff position is currently open:

 

Volunteer Programs Assistant

 

In this position you will have the opportunity to:

 

Recruit and support trail crew volunteers

 

Maintain website updates for volunteer projects to ensure content is fresh, current, and concise

 

Demonstrate continuous effort to improve operations, streamline work processes, and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality seamless customer service to volunteers

 

Work to develop new volunteer opportunities and assist in filling these positions

 

Ensure that volunteers are continually recognized and rewarded for their work

 

The Volunteer Programs Assistant is a key full-time staff position working in the Sacramento office. Salary is dependent on qualifications. Benefits include health insurance, a contribution to a 401k plan, 11 paid holidays, paid vacation and paid sick leave.

 

We are seeking applicants with:

 

A bachelor’s degree

 

Minimum of three years of relevant professional experience that involves work with volunteers and work with nonprofit organizations

 

Ability to work independently to bring a project to completion and skills in facilitating partnerships, developing collaborative projects, prioritizing and managing multiple tasks

 

Excellent organizational, analytical, writing and oral presentation skills

 

Excellent interpersonal and relationship-building skills

 

Ability to interact well with a wide range of people of all levels within and outside the organization

 

Strong research and information gathering skills

 

Strong computer literacy; database experience

 

Able to work independently and as part of a team

 

Positive, flexible, creative attitude and a sense of humor

 

Ability and willingness to travel on the PCT

 

Ability and willingness to travel and work a variable schedule including weekends

 

Trail crew volunteer opportunities experience

 

Familiarity and interest in environmental issues, trails, and backcountry recreation

 

Submit application by August 29th. Please e-mail resume, letter of interest detailing applicable qualifications, list of three references, and salary history to hr@pcta.org with the subject Volunteer Programs Assistant. Review the documents below for more information.

http://www.ecojobs.com/jobs_details.php?sec=3EW&AID=86007

 

3.)  Executive Director, Wyoming Wilderness Association, Sheridan WY

http://www.ecojobs.com/jobs_details.php?sec=1EW&AID=85951

 

4.)  Interpretation/Visitor Services Intern, Interpretation/Visitor Services Intern, Charleston , SC

http://www.thesca.org/interpretationvisitor-services-intern/po-00378741

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for July 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for July 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Man is so made that he can only find relaxation from one kind of labor by taking up another.”

― Anatole France

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

***  This edition of Your Very Next Step comes to you from Auburndale, Massachusetts

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 591 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Hiking with Dogs

***  The Top 10 Places to Eat Ice Cream

***  The road less traveled

***  In Wildness Benefit concert

***  I love this idea:  Rent-a-Backcountry-Canoe

***  Festivals we missed for 2013:  FinnFest

 

***  Track any 787 flight

***  Get miles for your pet

***  It’s Hot Out There… Enjoy the Water Safely and Responsibly

***  HAMMOCK CAMPING 101

***  Appalachian Trail Hikers Are Going Digital

***  10 Most Wi-Fi Connected US Airports and 10 Least-Connected

***  Rare Black Jellyfish Seen at San Diego Beaches

***  Palau’s Jellyfish Lake

***  Stranger things have happened in hotels

***  8 Far-Flung Walking Sojourns

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: July 2013

Illinois’ Rock Island Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  SEASONAL PARK ATTENDANT at Button Bay State Park, Vermont State Parks, Ferrisburgh, Vermont

2.)  Russian Olive Removal and Chipping Along the Poudre River Corridor, CSFS Volunteer Program, Fort Collins, Colo.

3.)  Wisconsin Frog and Toad Survey, Wisconsin DNR, madison, WI (Survey locations throughout the state)

4.)  Visitor center volunteer, Wisconsin State Park System, Various locations in Wisconsin

5.)  Tillamook State Forest, Oregon Department of Forestry, Tillamook, OR

6.)  Forest watch volunteers, Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Various locations

7.)  Pacific Northwest Trail Volunteer Trail Crew, Pacific Northwest Trail Association, Sedro-Woolley, WA

8.)  CRANE INTERNSHIP, Audubon Species Survival Center (SSC), Audubon Nature Institute, New Orleans, LA

9.)  Insect Keeper Intern, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO

 

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Communications Manager, California Native Plant Society, Sacramento, California

2.)  Avian Field Assistants: migrant use of hardwood habitats, Old Dominion University, Virginia / Maryland

3.)  Executive Director, Seattle Audubon Society, Seattle, Washington

4.)  Outreach Specialist, Center for EcoTechnology, Northampton, Massachusetts

5.)  Park Ranger Assistant, Sacramento County, Sacramento, CA

6.)  Park Ranger, Lifeguards, booth and Grounds Maintenance, Saginaw County Parks, Saginaw, MI

7.)  PARK RANGER II (RESTRICTED), Hillsborough County, Tampa, FL

8.)  Full Time Ranger, The Wildlands Conservancy, Wind Wolves Preserve, California

9.)  Outdoor School – Instructor, REI, Fairfax, VA

10.)  Park Ranger, City of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

11.)  Marketing and Communications Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., New York, NY

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  The road less traveled:

 

Dear Ned,

 

I was so captivated by your storytelling that my very next step – which should have been working on a rather pedestrian assignment – detoured to places I’ve never been. Thanks for sharing your adventures and authentic observations from UAE, India, Singapore and parts beyond. I don’t always travel vicariously, but when I do, I choose YVNS.

 

Carry on! (your luggage and your fine travel narratives)

 

With appreciation from Texas,

 

Susan

 

Susan H. Burnell, APR

 

***  Cape Cod:

 

We had a very brief “vacation” at the family house in Harwich, Mass.    It’s been in the family since 1937.  This time the house had a “for sale” sign on the front lawn.  I spent time cleaning the attic and garage, doing some yard work and taking five loads to the town landfill.  But we still made time to go out to a couple of our favorite dinig establishments, Ruggis’s for breakfast;Bonatt’s for melt-a-ways, of course; Buca’s Tuscan Roadhouse; and The Port for dinner; and Sir Cricket’s for seafood.  We made the obligatory visit to the Bird Watchers General Store, where both Tom and I told jokes and we each got a pencil.  We also saw our picture on the wall, winners in the t-short contest, taken in the Gros Ventre wilderness during ArrowCorps 2008 (http://birdwatchersgeneralstore.com/Contest2012.htm).

 

Barbara and I were going fishing, so we bought a flounder rig and some sea worms at Goose Hummock shop.  In fact, we caught a fish on the first day on the Wychemere Jarbor jetty.  On the second morning Tom came with us.  In trying to free the hook in some seaweek he slid on the rocks, which put an end to fishing.  He’s fine, but it was painful.

 

We went to a Harwich Mariners game against the Orleans Redbirds.  The Mariners were behind when we left (we waited until the 50-50 winners were announced, and we won a ten dollar gift certificate to Ruggi’s) because we wanted to get to Sundae School before they closed (http://www.sundaeschool.com/Locations.aspx).  We thought we saw lightening on the way home.  Tom checked huis smart phone which informed us there was zero percent chance of parcipitation.  It was coming down in torrent when we got home.

 

We got our residents beach parking sticker for the last time, and enjoyed walks on Bank Street beach and at Sand Pond and Seymours Pond.

 

We sepent a few days in Aubuirndale at my mother’s house before Laura and the kids returned to Washington and I stayed behind to help out for a week or so.

 

The Cape house has been sold. But I can always hear the twang of the rusty spring and the slam of the screen door.  In fact, I can hear it right now, and I can imagine myself walking out onto the soft grass in my bare feet.

 

***  In Wildness Benefit concert

 

September 22nd, 2013 we will be celebrating our trails and rivers with a fundraising concert to be held at the Seattle Mountaineers Program Center. The In Wildness Benefit concert will help to create regional visibility and lend support to the PNTA, the Wild Rivers Foundation and the Seattle Philharmonic Orchestra.

http://www.pnt.org/inwildness.html

 

***  Hiking with Dogs on travels fur and near…

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/web/hiking-with-dogs.cfm

 

***  The Top 10 Places to Eat Ice Cream

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/The-Top-10-Places-to-Eat-Ice-Cream/

 

***  I love this idea:  Rent-a-Backcountry-Canoe

 

…Canoes are available at quite a few of the back country pond sites.  $1/hour on the honor system in the back country though some sites closer to the road need a key you pick up when you check in…

 

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/trip-reports/topics/146513.html

 

***  Festivals we missed for 2013:  FinnFest

 

On Midsummer’s Eve 1865, some thirty Finns and Sámi landed on the shores of the Portage Canal in Hancock, Michigan, and began work in the copper mines the next day. Though much has changed since then, we have maintained many of the traditions these people brought with them, forming our own unique Finnish American culture that reflects our roots and our continued ties to Finns worldwide.

 

Hancock remains a pivotal center of Finnish American culture.So join us at Midsummer — our legendary winter snows will have melted away, revealing stunning surroundings to immerse yourself in. We are ready to provide you with an unforgettable FinnFest experience, done in true Copper Country style — copper over gold, sauna over spa and pasty over pâté. We’ll have our coffee brewing, our saunas warming, and our communities ready to welcome both new and longtime friends.

 

http://www.finnfestusa2013.org/

 

***  This is cool:

 

I’ve flown a lot of different aircraft, including the new 787-8, A-380 and 787.

 

There aren’t so many of them in the world…so you can use this Google Earth application to see where every inflight 787 is at the moment, from multiple points of view.

 

This is a cool app that lets you track any 787 flight:

 

http://www.newairplane.com/787/dreamliner-live/

 

Frequent felines?

 

Dogs and cats that travel on a Virgin Australia domestic flight can now collect points for their owners that can then be used to obtain discounts on future flights.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/10157175/Pet-miles-reward-frequent-fliers.html

 

***  It’s Hot Out There… Enjoy the Water Safely and Responsibly

http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/outdoor-report/2013/07/10/#intro

 

***  HAMMOCK CAMPING 101

 

Learn the basics of hammock camping and experience a different way to sleep and relax on your next camping trip!

http://outdoors.campmor.com/hammock-camping-101/#fbid=OsOFUai_NGF

 

***  From Bernie Wagenblast’s TCN Newsletter:

 

Appalachian Trail Hikers Are Going Digital

Link to article in The Star-Ledger:

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2013/07/appalachian_trail_goes_digital.html

 

10 Most Wi-Fi Connected US Airports and 10 Least-Connected

Link to article on Skift:

http://skift.com/2013/07/18/10-most-wi-fi-connected-u-s-airports-and-10-least-connected/

 

(I think this is misleading.  It shows which airports have the most connections with a paid service.  For me, I conne3ct for free, or not at all.)

 

 

***  Rare Black Jellyfish Seen at San Diego Beaches

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/52492141/ns/local_news-san_diego_ca/t/rare-black-jellyfish-seen-san-diego-beaches/

 

***  Palau’s Jellyfish Lake

http://travel.ninemsn.com.au/glance/329443/jellyfish-lake-draws-a-crowd.glance

 

***  Stranger things have happened in hotels

 

Would you share a hotel room with a stranger to get money off your bill?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/10182183/Sleep-with-a-stranger-for-a-half-price-room.html

 

***  8 Far-Flung Walking Sojourns

 

by  Larry O’Hanlon

http://news.discovery.com/adventure/travel/walking-sojourns-130701.htm

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: July 2013

Illinois’ Rock Island Trail

By Laura Stark

 

“The trail has become part of the fabric of their lives.”

 

Midway between Chicago and St. Louis, lies a rail-trail of such character and beauty that it inspired a lifetime of trail advocacy in not just one, but two recipients of our highest honor, the Doppelt Family Rail-Trail Champion Award. One of these champions, former U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood grew up in Peoria, which anchors the southern end of the Rock Island Trail that winds through central Illinois.

 

“He’s been a direct friend of the trails in Illinois and the Rock Island Trail—no doubt about it,” says George Bellovics with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR), which manages most of trail. “His legacy is well known and appreciated by people in the area.”

 

The other is George M. Burrier, Jr., who heads the Friends of the Rock Island Trail group and has been involved in the trail’s development for more than 30 years.

 

Such devotion to the trail is not unusual. “We get a lot of local users,” says Bellovics. “The trail has become part of the fabric of their lives.”

 

IDNR’s portion of the trail, which stretches 26 miles from Toulon to Alta (just north of Peoria), has a distinct country feeling: rolling farmlands, splashes of wildflowers, and leafy canopies offering a cool respite in the warm summers. A railroad relic, the Spoon River trestle bridge, offers postcard-perfect views. “The trail is a slice of Midwestern Americana,” says Bellovics.

 

Just a few months ago, the nonprofit organization Trails for Illinois released a report, Making Trails Count in Illinois, which shared the results of a 13-week usage study on six trails throughout the state, including the Rock Island Trail. The study, done in partnership with Rails-to-Trails Conservancy, showed that the trail’s average estimated annual use ranged from 3,380 on its rural northern end to 36,535 on its urban southern side.

 

“Those figures may seem small compared to trails in larger metro areas,” says Steve Buchtel, Trails for Illinois’ executive director, “But for small communities outside Peoria, like Toulon with a population of less than 2,000, they’re connected to a trail that sees thousands of people. That’s quite an economic opportunity.”

 

The small country towns that the trail goes through—Toulon, Wyoming, Princeville, Dunlap, and Alta—are known for their hospitality. Eric Oberg, trail development manager for RTC’s Midwest Regional Office, recalls seeing a “Trail Users Welcome” sign outside a bar and grill right off the trail in Toulon with staff that “couldn’t be more accommodating or nice.”

 

And the trail is proving to be of value to residential developers, too. “Tons of residences are going up along the trail,” says Michael Friberg, a project manager for the Peoria Park District. “They all have put in connections to the Rock Island Trail, which speaks highly of it being a benefit.”

 

Buchtel hopes the report will help build the case for the economic value of trails. “The old mindset was: ‘Trails just don’t bring business,'” he says. “It’s exciting to have data that shows otherwise and profoundly. We found that a third of survey respondents made a purchase while using the trail.”

 

Oberg also points out that, “The trail counts showed the untapped potential of the trail. The counts could be even higher, but there’s a lack of awareness. The trail is a wonderful amenity that’s underused.”

 

This lack of awareness is an issue that Buchtel agrees with and he hopes in the future that the state will promote more trail-based tourism.

 

“When I speak to groups, there will be 150 people in the room,” says Buchtel. “I’ll ask, ‘Who’s been on the Rock Island Trail?’ and almost no one raises a hand. But if I ask who’s been on the Elroy-Sparta, hands in the whole room go up. We have trails that can go toe-to-toe with theirs, but Wisconsin invites people to come.”

 

At the time that the Elroy-Sparta State Trail opened in 1967, the history of the Rock Island Trail was just beginning. The trail’s corridor was donated to IDNR in 1969 by a nonprofit group, the Forest Park Foundation, who had acquired it from the Peoria and Rock Island Railroad a few years earlier. In 1973, the land became a state park, but the idea soon arose to develop a rail-trail through it to increase its accessibility and value. Resistance from adjacent landowners who instead wanted to claim the property for their own was swift and furious. When trail work began between Toulon and Wyoming, trail champion Burrier helped to restore a bridge set on fire by opponents.

 

Progress continued, but sometimes covertly. In 1986, the Friends of the Rock Island Trail secretly purchased the last remaining depot on the line. Today, Wyoming Station serves as a visitor center and railroad museum.

 

“We bought it from one of our supporters and I did the legal work,” says Burrier, a former attorney. “We spent a few years restoring the depot, then gave it to the IDNR. Now, those same people that opposed the trail are volunteering in the depot.”

 

All 26 miles opened in 1989 and the rail-trail was officially dedicated the following year in a ceremony Burrier well remembers. “There was a lot of excitement for the people that had fought for so many years.”

 

More than 20 years later, the Rock Island Trail continues to grow. “It’s set to extend into downtown Peoria and on down to the Illinois River,” says Oberg. “That extension is going to be huge. People will be able to use Peoria as a starting or stopping point for the trail with all the amenities that a big city has to offer.”

 

This newer, urban section at the southern end of the Rock Island Trail is being managed by the Peoria Park District. Over the course of its development, this section has gone by a few other names, such as the Pimiteoui Trail and the Kellar Branch Trail, which are no longer officially used. When complete, the extension will run continuously from the state-owned section ending at Alta down to the Bob Michel Bridge, a distance of about 14 miles, all paved. A few short segments are currently open to the public, but the remainder is slated to be finished by the end of the year.

 

The extension provides access to two Peoria attractions that opened just last year: the stunning Riverfront Museum and the family-friendly Caterpillar Visitor Center, showcasing exhibits by the familiar black-and-yellow branded construction equipment company that’s headquartered here. Older, but no less worthwhile attractions, include the historical Springdale Cemetery founded in 1855 and Glen Oak Park, which dates back to the late 1800s and houses a zoo, botanical garden, fishing lagoon and other recreational amenities.

 

Unfortunately, heavy rainfall has caused washouts and other problems for IDNR’s portion of the trail, which has a crushed limestone surface. “Recently, there’s been damage to the trail due to some wicked storms,” says Bellovics. “We’ve closed off portions of the trail and are making repairs. There’s a closed segment of three miles between Toulon and Wyoming that includes the Spoon River bridge. Although there’s no detour signage, you can get around it easily with low-volume local roads.”

In addition to the repair work, which IDNR hopes to have mostly completed over the next few weeks, the organization is upgrading and paving all six of the trail’s access parking lots, adding new entrance signs, and creating trail kiosks. The projects should be done by the fall, in time to enjoy the trail’s bright autumn hues.

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  SEASONAL PARK ATTENDANT at Button Bay State Park, Vermont State Parks, Ferrisburgh, Vermont

 

Seasonal park attendants wanted for immediate hire. Performs general mainte-nance and park operations. Position reports to the park ranger. Must be highly motivated and enthusiastic, able to work with little supervision. Helpful friendly attitude and ability to provide excellent customer service. Duties include grounds keeping; facility and equipment maintenance; cleaning rest rooms; taking reservations and fees. Must be able to lift heavy items and work outdoors in hot and sunny or cold and rainy conditions. 40 hrs/week. Weekends included, times may vary, $8.68/hour.

Button Bay, a 253-acre park, is located on a bluff in Ferrisburgh along the 130-mile long Lake Champlain. Historically, the area has been visited by such notables as Samuel De Champlain (1609), Ethan Allen (1776), Ben Franklin (1776), and Benedict Arnold (1777). What once operated as a farm, opened as a state park in 1964. The park is so named for the button-like concretions formed by clay deposits found along the shoreline.

 

Apply online by clicking on ‘How to Apply’

 

http://www.vtstateparks.com/htm/buttonbay.htm

http://www.vtstateparks.com/htm/employment_jobs.htm

 

2.)  Russian Olive Removal and Chipping Along the Poudre River Corridor, CSFS Volunteer Program, Fort Collins, Colo.

 

Saturday, August 24

 

•We will assist Larimer County staff and volunteers in this project

•Work will take place along the Poudre River corridor near Timnath and the River Bluff’s Open Space

•We will need qualified sawyers for cutting. If you wish to cut, you must provide proof of your S212 or equivalent saw certification

•Meeting location: Fort Collins District Office, 3843 Laporte Ave., Fort Collins

•Time: 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. (we may return earlier)

•Transportation: We will carpool in CSFS vehicles

•Contact: jamie.dahl@colostate.edu

 

The CSFS Volunteer Program provides an opportunity for you to help us enhance public understanding of forestry’s role and value in a healthy natural environment through hands-on projects and training.

 

http://csfs.colostate.edu/pages/volunteer-opportunities.html

 

3.)  Wisconsin Frog and Toad Survey, Wisconsin DNR, madison, WI (Survey locations throughout the state)

 

The main goal of this survey is to determine the status, distribution, and long-term population trends of Wisconsin’s twelve frog species. Annual statewide surveys began in 1984, and it is now one of the longest running amphibian monitoring projects in North America. Participants choose an established route and conduct three night-time surveys a year: in the early spring, late spring, and summer. No formal training is necessary, but volunteers are asked to follow a simple protocol, fill out and submit data sheets, and familiarize themselves with the different frog calls.

http://dnr.wi.gov/volunteer/animals/FrogsToads.html

 

4.)  Visitor center volunteer, Wisconsin State Park System, Various locations in Wisconsin

 

•Greet visitors and provide brochures, maps, program schedules and answer questions.

•Assist park visitors with vehicle admission stickers, campsite registration and state trail passes.

•Staff a visitor center information desk or gift shop.

•Help coordinate special events.

•Help design and prepare exhibits, displays, and bulletin boards.

•Help market and advertise park programs.

•Provide newsletters, brochures, fact sheets, and information about the local area.

 

•Find a State Park, Forest, Recreation Area, or Trail (http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/parks/findapark.html).

 

http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/parks/volunteer.html

 

5.)  Tillamook State Forest, Oregon Department of Forestry, Tillamook, OR

 

On the second Saturday of September, and October, the Oregon Department of Forestry hosts trail work parties on the OHV trail network in the Tillamook State Forest that are open to the entire OHV use community.

 

OHV trail work parties focus on some new trail construction but mainly on trail maintenance such as cleaning out drainage structures, blocking illegal trails, or clearing down trees and on trail upgrades such as installing drainage structures, spreading pit run rock to harden trails, or constructing reroutes to create a more sustainable trail system.

 

In 2012, volunteers from the OHV Community donated over 1,200 hours of their time to helping the Oregon Department of Forestry maintain the trails in th Tillamook State Forest.

 

If you’d like to get involved in helping to take care of the OHV Trails you love, check out the work party calendar and plan a trip to the Tillamook State Forest around a work party date.  It’s a great opportunity to give back and to learn more about the outstanding organizations that co-host the work parties with Oregon Department of Forestry staff.

 

RSVP POLICY

Due to ODF staffing levels, a minimum of 5 volunteer RSVPs will be required in order to guarantee that a scheduled work party will take place.  If you are interested in volunteering for a particular work party please contact the staff member listed by at least 24-hours prior to the date listed on the OHV Work Party calendar.

 

For More Information

Jahmaal Rebb

OHV Specialist

Forest Grove

503.359.7463

jrebb@odf.state.or.us

 

Dave Hiatt

OHV Specialist

Tillamook

503.815.7024

dhiatt@odf.state.or.us

 

http://www.oregon.gov/odf/tillamookstateforest/pages/ohvtrailworkparty.aspx

 

6.)  Forest watch volunteers, Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Various locations

 

Would you like to be a forest watch volunteer?

 

Forest watch volunteers in DNR’s Southeast RegionWould you like to be a forest watch volunteer?

Forest watch volunteers help protect and enhance DNR-managed land while working with the public to encourage appropriate recreation use. Volunteers also educate the public about the value of natural resources and DNR’s role as steward of more than 3 million acres of state trust lands.

 

What Do Forest Watch Volunteers Do?

 

Provide information to visitors.

Monitor and observe trails, sites, and facilities.

Document and report safety concerns and suspicious or criminal activities.

 

Expectations of forest watch volunteers

 

Provide friendly, courteous information and assistance to forest visitors.

Represent  DNR in a professional manner.

Complete all required training.

Follow safety procedures.

Serve within the scope and limits of assigned volunteer responsibilities.

Accurately report observations and complete required records and timesheets.

 

Benefits  to you, as a forest watch volunteer

 

Be a part of providing an important and meaningful service in protecting and enhancing state trust lands.

Learn new skills and information.

Improve recreation trails, sites, and facilities.

Meet other people who share a passion for outdoor recreation.

Enhance your resume with documented volunteer work experience. All state, county, and municipal job openings in Washington State permit each hour of qualified volunteer service to equal one hour of required work experience.

 

Contact:

 

Ken Dean

Forest Watch Program Coordinator

360-902-1701

kenneth.dean@dnr.wa.gov

 

http://www.dnr.wa.gov/RecreationEducation/Topics/OtherRecreationInformation/Pages/amp_rec_volunteer_watch.aspx

 

7.)  Pacific Northwest Trail Volunteer Trail Crew, Pacific Northwest Trail Association, Sedro-Woolley, WA

 

The construction of the Pacific Northwest Trail has been in the process for years by work crews organized and lead by the PNTA. Some of these crews are made up of volunteers who donate their time and effort to help develop and maintain the trail. If you are looking for a challenging activity that is both enjoyable and rewarding and that gives you the chance to work in the outdoors and be with some wonderful people, you’ve come to the right place! The PNTA, along with other hiking and equestrian groups, assists the US Forest Service, National Park Service, State Parks, and other agencies with the care of the PNNST.

 

The Pacific Northwest Trail Association’s has a number of active volunteer groups that work on different sections of the trail. To find a group near you start your search here: http://www.pnt.org/Trail_Maintenance.html.

 

http://www.pnt.org/volunteer.html

 

8.)  CRANE INTERNSHIP, Audubon Species Survival Center (SSC), Audubon Nature Institute, New Orleans, LA

http://www.osnabirds.org/Jobs/CRANE-INTERNSHIP.aspx

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

9.)  Insect Keeper Intern, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO

http://bit.ly/1auuO07

 

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Communications Manager, California Native Plant Society, Sacramento, California

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=371500008

 

2.)  Avian Field Assistants: migrant use of hardwood habitats, Old Dominion University, Virginia / Maryland

 

Employment Information

 

Are you interested in our migrant work in Virginia, Maryland or our long-term woodpecker work in California?

 

2013 Virginia / Maryland Field Work – Radar Analysis of Fall Migrant Habitat Use

 

Field assistants are needed for a new collaborative project using radar to examine migrant use of hardwood forest habitat during fall migration in Virginia and Maryland. Assistants will sample hardwood forests along the Atlantic Flyway to compare with radar assessments of bird use of these habitats.

 

The research involves sampling migrants by sight and sound in addition to assessments of habitat and food resources.

 

Must be highly motivated with the ability to identify Eastern migrants by sight and sound. An ability to identify common vegetation and insects of Virginia / Maryland is preferred. Assistants will be housed in one of three locations: Wakefield, VA; Wallops Island, VA; or Berlin, MD and will involve extensive travel to field sites each day (a vehicle is required, mileage will be reimbursed). Field work is rigorous and will involve hot, humid weather, including frequent encounters with biting arthropods.

 

Positions include a monthly stipend of $1,850 and up to $500 / month housing allowance. The positions will run from 7 August through 14 November, 2013.

 

I am also recruiting a graduate student to work on this project. See the radar page for more information.

 

Current Positions (Virginia / Maryland):

 

Fall 2013: 7 Aug to 14 Nov (1 position); Wakefield, VA – OPEN

 

Fall 2013: 7 Aug to 14 Nov (2 positions); Wallops Island, VA – OPEN

 

Fall 2013: 7 Aug to 14 Nov (2 positions); Berlin, MD – OPEN

 

http://www.ericlwalters.org/employment.htm

 

3.)  Executive Director, Seattle Audubon Society, Seattle, Washington

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=428900015

 

4.)  Outreach Specialist, Center for EcoTechnology, Northampton, Massachusetts

http://www.greatgreencareers.com/green-job/30816/Outreach-Specialist-Northampton

 

5.)  Park Ranger Assistant, Sacramento County, Sacramento, CA

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/sacramento/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=96398

 

6.)  Park Ranger, Lifeguards, booth and Grounds Maintenance, Saginaw County Parks, Saginaw, MI

http://www.indeed.com/cmp/Saginaw-County-Parks/jobs/Park-Ranger-467810d01e6f6c9e

 

7.)  PARK RANGER II (RESTRICTED), Hillsborough County, Tampa, FL

http://www.jobaps.com/hill/sup/BulPreview.asp?R1=C3925&R2=AA&R3=o24124

 

8.)  Full Time Ranger, The Wildlands Conservancy, Wind Wolves Preserve, California

http://www.greatgreencareers.com/green-job/30782/Full-Time-Ranger-Wind-Wolves-Preserve

 

9.)  Outdoor School – Instructor, REI, Fairfax, VA

https://www.rei.apply2jobs.com/HVExt/index.cfm?fuseaction=mHvexternal.showPositionDetails&pid=42&lid=319

 

10.)  Park Ranger, City of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/santabarbara/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=680070

 

11.)  Marketing and Communications Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., New York, NY

 

Now in its second century, Audubon is dedicated to protecting birds and other wildlife and the habitat that supports them. Audubon’s mission is engaging people in bird conservation on a hemispheric scale through science, policy, education and on-the-ground conservation action.  By mobilizing and aligning its network of Chapters, Centers, State and Important Bird Area programs in the four major migratory flyways in the Americas, the organization will bring the full power of Audubon to bear on protecting common and threatened bird species and the critical habitat they need to survive.  And as part of BirdLife International, Audubon will join people in over 100 in-country organizations all working to protect a network of Important Bird Areas around the world, leveraging the impact of actions they take at a local level.  What defines Audubon’s unique value is a powerful grassroots network of nearly 500 local chapters, 23 state offices, 43 Audubon Centers, Important Bird Area Programs in 46 states, and 700 staff across the country.  Audubon is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE).

 

Position Summary:

 

The Marketing and Communications Intern will have the opportunity to build connections among Audubon staff and supporters. The position will include creating polished donor and staff communication documents, as well as actively assisting in the development of external facing marketing and communications efforts both online and in print. This is a part-time, paid internship, working approximately 20 hours per week from August, 2013 through October, 2013. The position reports to the Marketing and Communications Coordinator.

 

Essential Functions:

 

The position will include:

•Assisting with writing, editing, and designing communications for print, email and web

•Collecting, editing, and managing photo assets

•Analytics and reporting

•Occasional administrative tasks

•Other activities as needed to support the marketing and communications team

 

Qualifications and Experience:

•Excellent writing and editing skills.

•Superior organizational skills; attention to detail a must.

•Polished and professional, confident in communication with executive leaders.

•Some experience designing for print (InDesign) and/or web (including HTML for web and HTML email) a plus

 

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1806/marketing-and-communications-intern/job

 

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

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Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
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Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for June 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for June 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.”

– T. S. Eliot

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

***  This edition of Your Very Next Step comes to you from the “Lion City,” Singapore.

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 591 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:
***  UAE and India

***  Singapore

***  Indigo hair

***  This is the place to stop for South Indian coffee in Bangalore, or that’s what they say.

***  This is the best biryani in Hyderabad

***  Breakfast in Bangalore:

***  This is South Indian fast food

***  Pyramid power

***  The Moxie Festival in Lisbon, Maine

***  Samoa Air says “Super-size me!”

***  Singapore’s Dragon Kilns

***  Avoid Wildlife Encounters this Summer

***  This is fascinating.  Before your flight, Etihad invites you to “bid” on an upgrade

***  Pitch A Tent

***  Emirates Airline to Open World’s First Indoor Aviation-Themed Attraction

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: June 2013

Iowa’s Trolley Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer and make a difference in Cusco, Peru! Peru Volunteer and Travel, Cusco, Peru / Sebastopol, CA

2.)  NPS Great Smokey Mountains Environmental Education Internship, American Conservation Experience, Cherokee, NC

3.)  Volunteer in the Cerrado/Atlantic Forest Paraguay, Para La Tierra Voluntary & Interns Paraguay, America South

4.)  Summer Camp Counselor & Adventure Guide, Mammoth Mountain, Mammoth Lakes, CA

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Adventure Center Attendant, Loon Mountain Resort, Lincoln, NH

2.)  Adventure Ridge Hiking Guide – Full Time – Summer 2013, Vail Resorts, Vail, CO

3.)  Adventure Guide, The Highland Center, Appalachian Mountain Club, Crawford Notch, NH

4.)  Social Media Coordinator, The Sportsman Channel, Inc., New Berlin, WI

5.)  Social Media Senior Specialist, Cabela’s, Denver, CO

6.)  Director of Marketing and Communications, Audubon Naturalist Society, Chevy Chase, Maryland

7.)  Fishing Guide, Xanterra Parks & Resorts (Authorized Concessioner of the National Park Service), Yellowstone Lake, Montana

8.)  Senior Manager, Media Outreach Strategy, Rainforest Alliance, New York, NY or London, UK

9.)  Adventure Trip Leader, YMCA, Putnam Valley, NY

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  UAE and India

 

I will relate my saga of the “Tier Status Match” with Etihad when the saga is complete.  Please stand by.

 

I called Etihad to ensure they had my TSA Pre Chek/CBP Global Entry number on my reservation.  I was unable to use Pre-Chek when leaving for Abu Dhabi, but there was no line so no big deal.  The return from overseas is where the Global Entry number would come in handy.  It all has to be on my record, and you can’t just show your card when you arrive.Anyway, calling Etihad was frustrating because the ticket agent didn’t know what I was talking about.

 

Dinner on Etihad was a very acceptable lamb biryani.  I opted for that instead of cajun chicken.  The flight attendant told me, “We don’t get  many Americans on this flight…mostly Indians.

 

The mid-flight goodies included caramel popcorn.

 

Fell asleep just after midnight EDT and woke up around 7:20 EDT, which was 3:20 p.m. in AUH.

So I definitely got some sleep.  That was  the good news.  The bad news is I might have had a hard time getting to sleep when I finally got to the hotel late in the evening.  As it turned out I grabbed something to eat and then slept for about four hours and so I was okay..

 

When leaving Abu Dhabi for India I took a cab to the airport.  I told the taxi driver terminal 1 A.  He dropped me at terminal 1.  He kept the change before I could get it from him.  No big deal.  I couldn’t find Air India, and must have looked lost, because I was finally guided to a series of level and course changes to get me out, down and around to an entrance modestly market  1A which had a line out into the taxi waiting area a mile long.  And not just a line, these were men headed home with several giant bundles for luggage for each of them.  Big bundles, lashed up with rope.  I had to go back outside to the end of the line.  But eventually it started to move, and I with it.  At some poiunt somebody came and got me and took me to the front of the line (I only had one rollerboard insstead of giant bundles.  I was also moved to a shorter line to get my ticket.  Everyone was amazed that I was going to Delhi on this flight.  My theory is the entire plane was booked by a labor broker(s) who were sending people home after working in the UAE for some time.  I went through passport control and headed to the gate, which was not yet open.  When I made my reservation there was nobody else, according to the seat assignment chart.  However, this plane was definitely full, and when I looked at my boarding pass I noticed that my seat waas changed from a window up front to something else somewhere in the back.  I was sitting in the terminal waiting for the gate to open when an Air India rep came to me to ask me what kind of meal I wanted: vehg or non-veg.  I told him that a non-vegetarian meal would be great (Me being a meat eater and all).  I mentioned to him that my seat assignment had changed, and he said that could be taken care of when the gate opened. But he returned a minute later with my new boarding pass in business class.

 

I’m offered juice.  Orange or grapes.  I choose grapes juice.

 

I theorize why the plane looked empty when I checked the seating chart when I booked my ticket:  the plane is full of guest workers returning home,  and the seats were probably booked in bulk by a broker.

 

The flight attendants are striking.  They’re wearing blank saris with a red, black and white pattern, and way more midriff than you’ll ever see on United–which is good on both counts.

 

The plane is all men, except for two women.  One travelling alone, and another with her husband and two very small children.  Myself and the women are in first class.  The husband wants to stay with his family but his told he must sit in his assigned seat in the back.  The flight attendants apologize, but they do not have the authority, they tell him.  He implorers them, and finally a gate agent goes off and comes back with approval to let the man sit next to his wwife, with one of the children on his lap.  Good call, Air India.

 

This A319 is painted in Indian Airlines livery.  Indian was the state-owned domestic airline and Air India the international airline of India.

 

Now its one company, and there several competitors.

 

I have the non-veg meal.  It’s lamb biryani (I think that’s what its called).  Pretty good until I have that green bean in the salad, only to find it’s actually a hot pepper.  Yowza.  There’s Sterile Brand yogurt…just like home made it says.  I never made yogurt at home.

 

***  Singapore:

 

I really like Singapore.  It’s neat, clean and safe.  It’s Asian and exotic with out the smells of smoke and sewage.  It reminds me of Hawaii.  In fact, Singapore is about half the size of Oahu in land area, and has more than five times as many people, almost 5.2 million.

 

***  Indigo hair

 

I flew Indigo Airlines recently.  Indigo is a low-cost carrier with new planes and a yoiuthful staff.  The flight attendants are attractive, but they all have a fem-bot similarity: same height, same outfit, same hat, same lipstick, same hair.  It’s sort of “Mad Men” retro look.  At first I thought it was just me, thinking I was watching a Robert Palmer music video, but they all looked the same.  I looked it up online and sure enough, the Indigo girls have to either cut and coif their hair just so, or wear a wig!

 

***  This is the place to stop for South Indian coffee in Bangalore, or that’s what they say.

 

Our guides for the afternoon were young and enthusiastic communications students: Anwar Hussein, Arpitha Jain and Deepthi Pandit.  They took us to the Gavi Gangadheeshwara Temple cave temple in Bangalore:

http://www.goplaces.in/blog/the-gavi-gangadhareshwara-cave-temple-in-bangalore/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hulimavu_cave_Temple

 

We also went to the Bull Temple, Dodda Basavana Gudi, dedicated to the sacred Hindu demi-god Nandi, located in the Bugle Rock gardens.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodda_Ganeshana_Gudi

 

Anwar, Arpitha and Deepthi then took Wilma, Susan and I to Brahmin’s Café.

 

We had idly (rice pancakes); vada (fried spicy donut); khara bhath (spicy semolina) and kesari bhath (sweet semolina).

http://bangalore.burrp.com/listing/brahmins-coffee-bar_sankarapuram_bangalore_fast-food-shops/110279099

 

***  This is the best biryani in Hyderabad:

http://www.paradisefoodcourt.com/

 

***  Breakfast in Bangalore:

http://adigas.in/

 

***  This is South Indian fast food.

 

My friend, Elizabeth, handed me a fried hot chili pepper to taste.  I thought she said to eat the whole thing.  I put the whole thing in my mouth and two women who were watch nearly died from shock.  If I could have captured the look on their faces.  One of them said “take it out!!”  Which I did, but then proceeded to eat the entire thing anyway.

 

Oh, yes, and they have these nifty burger thingies, too.

 

http://www.golivadapav.com/

 

***  Pyramid power

 

http://www.ishafoundation.org/Ishakriya?gclid=CL3eqoqI2LcCFYsF4godalQAMA

 

http://pyramidvalley.org/pyramid/Home/maitreyabuddhapyramid.htm

 

ttp://pyramidvalley.org/pyramid/home/aboutus.htm
http://pyramidvalley.org/pyramid/images/campus1_l.jpg

 

***  The Moxie Festival in Lisbon, Maine

 

2013 Moxie Festival Dates: July 12-14

 

Join Moxie lovers from Maine, the US and abroad at the one and only Moxie Festival.

 

Fireworks! Car Show! Pow-wow! Parade! 5K Run! Chief Worumbo Androscoggin River Race!

Concert in the Park!

 

http://moxiefestival.com/

 

***  Samoa Air says “Super-size me!”

 

The world’s first airline to charge people according to their weight is set to introduce an “executive row”, with extra space and no armrests, to cater for bigger passengers.

 

Samoa’s domestic airline Samoa Air made headlines this year when it introduced a pay-by-weight fare system.

 

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=10890196

 

***  Singapore’s Dragon Kilns

 

In the early 1980’s Singapore still had three Dragon Kilns, Sam Mui Kwang, Thow Kwang and Guan Huat. Today just two remain, and urbanization threaten them, too.

 

Although the dragon kilns are not ancient, they originated in China 2,000 years ago and brought to Singapore by Chinese immigrants in the early 1900s. At one time there were more than a dozen, which were used to make ceramic vessels to collect latex from rubber trees.

 

The Wood-fired dragon kiln looks like fire-breathing dragon with fire spewing from its nostrils. Although not used regularly any more, there is still a community of potters who have their studios there, and there have been occasions where the kilns have been used fairly recently in a limited capacity.

 

***  Avoid Wildlife Encounters this Summer

By Michele C. Hollow of Pet News and Views

http://petnewsandviews.com/2013/06/avoid-wildlife-encounters-this-summer

 

***  This is fascinating.  Before your flight, Etihad invites you to “bid” on an upgrade.  But believe me, there’s nothing here that comes cheap.

 

Dear EDWARD H LUNDQUIST,

 

Etihad Airways is delighted to inform you that the following segments of your upcoming flights are now eligible for an upgrade to the next higher cabin – Pearl Business Class *

 

Booking Reference: CBWYIV

FLIGHT DATE     FROM   TO          TIME

EY130    1 Jun ’13               Washington        Abu Dhabi           22:15

EY287    10 Jun ’13             Bangalore            Abu Dhabi           04:50

EY131    10 Jun ’13             Abu Dhabi           Washington        10:00

The flight information above is only for flights eligible for upgrade. For details of all your flights, please refer to your E ticket.

 

All you need to do to upgrade from Coral Economy Class is:

•             Make us an offer by clicking here

•             Enter your Payment Information

•             Review and Submit

If your offer has been accepted, you will receive a confirmation mail no later than 24 hours prior to departure along with your new E-ticket. Please note your credit card will be charged only if your bid is successful. For more details click here.

If you are not yet a member of our award-winning loyalty programme – Etihad Guest -why not join today by clicking here to enroll. As an Etihad Guest member, you can earn Etihad Guest Miles every time you fly with us or with our global partners. The Etihad Guest Miles can be redeemed against flights, upgrades or over 2900 products from our Reward Shop.

* Etihad chauffeur services will not be available for upgrades from Coral Economy Class to Pearl Business Class

 

Isn’t it time you upgraded with the best?

 

***  Pitch A Tent

 

Heading out with your new tent this Memorial Day weekend? Check out Campmor’s blog for some stress free tips on setting up your tent.

http://outdoors.campmor.com/how-to-pitch-a-tent-tips/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=TrailMail-May242013&cm_pla=50786&cm_ven=EMAIL&utm_campaign=TRAILMAIL&utm_medium=50786&utm_source=TrailMail-May242013

 

***  From Bernie Wagenblast’s TCN Newsletter:

Emirates Airline to Open World’s First Indoor Aviation-Themed Attraction

Link to article in Arabian Business:

http://www.arabianbusiness.com/emirates-open-world-s-first-aviation-attraction-504861.html

Link to news release: http://goo.gl/rJZoB

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: June 2013

Iowa’s Trolley Trail

By Laura Stark

 

“There are unique recreational opportunities in both towns and the trail allows access to both.”

 

From nostalgic train buffs to cherubic Thomas the Tank Engine aficionados, the Trolley Trail in north-central Iowa has something for everyone. Although only six miles long, there are so many nearby attractions that a visitor could easily make a day trip out of it.

 

Brian Pauly, superintendent of recreation for Mason City, lives four blocks from the Trolley Trail. “It’s a great trail that links Mason City and Clear Lake,” he says. “There are unique recreational opportunities in both towns and the trail allows access to both.”

 

The trail gets its name from the trolley line it parallels that began shuttling passengers between the two towns in 1897. Although it stopped carrying passengers in 1936, the Iowa Traction Railway continues to ship cargo. “It’s the last electric freight railroad in North America,” says Michael Johns, the general manager for the Iowa Traction Railway.

 

“It works the industries on the west side of Mason City,” says Dennis Wilson, chairman of the Friends of the 457, a local volunteer group. “A lot of people come and photograph it.”

 

Trains run several times a week, but when asked if they posed a risk for trail-goers, Johns says there are no safety concerns. This comes as no surprise to Kelly Pack, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy trail development director and the lead author of a new report on rail-with-trail projects like this one.

 

“It’s been more than a decade since the last rail-with-trail report and we’ve seen a substantial growth in rail-with-trails around the country,” says Pack. “And they continue to have an excellent safety record.” The new report, anticipated to come out in July, will provide examples of rail-with-trail projects of varying lengths and styles, as well as updated technical resources and contacts for the trail-building community.

 

Before the Trolley Trail was built, the danger for bicyclists and walkers in the community wasn’t trains—it was cars. Precipitating the push for the trail in 1988 was a tragic accident in which a teenager was killed as he was biking along the road between Mason City and Clear Lake. When the Trolley Trail was opened to the public in 1990, it was a welcome addition to the surrounding communities. Efforts now center on making more of these essential connections.

 

“Our goal is to make Mason City a bikeable and walkable user-friendly community,” says Bill Stangler, the city’s operations and maintenance manager. “We have a number of trails, but they just start and end. The concept is to link everything together.” Mason City is also working on a Complete Streets initiative.”

 

Long ago, Mason City sported a transportation network of another kind: railroads. “Mason City was a railroad hub a hundred years ago,” says Johns. “At least five big railroads were in town.”

 

An unusual remnant of this industrial past is Big Blue, an old quarry pit at the east end of the Trolley Trail that naturally filled with water over the years and is now a recreational hot spot, especially for fishing. Scuba divers that venture into its 80-foot depths can still see old mining equipment.

 

Less than two miles from Big Blue is a reminder of the town’s more elegant past. Last year, Condé Nast Traveler named Mason City one of the World’s Best Cities for Architecture Lovers, due to the large collection of “Prairie School” buildings in the community. This style of architecture, designed to be reminiscent of expansive prairie landscapes, was made famous by Frank Lloyd Wright, himself a Midwesterner, who lived in Mason City in the early 20th century. Wright’s Stockman House, constructed in 1908, is now an interpretative center and can be toured. A few blocks away the Historic Park Inn Hotel, the last remaining hotel that he designed, is also worth a visit.

 

Another mile east from here is East Park, which Pauly calls “a gem of the community.” Here, the Friends of the 457 are bringing a Minneapolis and St. Louis Railroad steam engine back to its original 1912 look. Although the restoration is purely cosmetic, the engine gives the appearance of running courtesy of a strategically placed fogger in its smokestack and a CD of steam-engine sound that’s played during demonstrations.

 

A local Rotary Club had started the project back in the 1950s and, after starts and stops, the restoration is now nearly complete. In 1959 the engine was dubbed “Cannonball” in a naming contest run by the local newspaper; the winner: an 8-year-old girl who spent her $25 earnings on a new puppy.

 

Over the past 10 years, the community has been incredibly supportive of the project. The display has been closed since last August, so that volunteers could work on repairing the engine’s boiler jacket—the final piece of the restoration—and “every day they’re asking, ‘when are you going to be done?'” says Wilson. He hopes the answer is June 29, when the Friends of the 457 hosts its annual Cannonball Day. As their website proclaims, the event is for anyone that loves trains and will include a children’s fun run, live music, talent contest, and chicken barbecue.

 

At the trail’s opposite end lies Trolley Park, where another group of volunteers offers rides on a diesel locomotive around a short track as part of a private, educational museum. The big engine is especially popular with children. “When we get six-year-olds, they think they’ve died and gone to heaven,” says Stan Gentry, president of the Mason City and Clear Lake Electric Railroad Historical Society.

 

But teaching railroad history to young crowds is not always easy, as Gentry explains: “When kids come, their minds go everywhere. Sometimes you’ll have 15 seconds, sometimes 15 minutes, so you go with the flow.”

 

In addition to the working diesel engine, the group is building a replica of an 1869 wood-burning steam locomotive. When completed next year, it will be a Victorian beauty in dark green and bright red with shiny brass and gold-leaf trimmings. An old handcar (like the kind Wile E. Coyote used to chase down the Road Runner) can also be pumped down the track. Gentry jokes that this ride is more popular with the hardier bicycle crowd.

 

From here, reaching Clear Lake itself is an easy journey of less than two miles. “Once you get off the trail, follow Main Avenue west, and you run right into the lake,” says Libbey Patton, director of tourism for the Clear Lake Chamber of Commerce. Forged by glaciers, such a naturally made lake is unusual for the state and has helped propel the city into a tourist hub with visitors flocking here during the summer months.

 

“We got a bike rental program going last year because so many people came to town and wanted to ride bikes,” says Patton. Available at the lake’s visitor center, the rentals are a beach cruiser style to “fit the theme of the town,” says Patton.

 

Less than a mile north of the visitor center is the Surf Ballroom, a rock-n-roll landmark and museum where Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and The Big Bopper gave their last concert before their tragic deaths in a plane crash. Concerts still play in the dancehall that sports a gleaming hardwood floor, a stage hugged by palm trees, and 50s-style diner booths.

 

The Trolley Trail already joins two great towns, Clear Lake and Mason City. In the future, more communities will be hooked into the network once plans develop for an as yet unnamed rail-trail along a corridor purchased from Union Pacific Railroad. Although salvage work has been completed, the corridor has 19 bridges that need to be redecked and railed.

 

“Our agency has a rail bed in the southwest corner of Mason City extending down through the county to Thornton,” says Fred Heinz, director of the Cerro Gordo County Conservation Board, which manages the Trolley Trail and other public areas throughout the county. “It’s 21 miles. Now we just need the funding to create it. It’s a big undertaking.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Volunteer and make a difference in Cusco, Peru! Peru Volunteer and Travel, Cusco, Peru / Sebastopol, CA

http://www.peruvolunteerandtravel.com/en/volunteer-programs/cusco

 

2.)  NPS Great Smokey Mountains Environmental Education Internship, American Conservation Experience, Cherokee, NC

http://usaconservationepic.applicantpool.com/jobs/1750-3873.html

 

3.)  Volunteer in the Cerrado/Atlantic Forest Paraguay, Para La Tierra Voluntary & Interns Paraguay, America South

http://www.environmentjobs.com/green-jobs/volunteer-in-the-cerradoatlantic-forest-paraguay.9538.htm

 

4.)  Summer Camp Counselor & Adventure Guide, Mammoth Mountain, Mammoth Lakes, CA

http://jobs.mammothmountain.com/season/jobdetail.cfm?opening_id=3156

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Adventure Center Attendant, Loon Mountain Resort, Lincoln, NH

http://loonmtn.com/info/winter/JobDetails.aspx?page=/collagepages/Jobs/Adventure_Center_Att.aspx.xml

 

2.)  Adventure Ridge Hiking Guide – Full Time – Summer 2013, Vail Resorts, Vail, CO

https://career4.successfactors.com/career?career_ns=job_listing&company=Vail&navBarLevel=JOB_SEARCH&rcm_site_locale=en_US&career_job_req_id=33026

 

3.)  Adventure Guide, The Highland Center, Appalachian Mountain Club, Crawford Notch, NH

 

The Adventure Guide is responsible for the delivery of all Highland Center programs and activities as well as other specialty programs at AMC destinations.  The Adventure Guide will act as an interpretive and informational resource to guests at the Highland Center, providing high-quality customer service during non-program times. The Adventure Guide will report to the Adventure Programs Manager and work with fellow staff and volunteers to develop and implement high quality educational and recreational programs for guests and visitors.

 

Job Responsibilities

Deliver outdoor and indoor education and/or recreation related programs in and around the Highland Center throughout the day, on topics ranging from natural and cultural history to backcountry safety and resource conservation.

• Lead outdoor programs, including but not limited to: ½ day to full day and overnight hikes in the area in all types of weather.

• Deliver special programs, including but not limited to:

• New member weekends and other themed weekends at the Highland Center.

• 50+ senior program weeks.

• Family Adventure Camps (full week and weekend).

• Holiday week premium programming during holiday vacation weeks.

• Day long and multi-day overnight trips in the backcountry for groups.

• Interpretive programs at the Bretton Woods Resort.

• Teambuilding programs for groups

• Outdoor skills programs including: map & compass, orienteering, camping, firemaking, and Leave No Trace.

• Winter-specific programs including: Nordic ski clinics & tours, snowshoe clinics & tours, and winter camping/survival.

• Deliver short informative presentations daily to guests at breakfast and dinner.

• Assist in developing and maintaining passive educational materials, including program manuals, on-site libraries and games, self guided activities, posters and displays.

• Act as an interpretive resource for guests, visitors, volunteers, and staff when on duty.

• Prepare and submit all program reports and assignments as instructed.

• Cross-train in order to support other departments at the Highland Center, including front desk staff.

• Perform all other duties within the AMC as assigned.

 

Employment Standards

At least 2 years of related program leading experience, including solid backcountry skills and experience, and demonstrated ability to lead groups in the outdoors.

• Practical and academic background in environmental education, natural history, or recreation is required.

• Certification in WFA is required; WFR is preferred.

• Ability to develop and lead all programs at all AMC destinations is required.

• Physical ability to travel to all AMC destinations in all weather conditions is required, carrying loads of up to 40 pounds in a backpack, hiking on unimproved trails.

• Strong organizational and written/verbal communication skills.

• Excellent guest service skills and a demonstrated commitment to AMC goals.

• Willingness to work weekends, holidays, and evenings.

• Must be over 18 years old, preferably 21 (to comply with driving standards). Must hold valid driver s license and be able to pass a DOT medical exam.

• Safe driving record and practices, as verified through a driving history record check.

• AMC has zero tolerance for the abuse of children. Any employee or intern with access to children will have a criminal record check performed and have references checked regarding their past work with children.

 

Compensation

The Adventure Guide is a full-time seasonal position. Pay starts at $9.50/hour. On-site housing is available for seasonal

 

https://apply.coolworks.com/amc/job-details.asp?JobID=22846

 

***  From Jeff Carrigan:

 

4.)  Social Media Coordinator, The Sportsman Channel, Inc., New Berlin, WI

 

Organization Profile

Launched in 2003, Sportsman Channel is the only television and digital media company fully devoted to the more than 82 million sportsmen in the United States, delivering entertaining and educational programming focused exclusively on hunting, shooting and fishing activities. Sportsman Channel is now available in HD, check with your local cable or satellite provider. Acquired by InterMedia Outdoors Holdings in 2006, Sportsman Channel reaches more than 31.2 million U.S. television households and is a part of the nation’s largest multimedia company targeted exclusively to serving the information and entertainment needs of outdoors enthusiasts. Visit www.thesportsmanchannel.com, follow on Twitter, @SPORTSMANchnl (www.twitter.com/SPORTSMANchnl), become a Fan on Facebook, www.facebook.com/sportsmanchannel and download Sportsman App at www.itunes.com/appstore.

 

Job Overview

Sportsman Channel, the leader in outdoor programming for the American Sportsman, is seeking a Social Media Coordinator. The individual in this position is responsible for executing the company’s social media strategy, developing brand awareness, generating web traffic and coordinating content for all social/mobile platforms.

 

Job Description

Responsibilities:

•Implement Sportsman Channel’s social media strategy while coordinating with all internal departments on marketing and sales obligations, company-wide initiatives and the promotion of the linear channel.

•Coordinate Sportsman’s presence and day-to-day activities on social networking sites including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and other similar community sites, as well as manage the content on our company blog.

•Coordinate and manage all social media advertising while providing detailed reports, analysis and executive summaries to each department of the company.

•Monitor effective benchmarks for measuring the impact of social media programs, and analyze, review, and report on effectiveness of campaigns in an effort to maximize results.

•Manage and respond to all questions, comments and requests on all social media accounts.

•Coordinate content and marketing initiatives with show producers, clients, and other partners.

•Keep the marketing and digital services departments updated on new trends, applications and advancements in social media.

•Perform all other duties that may be assigned to meet business needs.

 

Job Qualifications

Education and Experience:

•Bachelor’s Degree in a marketing, communications or related field. 2+ years of experience working with social media.

•Excellent verbal and written communications skills are required.

•High level of attention to detail.

•Proficiency in Photoshop, and basic knowledge of web design and HTML coding.

•Some video editing experience using Final Cut is a plus.

•Demonstrated ability to work independently as well as with a team in a fast-paced environment and produce under tight deadlines with multiple priorities.

•Proven track record of social media success on platforms such as YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Google +, Instagram, Pinterest and track record of building and maintaining communities and blogger relationships.

•Basic knowledge and experience in hunting, shooting and fishing is required.

 

Compensation & Benefits

We offer a competitive compensation and benefits package.

 

How To Apply

Qualified candidates should submit letter of interest with salary expectations and resume in confidence via email or fax. Please indicate the title of the position for which you are applying.

 

Mail: Sportsman Channel, Inc. ATTN: Director, Human Resources, 2855 South James Drive, Suite 101, New Berlin, Wisconsin 53151

 

Email: hr@thesportsmanchannel.com

Fax: (262) 432.9138

 

To learn more about The Sportsman Channel, please visit us at www.thesportsmanchannel.com and facebook.com/sportsmanchannel. Due to the volume of resumes we receive, we can only contact the most qualified candidates. We appreciate your consideration. We conduct background checks on all final candidates being considered for employment.

 

http://www.bigshoesnetwork.com/find_job_details.aspx?id=7255

 

***  From Andrew Hudson’s Job List:

 

5.)  Social Media Senior Specialist, Cabela’s, Denver, CO

 

Do you want to work for the leader in the outdoor industry? Then apply today to join the Cabela’s team. Cabela’s has an opening for a Social Media Senior Specialist in the E-Commerce department in Denver, Co

 

JOB DESCRIPTION:

 

The Social Media SR Specialist will work within the Social Media team to execute the day to day activities within the Cabela’s Social Media programs. This position will be responsible for the execution of Social Media specific content and campaigns as determined by the Social Media strategy and the needs of the business and will communicate and inform the overall social media strategy with feedback from day to day interactions with customers via social media. Working closely with other marketing programs, the Social Media SR Specialist works to maximize Cabela’s engagement and reach with its customer base via social media marketing. This position will be a key voice of Cabela’s as it crafts and communicates posts, content and responses to customer interactions with the Cabela’s brand. Building and communicating regular reporting of program specific KPI’s and representing Social Media in omni, category and digital commerce planning will also be critical to success. The Social Media SR Specialist will also be an evangelist for social media in key tactical marketing meetings. The SR Specialist works closely with cross functional teams including Digital Commerce, Design, Brand Marketing, Retail Marketing and more. This position is a key contact for the day to day relationships with Cabela’s customers and our agency partners.

 

KEY DUTIES:

 

Execute against the Social Media strategy, coordinating with stakeholders across all channels of Cabela’s to ensure its effectiveness and maximizing customer engagement and reach.

Build and execute Social Media content and campaigns and related day-to-day activities including monitoring on and off network social media activity, crafting and posting content and commentary as well as responding directly to customer feedback and communicating to other internal departments where necessary.

Work with all other marketing teams, merchandising teams and business units to ensure Social Media programs are fully integrated with all related marketing and merchandising activity to drive maximum customer engagement and reach..

Monitor and communicate performance against effective benchmarks for measuring the impact of Social media. Analyze, review, and report on effectiveness of Social Media efforts in order to maximize results.

 

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:

 

Bachelor’s degree with 2-4+ years of experience

Experience working with social media for B2C businesses. Knowledge, experience and understanding of the digital media space. Experience and knowledge of social media platforms, successful communication strategies and paid marketing opportunities within social med. Experience and knowledge of other online marketing programs.

 

Cabela’s is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and we seek to create an inclusive work place that embraces diverse backgrounds, life experiences and perspectives.

 

Cabela’s offers a competitive benefits package to include: 401k, vacation, profit sharing, health and dental coverage for you and your family, relocation assistance, and employee discounts.

 

https://sjobs.brassring.com/tgwebhost/jobdetails.aspx?jobId=908601

 

6.)  Director of Marketing and Communications, Audubon Naturalist Society, Chevy Chase, Maryland

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=423100010

 

7.)  Fishing Guide, Xanterra Parks & Resorts (Authorized Concessioner of the National Park Service), Yellowstone Lake, Montana

 

About the Job…

 

The Fishing Guides pilot watercraft and host fishing excursions for Yellowstone guests; safely navigating Yellowstone Lake waters while offering fishing technique instruction and interpretive information to participants. This position requires solid knowledge of fishing in fresh water, the ability to operate small and midsize watercraft on one of North America’s largest high-altitude lakes during a variety of weather conditions, while providing knowledgeable, interpretive commentary of Park features and history. Our Guides must enjoy spending time with multiple guests in conditions that require excellent teaching, communication and guest service skills.

 

Uniform for this position is provided by the company. The employee must provide proper footwear for marina and boating environments.

 

REPORTING RELATIONSHIPS:

 

Reports directly to the Marina Manager.

 

RESPONSIBILITIES:

•Operates assigned charter boat in lawful manner.

•Conducts guided trips on Yellowstone Lake aboard assigned boat.

•Provides customers with services requested according to Company policy.

•Instructs customers in fishing techniques and usage of equipment.

•Advises customers regarding fishing regulations.

•Secures and maintains assigned boats including: fueling cleaning and identifying maintenance issues.

•Instruct guests on emergency procedures, basic boating safety and radio usage.

•Assists in the scenic cruise operations as assigned.

•Assists in the rental boat operation as assigned.

•Completes required paperwork.

•Must provide fishing equipment to simultaneously outfit a minimum of three guests.

•Must provide appropriate clothing to work outdoors in varying weather conditions.

•Performs other duties as assigned.

 

SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE:

•Basic seamanship skills, must pass written and practical examinations.

•Knowledge of NPS boating and fishing regulations.

•Must be able to instruct guests in fishing techniques to ensure the maximum possibility of success.

•Communication skills

•Knowledge of park geography and history with a focus on the Lake area.

•Knowledge of rules and procedures for use of marine band radio.

•Knowledge of safety, emergency and life-saving procedures.

•Must possess a current CPR and first aid certification.

•Knowledge of local weather patterns.

•Knowledge of department and Company policies and procedures.

 

PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS:

•Must provide proof of Medical Examination stating fitness for holding a commercial boat operators position.

•Must be capable of lifting objects of up to 50 pounds.

•Must be capable of bending, lifting and standing throughout a 10-hour shift.

•Must be able to work outdoors in varying weather conditions for extended periods of time.

•Must be able to work at elevations in excess of 7700 feet.

 

AUTHORITIES:

•Authority to make decisions regarding the vessel and passengers to ensure the safety of passengers and vessel.

•Regulate activities of customers while under way, to ensure the safety of passengers and vessel.

•Report problems to Marina Manager or Assistant Manager.

http://www.yellowstonejobs.com/Fishing-Guide-7852.html

 

8.)  Senior Manager, Media Outreach Strategy, Rainforest Alliance, New York, NY or London, UK

 

The Rainforest Alliance is an international nonprofit organization that works to conserve biodiversity and ensure sustainable livelihoods by transforming land-use practices, business practices and consumer behaviour. Based in New York City, with offices throughout the United States and worldwide, the Rainforest Alliance works with people whose livelihoods depend on the land, helping them transform the way they grow food, harvest wood and host travelers.

 

Position Summary:

 

Based in London or New York City, the Senior Manager, Media Outreach Strategy will be responsible for developing and overseeing strategies for the effective use of creative content aimed at increasing awareness of the Rainforest Alliance’s mission and work among the organization’s wide-ranging stakeholders worldwide. S/he will guide and collaborate with colleagues, businesses, NGOs, government representatives, journalists and others to ensure that they have the tools and information necessary to promote and inform their audiences about the organization’s achievements.

 

Responsibilities:

 

•Drive media outreach and other promotional strategies for the organization as a whole and for specific targeted audiences in order to meet programmatic objectives;

•Track media developments and trends, cultivating new media relationships where appropriate and continually seeking out promotional vehicles and opportunities;

•Collaborate closely with staff and representatives working with media in other countries to ensure efforts and messages are consistent;

•Position key Rainforest Alliance staff members as spokespeople and to promote organizational thought leadership;

•Prepare for and orchestrate responses to media crisis;

•Analyze effectiveness of the communications tools used by the organization; and

•Other duties as assigned.

 

Qualifications:

 

•Bachelor’s degree in Communications or Journalism;

•10 years’ experience in journalism, public relations, or nonprofit, government or business communications;

•Proven track record in strategic media outreach and marketing work;

•Strong project management and organizational skills;

•Experience in managing staff;

•Demonstrated interest in conservation, corporate social responsibility and/or international development issues;

•Superior written, verbal, organizational, analytical and interpersonal skills;

•Flexibility and willingness to work independently on a wide range of tasks and projects;

•Proven ability to prioritize tasks and work efficiently in a fast-paced environment; and

•Written and verbal proficiency in a foreign language preferred.

 

Salary: Commensurate with experience. Competitive benefits package provided

The Rainforest Alliance is an equal opportunity employer.

 

Application Instructions

 

Send resume, cover letter and salary history to Human Resources, Rainforest Alliance, 233 Broadway, 28th Floor, New York, NY 10279; Fax: 212-677-2187; E-mail: Personnel@ra.org. If emailing, use the following format in the subject line: first name and last name, job title and position you are applying for.

 

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=397100014

 

9.)  Adventure Trip Leader, YMCA, Putnam Valley, NY

http://www.ymca.net/career-opportunities/camp-positions.html?key=3313

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

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Your Very Next Step newsletter for May 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for May 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Me thinks that the moment my legs begin to move, my thoughts begin to flow.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

***  This edition of Your Very Next Step comes to you from Auburndale, Massachusetts ,

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 591 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:
***  Ned, the Alien’s have landed!

***  When an aircraft goes into a stall…

*** Hiking 101: Stay safe in the sun

***  20 Best Hotel Pools Around the World

***  CampMor’s OUTDOOR SOCKS 101

***  New airline fees that will make you hot

***  National Trails Day

***  Fight Comic

***  Singapore’s DRAGON BOAT RACES

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: May 2013

Virginia’s Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Nicodemus Wilderness Project , Help Save Our Environment & Wildlife, SIOUX FALLS,  SD

2.)  Volunteering with Adventure program, Plan My Volunteering PVN Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal

3.)  Excavating Another Dinosaur, Williams Spring Archeological Dig,  Passport in Time Program, Medicine Bow-Routt NF, near Newcastle, SD

4.)  Wilderness Ranger (BWCAW),  Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, Ely, MN

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Sonoma Youth Ecology Corps Crew Leader, Conservation Corps North Bay, Cotati, California

2.)  Outreach & Public Relations Coordinator, Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation, Camp Hill, PA

3.)  Kayaking & Snorkeling Guide, La Jolla Sea Cave Kayaks, La Jolla, CA

4.)  Event Intern- US Open of Surfing (Summer 2013), IMG, Los Angeles, CA

5.)  Paddleboard Instructor, SUP Iowa, Inc, Okoboji, IA

6.)  Alligator/Zebra Handler and Photographer, Wild Florida, Saint Cloud, FL

7.)  Boat Washer/Dock Master, Freedom Boat Club, Palmetto, FL

8.)  Director of Education, Audubon Canyon Ranch, Glen Ellen, California

9.)  Administrative Assistant, Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation, Philadelphia, PA

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned, the Alien’s have landed!

 

Hi Ned,

 

Here’s a destination you may want to keep an eye on for a future visit or “Your Very Next Step” mention. Aurora, Texas is trying to get a UFO festival off the ground and the “alien” mascot is named Ned.

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Texas-Roswell-considers-exploiting-alien-visit-4488887.php (I’ll send you the full print version via snail mail.)

 

Thanks for your continued dedication to producing JOTW. I recommend it to anyone who wants to see what’s going on in the communications job market, even if they’re happily employed at the moment. Who knows, there might be an even happier match among the listings. (The alternative selection writer-comedian job #56 looks kind of interesting, doesn’t it?)

 

Cheers,

 

Susan

 

Susan H. Burnell, APR

Imagination Ink – Business Writing & Public Relations

Houston, TX

 

***  Singapore:

 

I really like Singapore.  It’s neat, clean and safe.  It’s Asian and exotic with out the smells of smoke and sewage.  It reminds me of Hawaii.  In fact, Singapore is about half the size of Oahu in land area, and has more than five times as many people, almost 5.2 million.

 

***  It’s hard to explain what happens when an aircraft goes into a stall.  This shows you.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=c32_1367332518

 

*** From the American Hiking Society:

 

Hiking 101: Stay safe in the sun

While most of us enjoy warm, sunny days, we also need to be careful about the time we spend in the sun. Roughly 20% of Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime but there are many things each of us can do to help prevent this.

When enjoying a sunny hike, be sure to:

•             Limit time in the midday sun;

•             Use SPF15 or higher sunscreen; apply 15 minutes before going outside;

•             Wear a hat and cover up;

•             Wear sunglasses that block UV rays; and

•             Be aware of your local UV index.

For more information on sun safety visit the Environmental Protection Agency’s page about being Sun Wise.

 

http://www2.epa.gov/sunwise

 

***  20 Best Hotel Pools Around the World

 

This pops up every few years…but there are some new ones on this list:

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/20-best-hotel-pools-in-the-world?ref=news_fd_051113

 

***  CampMor’s OUTDOOR SOCKS 101

http://outdoors.campmor.com/outdoor-socks-101/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=TrailMail-April262013&cm_pla=51330

 

***  I’ll be looking for the Singapore Dragon Boat Regatta, which starts this wekend in Marina Bay.

 

DBS MARINA REGATTA – DRAGON BOAT RACES

 

18 & 19 May

 

Expect lots of action in the waters as close to 140 international and local teams, including the national teams from Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines and Singapore, paddle it out.

 

The 200m races will be held on 18 May and 500m races on 19 May. The overall winners of the eight categories will walk away with SGD 195,000 in total cash prizes, the highest prize monies for a dragon boat race!

 

Also, don’t forget to check out the Cosplay Festival and Drum Challenge at the Regatta Village between races as you soak in the atmosphere and join in the fun along the Waterfront Promenade!

 

http://www.dbsmarinaregatta.com/index.html

 

***  I was going to send you this newsletter just before I left Singapore on Sunday, but my visit to the Dragon Kiln couldn’t be shared in enough detail, so I have put that off until next issue.  I’ll send you the May issue today.

 

***  I attended “Fight Comic” at The Basement on the campus of Singapore Management University on May 17th with Phillip Raskin and GF Kim.

 

http://www.meetup.com/Singapore-Fun-Events/events/119104702/

http://www.timeoutsingapore.com/performance/comedy/fight-comic

 

***  National Trails Day

 

On June 1st, thousands of outdoor recreation activities are happening in every US State.  So don your favorite pair of boots, grab some friends and hit the trail.  Events include hikes, bike rides, paddling trips, horseback rides, stewardship projects and more.

 

http://www.americanhiking.org/ntd-events/

 

***  Just in time for summer: New airline fees that will make you hot

 

By Michelle Singletary

 

It’s not even summertime, but you may get hot and bothered by a slew of new airline fees.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/just-in-time-for-summer-new-airline-fees-that-will-make-you-hot/2013/05/16/0f51f052-bd97-11e2-97d4-a479289a31f9_story.html

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: May 2013

Virginia’s Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail

By Laura Stark

“The trail brings a lot of economic benefit to the town — [Tourists] come to do the Creeper, then come in to do other things in town.”

Bicycling 68 miles in a day would be an accomplishment for most people. But doing it nearly every day is a testament to endurance and willpower. At 81 years of age, it seems an impossibility. Meet Lawrence the Legend. On any day of the week, you’re likely to see Lawrence Dye, a slender man with big glasses, pedaling along the Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail on a bike that he says has been “a great friend.” Often dressed in bright yellow, Dye is hard to miss. He’s traveled the trail’s length—34 miles—roundtrip several times a week for more than 20 years, racking up over 175,000 miles.

 

“The trail is a huge part of Lawrence’s life,” says Beth Merz, area ranger for Mount Rogers National Recreation Area, a portion of which the trail runs through. “He’s one of those folks that actually goes up the mountain.”

 

The mountain Merz is referring to is Whitetop, part of the Blue Ridge range in southwestern Virginia. At nearly 3,600 feet, it’s the high point of the Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail and is thought to be the genesis of the Virginia Creeper nickname for the railroad, because the trains had to creep up the slope. The moniker was also a nod to the vine of the same name prevalent in the region.

 

“The train climbed up the shoulder of Whitetop Mountain,” says Wayne Miller, president of the Virginia Creeper Trail Club. “There are stories about its slowness. As it climbed up that steep grade, you could almost get out and walk alongside it.”

 

To avoid the challenging climb, many visitors to the rail-trail park at Damascus, a lower point on the trail, ferry their bicycles on a shuttle up to Whitetop Station (a replica depot and visitor center) and coast back down to their cars. The trail continues on to Abingdon, but this 17-mile eastern leg, managed by the U.S. Forest Service, is one of its most popular sections.

 

“I think the main reason they come in the numbers that they do is because it’s pretty simple,” says Kevin Costello, director of tourism for the Abingdon Convention and Visitors Bureau. “There are eight outfitters to choose from that take visitors up to Whitetop. It’s the user-friendliness that makes it so popular.”

 

The Virginia Creeper – officially Norfolk & Western (N&W) Railway – extracted resources, primarily lumber, out of the region in the early 1900s. It also carried iron ore, passengers, and mail. Three miles west of Whitetop lies a remnant of this railroad era.

 

“Green Cove is the real deal,” says Merz. “It’s the oldest station on the trail and was the center of the community. Green Cove Station was a post office, general store, and cargo location. There are artifacts on display — like the original mail boxes — and it frequently features photography exhibits or live music from local groups. It’s quite an attraction.”

 

The trail is heavily used from Memorial Day to Labor Day, but the variety of leafy trees along it — maple, birch, oak, beech, and poplars — wow visitors in the fall and push the trail’s peak usage to October.

 

At its midpoint is Damascus, aptly nicknamed “Trail Town, USA” for its convergence of several trails, including the Creeper. The famed Appalachian Trail, stretching more than 2,000 miles from Georgia to Maine, runs down Main Street. Last year, Budget Travel named it one of the “Coolest Small Towns in America,” specifically citing the community’s welcoming trail culture.

 

“Damascus is a little mill town that was saved by the trail,” says Miller. “It was on its last legs. The old industries were shutting down. Now it supports eight bike shops that service the trail.”

 

This month, the town of less than a thousand is about to get a whole lot bigger. Trail Days is coming, and with it a twentyfold increase in the town’s population.

 

“Trail Days is centered around the Appalachian Trail,” says Aaron Sizemore, Damascus town manager. “Lots of catching up goes on during Trail Days. It’s a reunion for hikers past and present. The first part of week, they trickle in. By Wednesday, they’re coming from out of town, bringing tents, and the town is packed; around 20,000 come.”

 

This time of year is also one of the prettiest. “In the spring, you’ll see mountain laurel and rhododendron blooming along the trail,” says Merz. “Down below trestle number 21, you’re just riding through white and pink beds. The mountain laurels are thick along there.”

 

There are so many trestles along the route that each is numbered with an identifying plaque at either end of the bridge. Originally, there were more than 100 along the railroad over the region’s web of picturesque creeks and rivers; 47 trestles remain on the rail-trail today. Some are quite short, less than 100 feet long, but the longest are more than 600 feet.

 

In contrast to its heavily wooded eastern end, the section between Damascus and Abingdon is much more open and pastoral. Here, the trail flattens out, breaking from the wilderness into farmland and more populated areas.

 

Long ago, Abingdon was known by a different name. The story goes that when famous frontiersman Daniel Boone hunted here in the fall of 1760, a pack of wolves came out of their lair and attacked his dogs. He named the area Wolf Hills, which stuck until Black’s Fort was built in 1774. Today, Costello calls Abington “a touristy town” and rightly so; the town is rich with attractions, including Barter Theater, one of the longest running theaters in the country; Martha Washington Inn, a women’s college in the 1850s and later a Civil War hospital; and a 20-block historic district.

 

Mollie, an N&W steam engine dating back to 1907, sits adjacent to the Creeper trailhead on a small band of track. Her smaller-than-standard size made her more nimble for the railroad’s steep terrain, sharp curves, and wooden trestles that couldn’t support a heavier engine’s weight. And the work of O. Winston Link, who captured classic images of the N&W trains in the 1950s, is on display in the Abingdon station. One of the biggest draws is the rail-trail itself, which ends just south of Main Street near the center of town.

 

“The trail brings a lot of economic benefit to the town,” says Kevin Worley, director of Abingdon’s parks and recreation department. “We average 250,000 annually using the trail. It’s a popular destination point. They come to do the Creeper, then come in to do other things in town.”

 

The trail is also the catalyst for a new way of thinking. “We have a new urban pathway project to connect sidewalks and create linkages that steer more people to the trail,” says Costello. “People are embracing being able to ride a bike more often. The trail has inspired that type of philosophy in town.”

 

But it wasn’t always this beloved. When it was first suggested that a trail be built in the railroad’s place, adjacent landowners put up a fight. It was 1977, the year the trains stopped running. Inspired by the burgeoning rail-trail movement, Dave Brillhart and French Moore, Jr., members of the Washington County Planning Commission at the time, proposed the idea.

 

“When word got out that we were wanting to make a trail out of it, well, all these people that lived out there, they were just furious with me and anybody who talked about it,” recalls Moore in a 2009 interview. “They were so mad about it.”

 

At first, opponents put baled hay, downed trees, and locked gates across the trail to block its use. One of its trestles was even burned.

 

“People thought: ‘We don’t want trashy people in our backyard,'” says Miller. “Once the trail was declared nonmotorized, they realized that responsible people were using it and the trail could bring in sustainable tourism. Slowly people came around.”

 

“The trail is our economic engine,” says Sizemore. “It’s the biggest one we’ve got. It’s the thing that keeps us going.”

 

Many regional events, which boost tourism in the area, feature trail activities. Coming up in early August, the weeklong Virginia Highlands Festival, celebrating Appalachian arts and crafts, offers a chance to meet the soft-spoken and beloved local celebrity Lawrence Dye in the annual Ride with the Legend outing on the Virginia Creeper Trail.

 

When asked what his favorite part of the trail is, Dye responds, “I love all of it. The trail is just a beautiful place to be.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Nicodemus Wilderness Project , Help Save Our Environment & Wildlife, SIOUX FALLS,  SD

http://www.volunteermatch.org/search/opp316870.jsp

 

2.)  Volunteering with Adventure program, Plan My Volunteering PVN Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal

 

Volunteering with Adventure program

 

2 weeks PVN-Nepal Adventure program

1st Day     –     Arrival – Welcome dinner.

2nd Day     –     Language Training + Sightseeing.

3rd Day     –     Language Training + Sightseeing + Family stay information.

4th Day     –     Staying with local family and volunteering.

5th to 10th Day –     Volunteering on the project, staying at a local host family.

11th Day     –     Go to Chitwan Jungle safari

12th Day     –     Chitwan National Park Activities.

13th Day     –     Traveling back Kathmandu and report writing.

Final Day     –     Feedback and good bye dinner.

 

 

4 weeks PVN- Nepal Volunteer program

1st Day     –     Arrival – Welcome dinner.

2nd to 4th Day     –     Language training, Staying at hotel and family.

5th to 20th Day     –     Volunteering on the project, Staying at a local host family.

21st to 24th Day     –     go to Chitwan Jungle safari Activities.

25th to 26th Day     –     Rafting, Camping at the Beach.

27th to 28th Day     –     Reternback to kathmandu.

Final Day     –             Feedback and good bye Dinner.

 

 

6 weeks  PVN-Nepal Volunteer program

1st Day     –     Arrival – Welcome dinner.

2nd to 6th Day     –     Language training, Staying at hotel and family.

7th to 28th Day     –     Volunteering on the project, Staying at a local host Family.

29th to 32nd Day     –     Chitwan National Park Activities.

33rd to 38th Day     –     Trekking – Staying at Tea house.

39th to 40th Day     –     Rafting – Camping at the Beach.

41st to 43rd Day     –     Traveling Back to kathmandu.

Final Day     –     Feedback and good bye dinner.

 

 

8 weeks PVN- Nepal Volunteer program

1st Day     –     Arrival – Welcome dinner.

2nd to 7th Day     –     Language training, Staying at Hotel and Family.

8th to 35th Day     –     Volunteering on the project, Staying at a local host Family.

36th to 40th Day     –     Chitwan National Park Activities.

41st to 48th Day     –     Trekking, Staying at Tea house.

50th to 52nd Day     –     Rafting, Camping at the beach.

53rd to 56th Day     –     Traveling up and down.

57th to 58th Day     –     Free day….

Final Day     –     Feedback and good bye party.

 

To know more about the Program please contact us info@pvnnepal.org

 

http://www.pvnnepal.org/page.php?id=87&page=Adventure Program

 

3.)  Excavating Another Dinosaur, Williams Spring Archeological Dig,  Passport in Time Program, Medicine Bow-Routt NF, near Newcastle, SD

 

Volunteer with archeological digs or historic restoration projects!

 

Medicine Bow-Routt NF

 

New! Excavating Another Dinosaur!

 

WY-4162

July 15-20, 2013 (including weekend)

 

Must commit to entire session

 

Another dinosaur, you say?! Well, same dinosaur we found in 2009, but join us this summer as we give the fossil a new home! Our project will entail removal of the second Triceratops we located during the 2009 survey in the Alkali Creek Paleontological Special Interest Area. We will exhume the dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation, using proven paleontological excavation techniques. Volunteers will remove matrix with shovels, pick axes, rock hammers, tooth brushes, and so on, and will then document and collect loose skeletal pieces. We’ll then apply plaster and burlap to remove the fossil for transport to and long-term curation at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology (SDSM&T) Museum of Geology in Rapid City. We may also have time to collect micro-vertebrate sites while we work on the dino fossil. This project should be another fun and interesting one, so we hope you’ll join us in July!

 

Number of openings: 15

 

Special skills: Must be physically capable of bending, sitting, standing, and/or kneeling for long periods each day, and in a variety of weather conditions (mostly hot!); previous excavation, pedestrian survey, fossil identification, and/or paleontological experience helpful, but not required

 

Minimum age: 15 years old, under 18 with a responsible adult

 

Facilities: Dispersed tent or RV camping in remote area of Thunder Basin NG; base camp tent with cook stoves, pots/pans, utensils; chemical toilets, hot water showers, water for drinking and cooking; optional caterer ($25/day for participants interested); volunteers responsible for personal camping equipment, food (if not opting for catering), and transportation

 

Nearest towns: Newcastle, 38 miles

 

Applications due: May 20, 2013

http://www.passportintime.com/

 

4.)  Wilderness Ranger (BWCAW),  Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, Ely, MN

 

Volunteers will be working with our Wilderness Rangers within the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW). Four duty stations are availabe: Cook, Ely, Grand Marias, and Tofte and each of these offices are taking applications.

 

The BWCAW is approximately 1 million acres that borders Canada. Travel within this wilderness is done mainly by canoe and portages (trails) are utilized to go from one lake to the next. This particular program begins in the first part of June and ends usually in mid to late August. The ending date is flexible, but we do prefer a commitment of 2-3 months. Free lodging is available in our newly constructed dorm style housing units and has most of your basic amenities. A subsistence reimbursement is also given to those that are accepted.

 

The first week in June is dedicated to training. Some of this training includes: crosscut saw use, basic trail and backcountry campsite maintenance, First Aid/CPR, canoe and watercraft operation, and proper use and care of hand tools. The main tools that we use are: crosscut saws, pulaskis, shovels, nippers, axes, etc. Another useful tool in the evening is a fishing pole.

 

A typical two week schedule consists of 7-8 days and nights camping, canoeing, and working hard within the BWCAW followed by six days off and then back in the woods for another 7-8 days. Our experienced Wilderness Rangers typically work from 7am to 5:30pm while in the BWCAW. Expect to paddle about 8-15 miles a day and portage (carry) your share of camping gear, tools, and canoes across those trails that connects our many lakes. During the work day Wilderness Rangers will be maintaining those backcountry primitive campsites and logging/brushing out those portages as they travel. Sometimes you might stay at the same campsite within the BWCAW and other times you may be camping at different sites on different lakes throughout your 7-8 days. Most of the basic camping gear is supplied by the US Forest Service. This gear includes: tent, sleeping bag, thermarest, stove, pots/pans, fuel, water filter, life jacket, and paddle. This will all be supplied in one Duluth Pack and is yours to utilize for the summer.

 

When the work day is done and you are free to do whatever you like whether it’s fishing for trophy size walleyes and bass, swimming in our pristine lakes, or reading a book as the sun sets. Our volunteers in the past have said this was one of the greatest experiences that they have had. The only regret that you may have is not applying.

 

There are also numerous other volunteer opportunities that is available on the Superior National Forest. Some of the possibilities include but are not limited to: wildlife surveys, GPS/GIS, Adopt a Canoe Route, trail clearing, etc. Contact Steve Cochran for further details.

Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Address:  1393 Hwy 169 Ely, MN 55731

Contact:  Steven Cochran 218-365-7610

Availability:  11/1/2012–10/1/2013

Created:  5/3/2013

Suitability:  Adults

Difficulty:  Strenuous

http://www.volunteer.gov/results.cfm?states=MN

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Sonoma Youth Ecology Corps Crew Leader, Conservation Corps North Bay, Cotati, California

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=421500017

 

***  From Bill Seiberlich:

 

2.)  Outreach & Public Relations Coordinator, Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation, Camp Hill, PA

OVERALL SUMMARY: This position utilizes appropriate tools and strategies to advance our mission, build public awareness, attract project sponsors and partners, and to create an environment of support for our programs.

POSITION ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS
– Strategy Development: Develop and implement media and marketing campaigns and activities to promote awareness, involvement, and loyalty towards PPFF and our programs.
– Coordinate direct mail and communication pieces including-could include design, editing, printing, processing, and mailing.
– Prepare/Write content for and proofread newsletters, brochures, letters and other materials for grammar, style and content.
– Assist with special event planning, sponsor solicitation, organization, and marketing. Serve as primary liaison and coordinator for annual awards banquet.
– Offer presentations to corporate lunch and learns as well as to tourism, civic and business clubs for promoting PPFF and building of partnerships.
– Work to promote PPFF and our mission through social media and our website.
– Work with the Board of Directors to assist in their outreach and fundraising endeavors
– Assist in implementing the overall PPFF development and strategic plan.
– Develop and maintain wide list of media contacts and respond to media calls in timely manner.
– Perform grant research.

Financial: Rate of $16.50-$17.00/hr; 28-30 hours per week. Benefits:
Flex time, Simple IRA after one year employment, vacation after one year employment.

POSITION ESSENTIAL REQUIREMENTS
– Ability to think creatively, generate new ideas, develop strategies and follow through.
– Ability to meet deadlines and balance multiple projects; ability to work within budget.
– Superb written & verbal skills; able to work successfully in team environment and in small office setting. Strong organizational, administrative, time management and interpersonal skills.
– Commitment to the mission of the Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation
– Publisher, PowerPoint, Excel, social media required; web design experience preferred.
– Ability to work Saturdays and evenings as necessary; travel required.
– Ability to withstand long periods of sitting, extensive computer work; lifting up to 25 lbs.
– BA or BS in public relations, communications, marketing, or equivalent experience.

Contact: Send resume and writing sample by May 17th, to Marci Mowery,
Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation (www.PaParksAndForests.org), 1845 Market Street, Suite 202, Camp Hill, PA 17011 or ppffnewsletter@pa.net.

 

***  From mark Sofman

 

3.)  Kayaking & Snorkeling Guide, La Jolla Sea Cave Kayaks, La Jolla, CA

http://bit.ly/ZPSdSV

 

4.)  Event Intern- US Open of Surfing (Summer 2013), IMG, Los Angeles, CA

http://bit.ly/ZPTaKY

 

5.)  Paddleboard Instructor, SUP Iowa, Inc, Okoboji, IA

http://bit.ly/ZPSK7l

 

6.)  Alligator/Zebra Handler and Photographer, Wild Florida, Saint Cloud, FL

http://bit.ly/ZPTtFt

 

7.)  Boat Washer/Dock Master, Freedom Boat Club, Palmetto, FL

http://cb.com/ZPUttf

 

8.)  Director of Education, Audubon Canyon Ranch, Glen Ellen, California

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=25917

 

***  Also from Bill Seiberlich:

 

9.)  Administrative Assistant, Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation, Philadelphia, PA

Organization: The Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation
(GPTMC) is a private, non-profit organization that promotes leisure
travel to Philadelphia and The Countryside®. GPTMC builds the regions
economy and image through destination marketing that increases the
number of visitors, the number of nights they stay and the number of
things they do. These efforts enhance the quality of life and sense of
pride for residents. For more information regarding GPTMC, please go to
http://www.visitphilly.com/about/.

Position: A pivotal, primarily administrative position in GPTMCs
Communications Department, the Administrative Assistant keeps the
department running smoothly, working directly with the VP of
Communications on the VPs scheduling and department meeting scheduling;
meeting, event and media distribution support and accounting.
The primary areas of responsibility for this position are as follows:

Communications Assistance
– Manage calendar for VP of Communications, as well as all departmental
meetings and internal events
– Track and keep up-to-date Communications Department calendar of
external meetings
– Process, file and save invoices, AMEX statements, cash
reimbursements
– Write up Payment Authorization Forms (PAFs) for all invoices
– Assist in organizing VPs work-related travel
– Take charge of coordinating logistics for all internal and external
departmental meetings
– Track and distribute all media subscriptions and team memberships
– Assist in supporting and, in some cases, working at events (e.g.,
GPTMC press conferences, July 4th and New Years Week press conferences
and events, Made in America media tie-in events, sports/playoffs media
opportunities, both GPTMC annual events, Philly 360 annual event, events
in key feeder markets, etc.)
– Create presentations for monthly all-staff meetings representing the
Communications Department output
– Set up monthly budget meetings
– Actively participate in all department and staff meetings
– Provide project assistance to directors in the Communications
Department: content development, material preparation, and
PowerPoint/video/collateral coordination, correspondence and
coordination for related conferences, meetings, and presentations.
– Manage any special projects assigned by the VP

Media Assistance
– Work with Media Analyst to learn and support our media monitoring,
distribution and reporting efforts, becoming proficient and able to
stand in when necessary for the MA to produce daily, monthly and special
media coverage reports
– Pull targeted media lists as needed, working with Media Analyst
– Distribute press releases to customized Cision database and special
email lists
– Gain/develop in-depth knowledge of the destination, particularly the
areas of emphasis for GPTMC, our media news room, and our content
assets, including photography and video
– Reply to media inquiries and redirect as appropriate
– Assist in execution of selected visiting journalist program (VJP)
trips as determined by director of media relations and director of
communications
– Be an active member our corporate communications team, providing
perspective and input on all aspects of the work we do to promote
Philadelphia as a destination.

Qualifications
– At least one year of administrative experience, preferably in a
communications department
– Experience multi-tasking, creating and managing Outlook calendars,
planning and arranging all aspects of meetings
– Strong computer experience/skill, including functional knowledge of
Word, databases such as Excel and PowerPoint for creating presentations
and reports
– Ability to organize and retrieve complex information, such as media
lists, that are tools for the department
– Good budgetary skills
– Strong organization skills and attention to detail
– Responsible, flexible, proactive and interested in learning
– Knowledge of and passion for the city and the five-county
Philadelphia region
– Strong communications skills
– Sensitive to confidential information; not willing to engage in rumor
or innuendo
– Ability to establish priorities and meet deadlines

Education Requirements: Bachelors degree

GPTMC is an Equal Opportunity Employer that encourages candidates of
all backgrounds to apply for this position.

Contact: Please send a cover letter, resume and salary requirements
to: jobs@gptmc.com. Thank you for your interest.

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

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Your Very Next Step newsletter for March 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for March 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Nature is trying very hard to make us succeed, but nature does not depend on us. We are not the only experiment.”

-R. Buckminster Fuller

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 591 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Heather Murphy:  Keep on Truckee’ing

***  Most U.S. Flights Are on Smaller Jets; Tight Squeezes and ‘the Right Amount of Misery’

***  Regulations and Permits on the AT

***  Uncomfortable seats, bag fees rank high among air travelers’ dislikes

***  How to Climb Katahdin

***  Does Southwest really save you money?

***  Hiking Food:

***  Ribbon of Blue – The Connecticut River then and now

***  America’s State Parks

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: February 2013
California’s Truckee River Bike Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Experienced sea kayakers, AMC Staff at Knubble Bay Camp, Georgetown Maine

2.)  Tour Guide Manager, Grand Circle Corporation, Boston, MA

3.)  Director of Development and Communications, National Ability Center, Park City, Utah

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Associate Director of Corporate Practices Communications, The Nature Conservancy, Washington, DC

2.)  Director of Marketing, International Expeditions, Birmingham, AL

3.)  Pass Programs Manager, Colorado Ski Country USA, Denver, CO

4.)  Guide, Raft Masters, Canon City, Colorado

5.)  EVENT STAFF, Glacier Park, Inc., Columbia Falls, MT 59912

6.)  Publisher, National Wildlife Federation, Reston, VA

7.)   Marketing Manager/ Writer, National Recreation and Park Association, Ashburn, VA

8.)  Communications and Media Coordinator, Management Assistance Team, National Conservation Leadership Institute, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, Shepherdstown, WV

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Heather Murphy:  Keep on Truckee’ing

 

Ned,

 

I enjoyed the latest Your Very Next Step, especially the segment on the National Rail-Trail of the month: California’s Truckee River Bike Trail by Laura Stark.  I was lucky enough to be on a trip to the greater Lake Tahoe area in fall 2010.  This was in the shoulder season — after peak summer and before the winter snows.  There were many trails to explore and the crowds were thin.

 

We made it up to Truckee and were lucky enough to have a fabulous breakfast at the Squeeze In.  It is a tiny place at 10060 Donner Pass Road in Truckee that purports to serve “The Best Omelettes on the Planet.”  That  assessment is entirely accurate with bonus points for excellence beyond any omelet I’ve eaten.  I should add that Squeeze In has been featured on a Bobby Flay Throwdown.  Every single thing about the restaurant was exceptional — from the collection of kitsch and stickers on the wall to the amazing food.  My squeeze ordered a side biscuit with sausage gravy — I took a sample.  I’m not really a biscuits and gravy person but the Squeeze In’s was nearly a religious experience…and who doesn’t need a little religion?  (http://www.squeezein.com)

 

Truckee also has a variety of quaint shops.  One of my favorites was Ambiance Home Comforts, owned by Bill & Mary Kay Benner (10156 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA  96161 — TOLL FREE (866)401-4440).  This shop stocked a variety of candles and Christmas ornaments and other gift items.  I happened to open the lid of a candle that smelled exactly like the name:  Balsam & Cedar.  Trying to travel light, I did not buy one.  Months later, I called the shop and Bill & Mary Kay knew exactly what I was talking about, shipped the candle and made it possible to enjoy an aromatic reminder of the stop in Truckee.

 

Cheers, Ned.  Thanks for an enjoyable trip down memory lane.

 

Heather Murphy

 

***  Most U.S. Flights Are on Smaller Jets; Tight Squeezes and ‘the Right Amount of Misery’

 

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323478304578330293636960034.html

 

***  Regulations and Permits on the AT

 

http://www.appalachiantrail.org/hiking/hiking-basics/regulations-permits

 

***  Uncomfortable seats, bag fees rank high among air travelers’ dislikes

 

http://www.usatoday.com/story/todayinthesky/2013/02/26/poll-fliers-most-annoyed-by-tight-seats-bag-fees/1948891/

 

***  How to Climb Katahdin

 

Planning a trip to Baxter State Park to hike the focal point of the destination, Katahdin, can be a task heavier than one’s backpack. Carey Kish, editor of the Maine Mountain Guide, explains ways to plan ahead and prepare—including camping, hiking trails, and safety—that will jump-start a successful trip to Maine’s highest summit.

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/web/how-to-climb-katahdin.cfm

 

***  Does Southwest really save you money?

 

Study Challenges Southwest’s Low-Fare Image

 

By Jay Boehmer

 

http://www.businesstravelnews.com/Business-Travel/Study-Challenges-Southwest-s-Low-Fare-Image/?ida=Airlines&a=proc&cid=eltrDaily

 

***  Hiking Food:

 

For short hikes, food is more of a nice to have rather than a necessity. But, on long hikes, an adequate food supply is critical to success and safety.

 

http://hikingdude.com/hiking-food.php

 

***  Ribbon of Blue

 

The Connecticut River then and now

 

By Michael Tougias

 

AMC Outdoors, March/April 2013

 

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/2013/features/paddling-the-connecticut-river.cfm

 

***  AMERICA’S FIRST BLUEWAY

 

Establishing the Connecticut River Watershed as a National Blueway will help promote access to the rivers and trails in the watershed for outdoor recreation, conservation of wildlife habitat and working lands, and support travel, tourism and outdoor recreation economies throughout the watershed.

 

http://www.outdoors.org/about/newsroom/press/2012/first-national-blueway.cfm

 

***  America’s State Parks

 

America’s State Parks helps capture the collective strength and importance of the great park systems developed in the 50 states. With over 7,000 units and more than 720 million visits, America’s State Parks works to enhance the American quality of life. NASPD board members representing each region of the country initially governed the America’s State Parks alliance.

 

http://www.americasstateparks.org/About

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: March 2013
New Hampshire’s Northern Rail Trail
By Laura Stark

Daniel Webster, the famed orator and New Hampshire native, was a featured speaker at the 1847 ribbon cutting for Boston and Maine Railroad’s Northern Line. At the ceremony in Lebanon, before a crowd of more than a thousand, he said of the railroad, “It is the spirit and influence of free labor, it is the indomitable industry of a free people, that has done all this.”

The same could be said of today’s Northern Rail Trail, which begins just steps away from where Webster gave that keynote address and follows the same path as the railway once did. It was built by the hard and loving labor of hundreds of volunteers and is now the longest rail-trail in the state, spanning 52 miles.

“This is one of the best examples in this region of a trail that’s being developed at the grassroots level,” says Carl Knoch, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy’s (RTC) manager of trail development in the Northeast.

Although the corridor was purchased by the state when the railroad abandoned the line in 1996, the trail’s development has been fervently pursued at the local level. “It probably has the greatest number of groups involved in trying to develop it as a trail,” says Chris Gamache, Chief Supervisor for the New Hampshire Bureau of Trails, which oversees the trail. “There are lots of groups working together to the same end goal.” It was for this reason that the Northern Rail Trail was featured in RTC’s 2012 Community Built report, highlighting exceptional local efforts across America of citizens and volunteers using community strength to build and maintain public pathways.

Shortly after the trail was turned over to the state, snowmobile groups saw the potential of the corridor for recreational use and began to work on it. “The snowmobile clubs were the original maintainers of the trail,” Gamache says. Volunteers from the Andover Snowmobile Club, Lakes Region Snowmobile Club, Town Line Trail Dusters and others removed railroad ties, redecked bridges (the trail has more than a dozen), trimmed trees and completed other tasks to make the trail safe and operational.

To address the needs of the trail during the warmer months, two nonprofit groups were formed, one in each of the two counties that the trail traversed.

“Our work was relatively low cost because much of the trail did not have heavy ballast on it,” says Dick Mackay, chair of the Friends of the Northern Rail Trail in Grafton County that manages the trail’s northern end. “We didn’t have all this broken stone. We had cinder, a black, grainy material that’s soft and resilient. It’s actually one of the best possible surfaces. When the ties were pulled out, we had a trail!”

Volunteers at the southern half of the trail did not have it so easy. “The railroad construction in the two counties was dramatically different,” says Alex Bernhard, vice president of Friends of the Northern Rail Trail in Merrimack County. “The railroad upgraded the southern half by laying heavy stone ballast. It has great drainage and is stable for the ties. But when you take up the ties it’s impossible to walk on or ride a bike on for any length of time and you can’t ride a horse on it either.”

The Merrimack County group has spent much of its budget (largely provided by Transportation Enhancements and Recreational Trails Program grants) purchasing, trucking and laying down a custom-designed stone dust over the rocky ballast. Without this special mixture, the trail would only be useable in the winter when heavy snowfalls cover the uneven surface. Another project has been the careful restoration of the granite mileposts lining this section of trail, lingering relics of the corridor’s past. Used by train engineers, the numbers on the posts indicate the distance from either B (Boston) or WRJ (White River Junction).

When track construction was attempted through Enfield, the railroad had an unexpected fight on its hands. Although the conservative Shaker community in town did not want the gleaming modern trains within sight of their quiet enclave (a place so beautiful they called it the “Chosen Vale”), they recognized the value of a readily accessible means of exporting their wares. So a deal was struck: in return for an investment in the railroad venture, the tracks were moved away from the Shaker village to the other side of Mascoma Lake. One of the railroad’s locomotives was even dubbed “The Shaker.” Less than a mile from the trail, the Enfield Shaker Museum offers an intriguing place to learn about the Shakers that settled here in 1793 and practiced equality, celibacy, pacifism and communal property ownership.

Further south, in Andover, history buffs will not want to miss a stop at Potter Place, a Victorian rail station maintained by the Andover Historical Society. Inside, the feeling of a busy train depot in the early to mid-1900s is carefully preserved. An adjacent caboose can be explored. Across from the station lies the homestead and gravesite of Richard Potter, a magician and ventriloquist who broke new ground as an African-American performer throughout the country in the early 19th century. Another notable stop is Franklin, where you can visit Daniel Webster’s birthplace, as well as nearby Webster Lake, where he spent many summers.

For those interested in nature, the trail does not disappoint. New Hampshire had been vying to be the most-forested state in the lower 48, and recently nabbed the title over Maine, its longtime rival. Nearly 89 percent of the Granite State is forested, including the area through which the trail runs. If you’re looking to see moose south of Alaska, Tewksbury Pond and the surrounding marshlands between Canaan and Grafton is a place they frequent. The occasional bear can be found here, too, as well as eagles, herons, and a flock of wild turkeys in Canaan.

With its increasing year-round popularity, there are movements afoot to expand the trail from both ends. In the north, fundraising is underway to begin construction on the Mascoma River Greenway that would seamlessly extend the Northern Rail Trail four miles closer to the Connecticut River along the state’s border with Vermont.

A hoped-for trail terminus is White River Junction, Vt., where the Northern Railroad originally ended. From the rail-trail’s southern end, plans are to extend the trail from Boscawen to Concord by summer 2015. This would provide easy access to and from the state capital and I-93, a major thoroughfare.

“The comment we always get about the trail is, ‘This was here and we didn’t even know it!” says Mackay. “They’re stunned that there could be such a wonderful place to walk or bike so close to home.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Experienced sea kayakers, AMC Staff at Knubble Bay Camp, Georgetown Maine

 

Knubble Bay Camp in Georgetown Maine is looking for experienced sea kayakers to join their committee and help guide AMC members on excursions from the camp. The camp is run by a committee of volunteers since 1979 and regularly provides training to club members who want to learn how to sea kayak. Potential candidates should posses good communication skills, group leadership experience, and a willingness to support the mission.

http://activities.outdoors.org/search/index.cfm/action/details/id/23790

 

2.)  Tour Guide Manager, Grand Circle Corporation, Boston, MA

http://www.linkedin.com/jobs?viewJob=&jobId=4893884

 

3.)  Director of Development and Communications, National Ability Center, Park City, Utah

http://www.idealist.org/view/job/MT9htXKMn3H4/

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

1.)  Associate Director of Corporate Practices Communications, The Nature Conservancy, Washington, DC

http://bit.ly/12s3jys

 

2.)  Director of Marketing, International Expeditions, Birmingham, AL

http://www.linkedin.com/jobs?viewJob=&jobId=4895241

 

***  From Andrew Hudson’s Job List:

 

3.)  Pass Programs Manager, Colorado Ski Country USA, Denver, CO

http://andrewhudsonsjobslist.com/index.cfm?PID=805&ID=8788,30012,0&#j8

 

4.)  Guide, Raft Masters, Canon City, Colorado

http://raftmasters.com/guide-training.php

 

5.)  EVENT STAFF, Glacier Park, Inc., Columbia Falls, MT 59912

https://external-glacierpark-viad.icims.com/jobs/2446/job

 

6.)  Publisher, National Wildlife Federation, Reston, VA

http://jobview.monster.com/GetJob.aspx?JobID=120291232

 

7.)   Marketing Manager/ Writer, National Recreation and Park Association, Ashburn, VA

 

The National Recreation & Park Association is actively seeking a team player with strong writing skillsto join our team as a Marketing Manager. This role will be responsible to manage several marketing projects but will also serve as the point person to craft messages to our members that will motivate them to take action. This position will entail editing the content from other departments as well as developing new content for a wide range of multimedia channels (web, email, social, mobile, video, etc.) copy for emails, publications and the web. Specific experience in an individual membership organization, marketing products and services to members is highly desirable.

 

Summary:

•Create innovative and effective messages that compel members to engage, renew, donate, volunteer or take another actionfor a variety of media platforms including email campaigns, online and mobile experiences, and social applications.

•Manage the process and deliverable for several short term and long term marketing projects.

•Display agility in balancing short-notice requests with longer-term projects.

•Ensure that projects are delivered in keeping with established campaign schedules.

•Proactively gather resource material and conduct cursory research for campaign development and strategy.

•Consult and partner with staff, clients and members in a collaborative effort to ensure the highest quality of the associations creative work.

•Stay current with advances in consumer media consumption habits, techniques, emerging technologies and tactics.

 

DISCOVER the BENEFITS at NRPA!

 

Conveniently located off the Dulles Greenway, in Brambleton Regional Park in Ashburn, NRPA boasts a warm professional environment, with a relaxing and peaceful view of nature at its finest! All staff have access to indoor & outdoor eating areas, as well as indoor & outdoor fitness opportunities. Our facility has a brand new air-conditioned fitness room with access to showers, as well as foot trails for the outdoor enthusiast. Full time staff enjoy a very rich benefit package that includes group Health, Dental, and Vision for employee and family, paid 80% by the employer;403(b) fully vested upon hire; Life insurance, Short Term Disability and Long Term Disability paid 100% by the employer; accrue 26 Paid days off per year plus 13 paid holidays, eligibility in the first month of employment, Length of Service Awards and much, much more! NRPA is committed to promoting an environment of work-life balance. To promote healthy lifestyles, at work and away, we have established programs like Teleworking, FlexTime Schedules, 37.5 hour work-week, Employee Assistance Programs, Educational Assistance Programs, Lunch-and-Learn sessions and more. Discover what we already know about NRPA … it’s a great place to work!

 

APPLICATION PROCESS

 

Position will remain open until filled. Applicants must apply through NRPA’s Recruitment system to be considered. Also submit resume, salary requirements and salary history. Enter information in the “Notes” section to include a cover letter or list employee referrals.

 

NRPA is an EQUAL OPPORTUNITY employer with a COMMITMENT to DIVERSITY. Women and ethnic minorities ENCOURAGED to apply.

 

Salary Range: $50,000 – $55,000

 

NOTES: Local Residents Preferred (No Relo)

 

Requirements

 

•Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism, English, Marketing Communications, or related discipline preferred

•3-5 years’ experience in conception and execution of email, copywriting, communications field, association experience a plus

•Knowledge of Microsoft Office (Outlook, Excel, Word)

•Experience in creating compelling copy for: email promotions, e-newsletters, online display media, campaign web copy, storyboards and scripts for interactive and viral marketing pieces.

•Knowledge of online and mobile experiences, email campaigns, and social applications, as demonstrated through a robust portfolio.

 

http://asi.careerhq.org/jobs#/detail/5252621

***  From Amanda Myers:

 

Please post the following job in your newsletter. Thank you!

Amanda Myers

Training and Information Services Administrator

Management Assistance Team

National Conservation Leadership Institute

Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

Shepherdstown, WV

amandam@matteam.org

www.matteam.org

www.conservationleadership.org

 

8.)  Communications and Media Coordinator, Management Assistance Team, National Conservation Leadership Institute, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, Shepherdstown, WV

 

The Management Assistance Team located in Shepherdstown, WV, seeks an individual with strong communication and media skills to join the team of five other high performing professionals. Duties include a broad spectrum of communication and multimedia production responsibilities. Excellent written and verbal communication skills as well as working knowledge of MS Office required. Skills in desktop publishing and digital video editing software strongly preferred. Competitive salary based on experience plus benefits. Go to www.matteam.org for a full position description and instructions on how to apply.

 

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

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Your Very Next Step newsletter for February 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for February 2013

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Energy and persistence conquer all things.”

– Benjamin Franklin

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 611 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Niagra Falls

***  The Airfarewatchblog Airline Fees Guide

***  Navigating the land

***  Wandering through the medinas of Morocco

***  What is the GBBC?

***  Minnesota’s Breeding Bird Atlas: Help Write the Book on Minnesota’s Breeding Birds!

***  Albatross named Wisdom astounds scientists by producing chick at age 62

***   Welcome to Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: February 2013
California’s Truckee River Bike Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  SoMo Pima Canyon Trail & Land Rehab, VOAZ, Pima Canyon, AZ

2.)  Volunteer Naturalist, Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy,  Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority, Los Angeles, CA

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Public Affairs Specialist, Campbell Creek Science Center (CCSC), Anchorage District Office (ADO), Bureau of Land Management, Department Of The Interior, Anchorage, Alaska

2.)  Executive Director, Point Reyes National Seashore Association, Point Reyes Station, California

3.)  Vice President/Executive Director, Audubon Connecticut, Greenwich, Connecticut

4.)  Director Integrated Marketing (Digital and Advertising) (HQ6461), REI, Kent, Washington

5.)  Marketing and Communications Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., Audubon, PA

6.)  Lead Teacher Naturalist (Summer), Richardson Bay Audubon Center & Sanctuary, Tiburon, CA

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  From Mat Matta:

 

Niagra Falls

 

Hi Ned,

 

Just dropping you a note on my recent trip to Buffalo, Niagara and Toronto.   Did all three cities over the course of weekend hockey tournament.

 

My son’s hockey team played in a PeeWee hockey tournament in Niagara Falls  so we took the opportunity to experience as much as we could.

 

We flew into Buffalo one day early so we could head straight to the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto.    I hadn’t been to the Hall in 20 years and my son had never been so it was fun to see him see all the great exhibits.  We took pics with the Stanley Cup and played the interactive games and watched some very good videos and movies.   You need to devote at least three hours to fully enjoy all the exhibits.

 

Following the Hall of Fame, we dined at Wayne Gretzky’s restaurant in Toronto and were greeted by his father, Walter, who was very gregarious and posed for picture and proffered autographs to all comers.     The food was surprisingly good for a sports bar.  There is a small Gretzky museum  in the restaurant.   Walter said he influenced Wayne in his career by preaching that from early on you must be prepared to play  meaning he ate right and got plenty of sleep.

 

We also went as a team to the Anchor Bar in downtown Buffalo.    Buffalo wings were supposedly invented there by Teressa Bellissimo  in 1964.  The wings were spicy and the beer was cold.  The Anchor bar didn’t disappoint.  Buffalo also has a small military waterfront park which includes 2 ships and a submarine along with a few planes, tanks and other vehicles.   It’s small but perfect for kids to blow off some energy .

 

Niagara Falls in the winter is quite a sight.   The mist settles on everything creating a thick coating of ice.  The area surrounding the falls is filled with plenty of souvenir shops, restaurants and casinos.  We ate lunch just a few feet from the Horseshoe Falls on the Canadian side.   Unfortunately much of the Falls  attractions close in October so we couldn’t  ride the Maid of the Mist or explore the caves.   I do recommend viewing from both sides of the border.  On the American side I recommend driving on to  Goat Island  which is a State Park to view the Falls in a  sylvan setting.

 

And in the tournament, my son’s team made it to the semi-finals before falling to a team from Mississauga, Ontario.

 

***  The Airfarewatchblog Airline Fees Guide

http://www.airfarewatchdog.com/blog/13842767/introducing-our-brand-new-airline-fees-guide/

 

***  Navigating the land:

 

The idea of hunting the backcountry is increasingly appealing to many folks. Today, it seems everyone has a GPS unit and can travel for days over diverse country. But, what occurs when the GPS is inoperable or the batteries die? Do you know how to navigate without your GPS in country you’ve never been in or seen in daylight? How about when fog or snow sets in? How competent are you with a map and compass?

If we are going to travel in the backcountry away from modern conveniences then we need to know how to return to the trailhead. It means personal responsibility beyond the green gate. Make the effort to learn basic navigation skills, determining declination, finding north on a compass and returning to your vehicle. Learn these skills and the backcountry becomes an endless wilderness that has no boundaries.

As a former search and rescue volunteer, I remember a group that was lost in the Cascade Range of Oregon. They called 911 to report they were lost, and when an intervening Sheriff’s deputy asked if they had a GPS, the answer was, “Yes, but we don’t know how to use it!”

A year later a similar call to 911 revealed that this family still had not learned the basics of GPS operation, as they requested “rescue” again from nearly the same location. The point being: know your equipment and how to use it.

If you don’t have navigation skills, even staying on roads and trails can lead to an unplanned overnight in the backcountry. One October an Oregon hunter on an ATV drove on a road away from camp to dispose of a deer carcass. Once he left the carcass, the return to camp seemed simple enough, but somehow he couldn’t follow his ATV tracks back to camp. He spent the night out without essentials. The next day he was found very cold and lucky to be alive. One of the lessons learned: always have the 12 essentials (see side bar). Staying hydrated and warm are two of the fundamentals of survival – add a head lamp to assist in gathering wood, and the fear factor is halved! Carry fresh spare batteries for all electronic devices.

At one time or another, many of us have become disoriented in patches of blow-down or stands of second-growth or dense young trees. Or when we’ve lost a trail due to snow-drifts or while navigating in the dark, but we’re not lost. The difference between disorientation and being lost can be subtle, but the decision between self-help and calling for rescue becomes critical.

The “disoriented” hiker may still have landmarks at his/her disposal, where the “lost” hiker may have none. When truly lost, the hiker typically wanders for hours or days in circles so random that search-and-rescue personnel experience difficulty making sense of the route. There is a common belief to always go downhill, or drop in elevation if disoriented. The reasoning is, “You’ll eventually hit a road.” Not true. That strategy can be very dangerous in many locales. So, how do you stay found?

  1. Know how to navigate using a map and compass.
  2. At a minimum, always carry a map, compass, headlamp and fire-starting equipment – and know how to start a fire in any conditions.
  3. Never go anywhere without the 12 Essentials.*
  4. Have a communication plan. If hunting with partners, test frequencies. Sample language: “I have a Fox 40 whistle. I’ll turn on my FRS/GMRS radio on-the-hour, starting at 0900. Then, every-hour, if we miss communicating, check back every half-hour.”
  5. Sit-down once disoriented. Don’t wait until you’re lost. This can be the most difficult survival decision a disoriented person may make. Get your bearings before moving.
  6. Always tell a reliable friend your itinerary. Leave a hide-a-key and notes with a map of your planned routing at home and in your vehicle, and give contingencies as best you can. If you are diverted from the original plan, decide whether sitting and waiting for rescue is the prudent thing.

Karl Findling, is the Oregon BHA representative-at-large and owner of Oregon Pack Works, LLC. He makes no claims to be an expert in backcountry navigation. The above stories and tips are merely stories and tips. Actual experiences may vary.

Note: The original Ten Essentials list was assembled in the 1930s by The Mountaineers, a Seattle-based organization for climbers and outdoor adventurers. In 2003, the group’s updated “systems” approach made its debut in its seminal text on climbing and outdoor exploration, Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills (The Mountaineers Books, 2010), now in its eighth edition.

 

* The 12 Essentials

 

Navigation (map and compass)

Sun protection (sunglasses and sunscreen)

Insulation (extra clothing)

Illumination (headlamp/flashlight)

First-aid supplies

Fire (waterproof matches/lighter/candles)

Repair kit and tools

Nutrition (extra food)

Hydration (extra water)

Emergency shelter

Communication (whistle/cell or satellite phone and/or, GMRS/FRS radio/ELB or SPOT®)

GPS (Global Positioning System)

 

Classic Ten Essentials:

Map

Compass

Sunglasses and sunscreen

Extra clothing

Headlamp/flashlight

First-aid supplies

Fire starter

Matches

Knife

Extra food

The idea of hunting the backcountry is increasingly appealing to many folks. Today, it seems everyone has a GPS unit and can travel for days over diverse country. But, what occurs when the GPS is inoperable or the batteries die? Do you know how to navigate without your GPS in country you’ve never been in or seen in daylight? How about when fog or snow sets in? How competent are you with a map and compass?

If we are going to travel in the backcountry away from modern conveniences then we need to know how to return to the trailhead. It means personal responsibility beyond the green gate. Make the effort to learn basic navigation skills, determining declination, finding north on a compass and returning to your vehicle. Learn these skills and the backcountry becomes an endless wilderness that has no boundaries.

As a former search and rescue volunteer, I remember a group that was lost in the Cascade Range of Oregon. They called 911 to report they were lost, and when an intervening Sheriff’s deputy asked if they had a GPS, the answer was, “Yes, but we don’t know how to use it!”

A year later a similar call to 911 revealed that this family still had not learned the basics of GPS operation, as they requested “rescue” again from nearly the same location. The point being: know your equipment and how to use it.

http://www.backcountryhunters.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=299&Itemid=123

 

***  Wandering through the medinas of Morocco

 

This Washington Post story brought back memories of our adventure in Morocco back when we were living overseas, especially the time spent inside the medina at Fes.

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/travel/wandering-through-the-medinas-of-morocco/2013/02/07/80bfcc36-6a5f-11e2-95b3-272d604a10a3_story.html

 

***  What is the GBBC?

 

The 2013 GBBC will take place Friday, February 15, through Monday, February 18. Please join us for the 16th annual count!

 

The Great Backyard Bird Count is an annual 4-day event that engages bird watchers of all ages in counting birds to create a real-time snapshot of where the birds are.

 

http://www.birdsource.org/gbbc

 

***  Minnesota’s Breeding Bird Atlas: Help Write the Book on Minnesota’s Breeding Birds!

 

(Metro and Central MN, NW, NE, and Southern MN)

 

This is a great opportunity to ‘bird with a purpose’ by participating in the Minnesota Breeding Bird Atlas, the largest, most comprehensive bird conservation project ever conducted in Minnesota. In 2009, Minnesota began this 5-year project to document every breeding species in the state and where they nest. If you ever needed a reason to get outside and go birding, this is it.

 

Now, after four successful seasons, there is only one more year to contribute breeding bird information and make a lasting contribution to Minnesota bird conservation.  In 2013, volunteers and partners will submit their sightings before September 1 which will wrap-up this historic project.  We are expecting the final season to our best ever!

 

There are Two Ways to Help

1.Surveyors select and sign-up for a critical (priority) block. Blocks are available throughout the state. Surveyors spend about 20 hours between March and August driving, walking, paddling, or biking through different habitats within their survey block to record what they see. The goal for every block survey is to record as many species as you can find with the strongest evidence of breeding observed for each species.  Evidence includes: seeing a pair in suitable habitat, an adult carrying nesting material or food, or seeing fledglings.

 

2. Field Observers document evidence of breeding species the same as surveyors, however, they are can submit observations from anywhere throughout the state or from your backyard or favorite birding site.

 

Participants do not need to be experts but need to be sure the species they report is correct.  We do not count birds and you don’t have to find nests, although by watching bird behavior you will definitely find them.

 

Please join us!

Your observations will help us learn more about our breeding birds and you will improve your bird identification and observational skills. Results from the Atlas will map the distribution of every breeding species we find and support local, county, state, and regional conservation planning.

 

To learn more about this project, how to participate, or see Atlas results to date, check out our project website, www.mnbba.org. Review the Handbook under the Materials tab and then use the Easy Guide to get started.

 

Still have questions? Contact the Project Coordinator, Bonnie Sample at bsample@audubon.org, or 651-739-9332, ext 20.

 

The Minnesota Breeding Bird Atlas is funded by the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund and the MN DNR, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Audubon Minnesota, the Minnesota Ornithologists’ Union, and the Natural Resources Research Institute at UMD.

 

http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/volunteering/opps/index.html#atlas

 

***  Albatross named Wisdom astounds scientists by producing chick at age 62

 

By Darryl Fears

The Washington Post

She is described as awesome. And wonderful. And maybe a little weird. She is the world’s oldest known living wild bird at age 62, and she produced a healthy chick that hatched Sunday.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/albatross-named-wisdom-astounds-scientists-by-giving-birth-at-age-62/2013/02/05/f46a68a6-6fc5-11e2-8b8d-e0b59a1b8e2a_story.html?wpisrc=emailtoafriend

 

***  Welcome to Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge

 

Midway, part of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, is one of the world’s most spectacular wildlife experiences. Nearly three million birds call it home for much of each year, including the world’s largest population of Laysan Albatrosses, or “gooney birds”. Hawaiian monk seals, green sea turtles and spinner dolphins frequent Midway’s crystal blue lagoon.

 

Midway became an “overlay” refuge in 1988, while still under the primary jurisdiction of the Navy. With the closure of Naval Air Facility Midway Island in 1993, there began a transition from bullets to birds, a change in mission from national defense to wildlife conservation.

 

Midway is one of the most remote coral atolls on earth. Yet, it is much, much more!

 

•the last link in a global telegraph system, inaugurated by a message from President Teddy Roosevelt on the Fourth of July, 1903

 

•a landing site for Pan Am Clippers enroute across the Pacific Ocean in the late 1930s

 

•the focus of a 1942 battle that changed the tide of war in the Pacific

 

•from July 1942 to the end of hostilities, Midway served as a submarine base that aided in bringing the war to a close

 

•naval air facility that played a pivotal role in support of the Korean War, the Cold War and the Vietnam War

http://www.fws.gov/midway/

 

Wisdom Hatches Another Chick! (February 5, 2012)

 

The world’s oldest living Laysan albatross, Wisdom, and her mate successfully hatched their chick on Sunday morning, February 3. Wisdom’s mate tends to his newly hatched chick just hours after it hatched. While this photo was taken, Wisdom was currently at sea feeding and will return when it is time for her shift to keep her youngest safe and warm

 

http://www.fws.gov/midway/whatsnew.html

 

Midway Atoll

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midway_Atoll

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: February 2013
California’s Truckee River Bike Trail
By Laura Stark

“As it lay there with the shadows of the mountains brilliantly photographed upon its still surface, I thought it must surely be the fairest picture the whole earth affords.”
—Mark Twain, American writer and humorist, on Lake Tahoe in Roughing It, published 1872

Surrounded by the majestic, snowcapped mountains of the Sierra Nevada and renowned for its clear blue water, the country’s second deepest lake is surely as stunning today as when Mark Twain saw it more than a century ago. In fact, Lake Tahoe was recently deemed America’s best lake by popular vote in a USA Today survey. Although dozens of tributaries flow into the lake, only one flows out, and it is along this waterway that the Truckee River Bike Trail is aligned.

“It’s a pretty spectacular setting,” says Barry Bergman, manager of trail development at Rails-to-Trails Conservancy’s Western office. “And it’s a year-round destination. The biggest crowds are in the winter, but it’s also busy in the summer because of the lake.”

The trail follows the former route of a tourist train that operated in the early 1900s. The Lake Tahoe Railway and Transportation Company took passengers from the bustling railroad town of Truckee (a stop along the First Intercontinental Railroad) to Tahoe City on the lake’s shore. From there, travelers could take steamships to other destinations on the lake. The railroad was leased to Southern Pacific Company in 1925, but by 1943 it had ceased operation, no match for the burgeoning car industry.

The critical role of railroads in the shaping of Truckee is fully explored in the Truckee Railroad Museum, which opened in 2010. Although the rail-trail stops about nine miles short of Truckee, you can continue heading north from its endpoint in Olympic Valley along the wide shoulder of Highway 89 to the downtown area where the museum is housed next to a historical, and still-functioning, train station. Before the railroad, the town was an important stagecoach and wagon stop called Coburn Station (after a saloon keeper) and retains its Wild West character in its rugged small-town feel and 19th century buildings.

The name Truckee that now graces the town, river and rail-trail, predates the coming of the railroad. Once known as the Salmon Trout River, the waterway was renamed for a leader of the Paiute tribe, known as Chief Truckee, in gratitude for guiding westward settlers through the area in the mid-1800s.

One notorious California-bound group, the Donner party, did not fair well. In late October 1846, the travel-weary group of more than 80 emigrants, many of whom were children, became stranded on the shores of Lake Truckee for several weeks in heavy snow, unable to complete their journey across the mountains. When they were finally rescued the following February, nearly half the group had perished, many from starvation. In a desperate attempt to survive, some had resorted to cannibalism. The Donner Memorial State Park in western Truckee stands as a testament to their tragic struggle.

South of Truckee the trail picks up in Olympic Valley, which was known as Squaw Valley when it was chosen to host the 1960 winter Olympic Games. In true American style, it was the first Olympic Games to tabulate scores by computer (IBM) and the opening and closing ceremonies were produced by famed animator Walt Disney. The elaborate entertainment involved 5,000 performers and set the standard for future Olympic Games.

Continuing south, through an evergreen forest, the asphalt trail closely follows the Truckee River, a pleasant place to cool off during a summer ride and an incredibly popular outlet for fishing, white water rafting, kayaking and paddle boarding. The area’s popularity is, however, a double-edged sword.

“The river is heavily impacted by recreational use and its banks are becoming very degraded,” says Lisa Wallace, executive director of the Truckee River Watershed Council. “We’re losing vegetation and overhanging banks for fish.”

To remedy the situation, the organization is partnering with the Tahoe City Public Utility District (TCPUD) and others to add more environmentally friendly river access points and directional signage in the hopes of improving the waterway so that it can continue to be enjoyed responsibly.

With this strong community support and its abundant beauty, the watershed became part of the National Forest Foundation’s “Treasured Landscapes, Unforgettable Experiences” program this past fall, one of only 14 sites chosen nationwide. The program will support additional efforts to restore and protect the much-loved and much-used resource.

The trail’s nearly seven-mile journey ends in Tahoe City, the gateway to the lake, just as the trains did decades ago. Interestingly, the unincorporated community is a city in name only. One of the responsibilities of its governing body, the TCPUD, is the development and management of the rail-trail.

“In the 1970s, TCPUD started a bicycle trail network in our district,” says Cindy Gustafson, the organization’s general manager. “Ever since that time, we’ve been working to complete a unified trail.”

Just this summer, a critical piece of the network fell into place when the Lakeside Trail, which directly connects to the Truckee River Bike Trail, opened in downtown Tahoe City. Nineteen miles of paved off-road trail are now accessible along the western and northern shores of the lake. In an area known for its extreme sports, the level, smooth pathways are a welcome addition for walkers, casual cyclists, inline skaters and families.

“We had all these segments of trail, but the biggest gap has been right through the heart of Tahoe City,” says Gustafson. “It forced bicyclists to share the road on a narrow two-lane roadway. The Lakeside Trail has connected everything together.”

With 300,000 to 400,000 annual visitors on the Truckee River Bike Trail alone, Gustafson says the community has been “hugely supportive” of these efforts. “It’s the most highly rated recreational facility that we operate,” she says. “Visitors and residents want to get outdoors and not be trapped in their cars.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  SoMo Pima Canyon Trail & Land Rehab, VOAZ, Pima Canyon, AZ

http://www.outdoorvolunteer.org/viewevent.aspx?eventid=798

 

2.)  Volunteer Naturalist, Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy,  Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority, Los Angeles, CA

 

Volunteer naturalists provide guided interptetive nature programs, host our nature center, or help patrol trails at many of our park locations. Thes duties are critical to meeting the agency goal of providing visitor service and education programs to the public at our park locations. Volunteers take part in a nationally recognized training program before staffing facilities and helping with special events. Additional training is provided for volunteers leading educational and interpretive programs for both schools and the general public. Continuous training is offered throughout the year in other specialty areas. Parks featuring volunteer led programs include Santa Clarita Woodlands, Franklin Canyon Park, King Gillete Ranch, Temescal Gateway Park, Upper Las Virgenes Open Space Preserve, Vista Hermosa Natural Park, and the Puente/Chino Hills in Whittier.

 

http://www.lamountains.com/involved.asp#volunteer naturalist

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Public Affairs Specialist, Campbell Creek Science Center (CCSC), Anchorage District Office (ADO), Bureau of Land Management, Department Of The Interior, Anchorage, Alaska

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/335933600

 

2.)  Executive Director, Point Reyes National Seashore Association, Point Reyes Station, California

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=327200017

 

3.)  Vice President/Executive Director, Audubon Connecticut, Greenwich, Connecticut

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=25501

 

4.)  Director Integrated Marketing (Digital and Advertising) (HQ6461), REI, Kent, Washington

https://www.rei.apply2jobs.com/ProfExt/index.cfm?fuseaction=mExternal.showJob&RID=6461

 

5.)  Marketing and Communications Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., Audubon, PA

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1569/job

 

6.)  Lead Teacher Naturalist (Summer), Richardson Bay Audubon Center & Sanctuary, Tiburon, CA

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1616/job

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

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Your Very Next Step newsletter for January 2013

Your Very Next Step newsletter for January 2013
By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Home is where one starts from.”

– T. S. Eliot

 

“In solitude, where we are least alone.”

-Lord Byron

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

Subscribe for free. Send a blank email to:
yourverynextstep-subscribe@topica.com.

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 650 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our website (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:

***  New ChargePoint Mobile App Shows Every US Charging Station

***  Navigating the land

***  Snowy Steps, Frozen Water

***  108 species spotted in annual bird count, but where are the diving ducks?

***  5 Tips to Stay Warm Outside In Winter

***  The Eagle Lake & West Branch Railroad

***  Reptiles Alive!

***  Vibrating Belt Uses GPS to Guide Cyclists By Tickling Them

***  “Take it Outside!”

***  User Review: Eagles Nest Outfitters Twilight LED Lights

***  2013 Cocktail Trends

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Grassland Bird Technician, Nature Conservancy, Milnor, North Dakota

2.)  River Clean Ups & Trail Maintenance, Guadalupe River Park Conservancy, San Jose CA

3.)  Trail Maintenance Volunteers, East Bay Regional Park District, Oakland, CA

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Summer Program Instructor – Log Rolling, Office of Student Affairs, Twin Cities Campus, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN

2.)  Projects Coordinator, Nepal, Zoological Society of London, Kathmandu and project sites, Nepal

3.)  Development and Fundraising Volunteer Organization, Save The Bay, Oakland, California

4.)  Communications Assistant, Principles for Responsible Investment, London, England

5.)  Executive Director, Outdoor Writers Association of America

6.)  Executive Director, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers (BHA), Joseph, OR (position location is flexible)

7.)  Manager, Major Donor Communications, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York

8.)  Development Coordinator, Defenders of Wildlife, Washington, DC

9.)  Federal Lands Policy Analyst, Defenders of Wildlife, Washington, DC

10.)  Vice President and Executive Director, Audubon Vermont National Audubon Society Huntington, Vermont

11.)  Outdoors Show Internship (Non-Paid, for Academic Credit), KSL Television, Bonneville Communications, Salt Lake City, UT

12.)  Center Director, Richardson Bay Audubon Center and Sanctuary, Audubon, Tiburon, California

13.)  Outreach Coordinator, National Audubon Society, Inc., Oyster Bay, NY

14.)  Half-Time Executive Director, Bike&Walk Montclair, Montclair, New Jersey

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  New ChargePoint Mobile App Shows Every US Charging Station

 

From Bernie Wagenblast’s Transportation Communications Newsletter, with a link to article on Green Car Reports:

http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1081356_new-chargepoint-mobile-app-shows-every-u-s-charging-station

 

***  Navigating the land:

 

The idea of hunting the backcountry is increasingly appealing to many folks. Today, it seems everyone has a GPS unit and can travel for days over diverse country. But, what occurs when the GPS is inoperable or the batteries die? Do you know how to navigate without your GPS in country you’ve never been in or seen in daylight? How about when fog or snow sets in? How competent are you with a map and compass?

If we are going to travel in the backcountry away from modern conveniences then we need to know how to return to the trailhead. It means personal responsibility beyond the green gate. Make the effort to learn basic navigation skills, determining declination, finding north on a compass and returning to your vehicle. Learn these skills and the backcountry becomes an endless wilderness that has no boundaries.

As a former search and rescue volunteer, I remember a group that was lost in the Cascade Range of Oregon. They called 911 to report they were lost, and when an intervening Sheriff’s deputy asked if they had a GPS, the answer was, “Yes, but we don’t know how to use it!”

A year later a similar call to 911 revealed that this family still had not learned the basics of GPS operation, as they requested “rescue” again from nearly the same location. The point being: know your equipment and how to use it.

If you don’t have navigation skills, even staying on roads and trails can lead to an unplanned overnight in the backcountry. One October an Oregon hunter on an ATV drove on a road away from camp to dispose of a deer carcass. Once he left the carcass, the return to camp seemed simple enough, but somehow he couldn’t follow his ATV tracks back to camp. He spent the night out without essentials. The next day he was found very cold and lucky to be alive. One of the lessons learned: always have the 12 essentials (see side bar). Staying hydrated and warm are two of the fundamentals of survival – add a head lamp to assist in gathering wood, and the fear factor is halved! Carry fresh spare batteries for all electronic devices.

At one time or another, many of us have become disoriented in patches of blow-down or stands of second-growth or dense young trees. Or when we’ve lost a trail due to snow-drifts or while navigating in the dark, but we’re not lost. The difference between disorientation and being lost can be subtle, but the decision between self-help and calling for rescue becomes critical.

The “disoriented” hiker may still have landmarks at his/her disposal, where the “lost” hiker may have none. When truly lost, the hiker typically wanders for hours or days in circles so random that search-and-rescue personnel experience difficulty making sense of the route. There is a common belief to always go downhill, or drop in elevation if disoriented. The reasoning is, “You’ll eventually hit a road.” Not true. That strategy can be very dangerous in many locales. So, how do you stay found?

  1. Know how to navigate using a map and compass.
  2. At a minimum, always carry a map, compass, headlamp and fire-starting equipment – and know how to start a fire in any conditions.
  3. Never go anywhere without the 12 Essentials.*
  4. Have a communication plan. If hunting with partners, test frequencies. Sample language: “I have a Fox 40 whistle. I’ll turn on my FRS/GMRS radio on-the-hour, starting at 0900. Then, every-hour, if we miss communicating, check back every half-hour.”
  5. Sit-down once disoriented. Don’t wait until you’re lost. This can be the most difficult survival decision a disoriented person may make. Get your bearings before moving.
  6. Always tell a reliable friend your itinerary. Leave a hide-a-key and notes with a map of your planned routing at home and in your vehicle, and give contingencies as best you can. If you are diverted from the original plan, decide whether sitting and waiting for rescue is the prudent thing.

Karl Findling, is the Oregon BHA representative-at-large and owner of Oregon Pack Works, LLC. He makes no claims to be an expert in backcountry navigation. The above stories and tips are merely stories and tips. Actual experiences may vary.

Note: The original Ten Essentials list was assembled in the 1930s by The Mountaineers, a Seattle-based organization for climbers and outdoor adventurers. In 2003, the group’s updated “systems” approach made its debut in its seminal text on climbing and outdoor exploration, Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills (The Mountaineers Books, 2010), now in its eighth edition.

 

* The 12 Essentials

 

Navigation (map and compass)

Sun protection (sunglasses and sunscreen)

Insulation (extra clothing)

Illumination (headlamp/flashlight)

First-aid supplies

Fire (waterproof matches/lighter/candles)

Repair kit and tools

Nutrition (extra food)

Hydration (extra water)

Emergency shelter

Communication (whistle/cell or satellite phone and/or, GMRS/FRS radio/ELB or SPOT®)

GPS (Global Positioning System)

 

Classic Ten Essentials:

Map

Compass

Sunglasses and sunscreen

Extra clothing

Headlamp/flashlight

First-aid supplies

Fire starter

Matches

Knife

Extra food

The idea of hunting the backcountry is increasingly appealing to many folks. Today, it seems everyone has a GPS unit and can travel for days over diverse country. But, what occurs when the GPS is inoperable or the batteries die? Do you know how to navigate without your GPS in country you’ve never been in or seen in daylight? How about when fog or snow sets in? How competent are you with a map and compass?

If we are going to travel in the backcountry away from modern conveniences then we need to know how to return to the trailhead. It means personal responsibility beyond the green gate. Make the effort to learn basic navigation skills, determining declination, finding north on a compass and returning to your vehicle. Learn these skills and the backcountry becomes an endless wilderness that has no boundaries.

As a former search and rescue volunteer, I remember a group that was lost in the Cascade Range of Oregon. They called 911 to report they were lost, and when an intervening Sheriff’s deputy asked if they had a GPS, the answer was, “Yes, but we don’t know how to use it!”

A year later a similar call to 911 revealed that this family still had not learned the basics of GPS operation, as they requested “rescue” again from nearly the same location. The point being: know your equipment and how to use it.

http://www.backcountryhunters.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=299&Itemid=123

 

***  Snowy Steps, Frozen Water

 

Snowshoe treks to winter waterfalls
Compiled by Kathryn Barnes

AMC Outdoors, January/February 2013

 

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/2013/getout/waterfall-hikes-winter-snowshoe.cfm?utm_source=amcoo&utm_medium=email&utm_content=member&utm_campaign=janamcoo

 

***  108 species spotted in annual bird count, but where are the diving ducks?

 

By Michael S. Rosenwald

The Washington Post

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/rosenwald-md/post/108-species-spotted-in-annual-bird-count-but-where-are-the-diving-ducks/2013/01/02/6a911f0a-54f2-11e2-8b9e-dd8773594efc_blog.html?wpisrc=nl_buzz

 

***  From the National Wildlife Federation:

 

5 Tips to Stay Warm Outside In Winter

 

It’s not bathing suit weather, but winter’s still a great season for outdoor fun. Be prepared!

 

By Anne Keisman

 

1. Dress in Layers: Wear several layers of clothing and peel them off if you get too warm. The heat captured in between the layers keeps you toasty. (Hint: mittens are warmer than gloves, because fingers retain more heat when they touch each other.)

2.Stay Dry: Nothing chills you like wet skin. Your base layer should be made of a material that wicks sweat away from your body. Popular fabrics include polypropylene and silk. Your outermost layer should be water- and wind-proof.

3.Keep Head, Neck, Hands and Feet Toasty: Your extremities let off the most heat — so keep them wrapped with warm scarves, hats, mittens or gloves, and thick socks!

4.Bring a Backpack: As you and the kids get hot on a hike or while playing outside, make sure you have a backpack to store their clothes they’ll want to peel off. Or, you can clip or tie damp clothing outside your pack to help them dry). When you get to your destination, have everybody put a layer back on to stay warm when they are not moving.

5.Feet First: Especially for snowy or icy conditions, get good boots that the kids can take on and off easily.

 

And when you get back inside, make some hot chocolate to warm you up! You can even prepare it before your adventure and carry it in a thermos.

 

MYTH BUSTER: Has anyone ever told you that if you don’t bundle up, you’ll catch a cold? False! You don’t catch a cold by going outside in cold weather or from going outside with wet hair. Viruses and bacteria cause colds and flu — spread by contact with infected people — not cold air.

 

Health risks of cold weather include hypothermia, which can be easily avoided if you dress smartly and use common sense.

 

Have fun out there!

 

http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/National-Wildlife/Outdoors/Archives/2010/5-Tips-to-Stay-Warm-During-A-Cold-Weather-Outdoor-Adventure.aspx?s_email_id=20121215_XYDO_ENG_BOT_December_Edition|STBot

 

***  The Eagle Lake & West Branch Railroad

 

There are not a lot of places in the world where you can be hiking through a remote wilderness and suddenly stumble upon rusting locomotives.

http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/outdoor-report/2013/01/23/

 

***  Reptiles Alive!

 

“Herps” topic of Friends of Dyke Marsh March 3, Alexandria, VA

 

The world of “herps” will be the focus of March 3 meeting of the Friends of Dyke Marsh. Caroline Seitz, Director of Reptiles Alive and a member of the Virginia Herpetology Society, will survey the world of “herps,” explain the basics and highlight today’s challenges. She will also report on the VHS’s herp survey of Dyke Marsh. The meeting is at 2 p.m. It is free and open to the public and will be held at the Huntley Meadows Park Visitor Center, 3701 Lockheed Boulevard, Alexandria 22306. About Caroline: “At five feet tall, she is more than capable of handling a giant python, capturing a crocodile or carrying a heavy tortoise,” says her website.

http://reptilesalive.com/aboutus/caroline_seitz.html

 

***  Vibrating Belt Uses GPS to Guide Cyclists By Tickling Them

 

Link to Press Trust of India article:

http://gadgets.ndtv.com/others/news/vibrating-belt-uses-gps-to-guide-cyclists-by-tickling-them-321253

 

(From Bernie Wagenblast’s TCN newsletter)

 

***  “Take it Outside!”

 

“Take it Outside!” is a Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands initiative designed to encourage Maine’s children and families to reconnect with nature.

 

The “Take it Outside!” website is your one-stop information source for year-round outdoor recreation opportunities in Maine.

 

You can find everything you need to “Take it Outside!” and have fun in the great Maine outdoors.

 

http://take-it-outside.com/index.html

 

***  User Review: Eagles Nest Outfitters Twilight LED Lights

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/eagles-nest-outfitters/twilight-led-lights/review/26368/

 

***  2013 Cocktail Trends

 

The year 2012 was the year of Negronis, barrel-aged cocktails and gin. But with cocktail culture flourishing in the US, and innovative bartenders coming up with new, spectacular drinks every day, those trends may soon be out of date. To find out what 2013 holds for the world of cocktails, bars and spirits, F&W interviewed bartenders from across the country, who predict a world of restrained and sophisticated low-alcohol cocktails, tequila at brunch and tableside drink service. Here, the top 15 trends in cocktails for the coming year.—Justine Sterling

 

http://www.foodandwine.com/slideshows/2013-cocktail-trends

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: January 2013
Colorado’s Rio Grande Trail
By Laura Stark

During Colorado’s silver mining boom more than a century ago, two railroads struggled for supremacy over the Roaring Forks Valley, in a competition to see which could first finish the tracks into Aspen and lay claim to the rich silver deposits there.

The strategy of the Colorado Midland Railroad was to take a shorter, but difficult route involving a large number of trestles and extensive tunneling through the Rocky Mountains. The Denver & Rio Grande Railroad’s method, which ultimately proved successful, was to construct a narrow-gauge railroad—which took less time and money to construct than standard gauge—over a longer, but less demanding route. The Denver & Rio Grande reached Aspen in 1887. Today, the Rio Grande Trail (named for the victor) runs through the rail corridor and, in some places, you can still see the old tracks and trestle bridges.

But that was not the last time the corridor was hotly contested. Since 2006, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC), supported by pro bono counsel Richard Allen with the law firm of Zuckert, Scoutt, & Rasenberger, has been involved in defending against a claim filed by one of the trail’s adjacent landowners against the government of the United States, seeking compensation for land they believe was “taken” as a result of the federal railbanking law. It is a case that deals with important legal principles for federally granted rights-of-way.

When the trail first grabbed our attention for a Trail of the Month feature more than 10 years ago, it was already a stunner at only seven miles long. Since then the rail-trail has blossomed, and now stretches 42 miles between the ski towns of Aspen and Glenwood Springs, with gorgeous views of the Roaring Fork River, the surrounding mountains and tall aspens that turn bright gold in the fall.

Gary Tennenbaum remembers our original story. It was published right around the time he began as stewardship and trails manager for Pitkin County Open Space and Trails, which is responsible for the county’s 18-mile stretch of the trail from Emma to Aspen. When asked about the trail’s development over the past decade, the first word that comes to Tennenbaum’s mind is “rapid.”

“After Pitkin County started to pave sections of the trail, it started a groundswell of community support,” says Tennenbaum. “People said ‘let’s get it paved and get it all connected.'”

Completed in 2008, the trail is managed by the Roaring Forks Transportation Authority (RFTA), working with partnering agencies like Pitkin County and the City of Aspen. The last big challenge to its development is to decide what to do with the four-mile section from Woody Creek to Aspen’s Stein Park. The gravel pathway here has been used as a trail since the 1960s, and some want to keep it that way. Others see it as the only part of the trail left unpaved and want a smooth ride, end-to-end.

“We’re looking at different options,” Tennenbaum says. “It’s a difficult area that’s very narrow with steep drop-offs. We’re having discussions with the community and, hopefully, will have a decision within the next three months.”

The decision is an important one as Woody Creek is one of the most popular stopping points on the trail. In this town made famous by legendary journalist and author Hunter S. Thompson, you’ll find the quirky and lively Woody Creek Tavern. The fame of the Woody Creek Tavern, frequently mentioned in Thompson’s writings, has made renting bikes in Aspen, pedaling eight miles along the scenic Rio Grande Trail and grabbing lunch at the tavern a popular summertime pursuit for both locals and tourists.

“The trail is a huge benefit for the Woody Creek Tavern,” says Tennenbaum. “They have full bike racks that the big cities don’t even have. In the summer, you’ll see more than a hundred bikes there.”

One thing you won’t find on the trail yet is interpretive signage about the history of the rail corridor. But this is something Tennenbaum hopes to pursue once a decision has been made on whether to pave the Woody Creek section. Presently, its history can be explored in the Glenwood Railroad Museum, only a half-mile from the trail’s western end. The museum, offering railroad artifacts, old photographs and a large-scale model railroad, is housed in the Glenwood Springs station, built in 1904 and still serving Amtrak trains today.

With its mining heydays long gone, the area is once again rich in unspoiled natural beauty. The trail closely parallels the Roaring Fork River for much of its length, and animals can often be spotted along its banks. This ready connection to wildlife is a special treat, especially for city dwellers. In the winter, the valley provides such a critical range for deer and elk that a small section of the trail between Basalt and Carbondale is closed annually from November to April and re-routed on the road.

“I think my most memorable experiences on the trail have been wildlife sightings,” says Austin Weiss, trail manager for the City of Aspen, who frequently trains for marathons on the trail. “It’s common to run into a black bear or deer or elk, and there are mountain lions in the area, too.” Around Rock Bottom Ranch, one of his favorite trail spots, he often sees heron and bald eagles.

When the rail corridor was purchased in 1997, one of the justifications was “creating recreation connectivity in the Roaring Forks Valley.” In that endeavor, the trail has been tremendously successful.

“The trail is a great way for communities to connect,” says Tennenbaum, who lives in Basalt and commutes on the trail. “I bump into people all the time. Our trail counters show that thousands and thousands of people use it.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Grassland Bird Technician, Nature Conservancy, Milnor, North Dakota

 

The Grassland Bird Technician (GBT) will be part of a study to evaluate the effects of grazing on grassland bird abundance/density and diversity in the Sheyenne River Delta of North Dakota, USA. Data collected will contribute to our knowledge of the impact of grazing on declining grassland bird populations. Start date is May 20, 2013 continuing through August 9, 2013, and housing will be provided. Primary job duties will include:

 

•Conduct bird surveys using point counts and distance sampling methods

 

•Assist with plant community and vegetation structure sampling

 

•Collect biomass data to assess forage production on sites with different grazing pressure

 

http://www.environmentjobs.com/green-jobs/grassland-bird-technician.41476.htm

 

2.)  River Clean Ups & Trail Maintenance, Guadalupe River Park Conservancy, San Jose CA

 

At least twice a year the Conservancy organizes river clean-up efforts in the area between Coleman Avenue and HWY 880. This is a great opportunity to meet with friends, co-workers or new friends who share an interest in maintaining the beauty of the river and protecting the natural habitat.  The award-winning 254 acre park, including 2.6 miles of trails, offers visitors an opportunity to explore nature, enjoy the many water features and playground areas, or travel the trails that meander through the park.  Volunteers can help the City of San Jose to maintain the areas of the trail on the 2.6 miles of trail from Hwy. 280 to 880. Projects could include weeding, planting, spread mulch, trimming trees, refurbish park benches, cleaning signs, etc.

 

http://www.grpg.org/volunteer

 

3.)  Trail Maintenance Volunteers, East Bay Regional Park District, Oakland, CA

 

In order to provide for visitor safety and to protect parkland resources, the Park District staff and trail volunteers provide a much-needed source of labor to repair and enhance existing trails and construct new narrow trails. Trail maintenance projects at various Regional Parks include helping with pruning, erosion control, post installation, trail improvements, and new trail construction. A great way to see the parks!

 

How to Volunteer?

 

If you wish to help with a particular project, you may Register Online or by calling the numbers listed in the schedule above at least three days prior to the event. If you have additional questions please call (510) 544-2631.

 

Youth under 18 years of age must bring a parent or other parent-designated adult over 18 yrs. old to work with on the trail projects. If there is a group of youth under age 18, one adult supervisor per five youth is required.

 

Regional Trails staff will assign participants to work teams supervised by EBRPD crew leaders. The work teams will break out into groups throughout the site. Trail workdays continue until about 12:30 or 1:00 p.m. Everyone then reunites for lunch and a wrap-up.

 

Be prepared for changing weather! Dress in layers and have appropriate clothing for light rain or to protect against full exposure to sun. Bring work gloves and wear sturdy boots or shoes, long pants and long-sleeved T-shirts. Bring drinking water, snacks, sunscreen, and a hat that will protect your ears and neck. If your sensitivity to poison oak is high, bring an extra change of clothes and shoes, and a plastic bag to take away your exposed or soiled work clothes. Irritants may include ticks, mosquitos, sunburn, and blisters. Special precautions for preventing poison oak exposure and reducing irritants will be explained on site.

 

Storm conditions or heavy rain will cancel events. To check for cancellation, call (510) 544-2631, on the morning of the event.

 

To volunteer, or for more information on the trail maintenance projects, contact: East Bay Regional Park District, Regional Trails Department, 2950 Peralta Oaks Court, P.O. Box 5381, Oakland, CA 94605-0381 or call (510) 544-2631.

 

If you would like to receive our bi-annual Ivan Dickson Volunteer Maintenance Program Newsletter, please call (510)544-2631 and leave the correct spelling of your name and mailing address.

 

Back to top

 

Why Be a Trail Volunteer?

 

If you like to hike, bike, or ride and enjoy well maintained trails, think about becoming a trail maintenance volunteer.

 

The East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD) manages more than 100,000 acres of land in 65 parks, and maintains 1,150 miles of trails. Maintenance and rehabilitation of the existing trails is an ongoing process (similar to repairing potholes on public roadways) and is required due to public use, annual vegetation growth, and other forces of nature, particularly from erosion caused by the flow of water over and adjacent to trails.

 

In order to provide for visitor safety and to protect parkland resources, EBRPD staff and volunteers provide a much-needed source of labor to repair and enhance existing trails and construct new narrow trails. In turn, the public learns concepts of land stewardship and resource conservation while giving back to the trails system they enjoy.

 

Typical tasks for the volunteers include installation of drainage structures, pruning, trail tread maintenance, and installation of special trail structures such as retaining walls, bridges, and causeways.

 

Volunteers use a variety of hand tools under the instruction of EBRPD staff. Participants can include anyone in good physical condition: children (10 years and older), teens, adults, and seniors.

 

Earn Respect, Credit and Appreciation for Community Service

 

In addition to interested individuals, trail maintenance volunteers come from schools, churches, Scout groups, corporate partnerships, public agencies, and various trail user organizations.

Students can earn four community service hours per event.

Girl Scouts have earned credit toward the Backpacking Merit Badge and the Eco-Action Merit Badge.

 

If you are interested, give us a call!

 

Ivan Dickson Trail Maintenance Program

 

History

 

Ivan Dickson was a member of the Berkeley Hiking Club since 1920 and was an active hiker well into his eighties. For more than 60 years, Ivan Dickson spent his free time hiking the trails of the East Bay Regional Park District.

 

When Mr. Dickson died in February 1993, at the age of 95, he left both a request and bequest to the East Bay Regional Park District to “take good care” of the trails that meant so much to him. In order to honor Ivan’s desire for trails to be well maintained, the District created a unique program for trail maintenance (current projects). The funds from his bequest are managed like an endowment, with the interest generated being used to sponsor and support volunteer maintenance projects throughout the Park District’s extensive trail system. The funds are allocated for materials, supplies, hand tools, food, and acknowledgments for the volunteers. By leveraging these funds for long-term growth, and by involving the public in a partnership dedicated to the preservation of trail resources through volunteer efforts, a perpetual trail maintenance program has been established to accommodate future generations of trail volunteers.

 

Since 1996, the Ivan Dickson Volunteer Trail Maintenance Program has managed 121 trail projects with 6,036 volunteers contributing 25,431 hours of volunteer labor.

 

How to Participate

 

Choose a Saturday date from the calendar of trail projects and mark your own calendar. Three to four weeks prior to the project, call the Park District’s recorded line (510) 544-2631 and request a flier for the specific date. Or you can register your name and phone number now by emailing info@ebparks.org. The flier you receive will include project specifics such as meeting place and time, project description, and any other special information. We ask that you register up to three days prior to the event. If you have particular questions, the recorded line will refer you to District staff.

 

Trail Maintenance Fund

 

Join us in building a Trail Maintenance Fund. Our goal is to build the Ivan Dickson Trail Maintenance Fund to $5,000,000! By doing so, we can guarantee a perpetual trail maintenance program for future generations. Financial contributions are tax-deductible and can be made to: EBRPD-Ivan Dickson Volunteer Trail Maintenance Program Fund, 2950 Peralta Oaks Court, Oakland, CA 94605.

 

http://www.ebparks.org/getinvolved/volunteer/trail

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Summer Program Instructor – Log Rolling, Office of Student Affairs, Twin Cities Campus, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN

https://employment.umn.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/position/JobDetails_css.jsp?postingId=592417

 

2.)  Projects Coordinator, Nepal, Zoological Society of London, Kathmandu and project sites, Nepal

 

The Zoological Society of London (ZSL), a charity founded in 1826, is a world-renowned centre of excellence for conservation science and applied conservation. ZSL’s mission is to promote and achieve the worldwide conservation of animals and their habitats. This is realised by carrying out field conservation and research in over 50 countries across the globe and through education and awareness-raising at our two zoos, ZSL London Zoo and ZSL Whipsnade Zoo, inspiring people to take conservation action.

 

ZSL in partnership with the National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC) has been active in the field of conservation in Nepal for more than 20 years. ZSL’s current focus in Nepal is on strengthening and increasing the capacity of Nepal’s existing wildlife department officials, young conservation biologists and communities.  Work includes monitoring and surveillance of rhino populations; strengthening metapopulation management; setting up standardised status reporting on each rhino population; developing a Terai grassland invasive species management programme; training field scientists in habitat assessment and control; implementing more effective human-wildlife conflict resolution approaches; coordinating the completion of the Red List of Nepal’s birds; and improving public engagement and integration of local communities, and other stakeholders in conservation efforts.

 

ZSL is recruiting a projects coordinator to oversee and coordinate this conservation work while also setting up a ZSL Nepal office. Responsibilities will include overseeing current project activities, fundraising, maintaining and building strategic partnerships to develop the Nepal programme, and developing and implementing new conservation projects. Success in these endeavours would lead to the position developing into a full country manager role over the next few years.

 

The ideal candidate will have a strong scientific background as well as excellent administrative, organizational, communication and interpersonal skills. They will also have a good understanding of current priorities in biodiversity conservation in the region, and experience working in the field, managing staff and budgets, and working collaboratively with different cultures, particularly in the Indian subcontinent.

 

Salary will be £21,090 pa. ZSL will also provide one international return flight to the UK (or other home country) per year, full medical emergency evacuation cover, visa fees and 30 days holiday per annum. The successful candidate will be based full time in Nepal, with time spent in Kathmandu and at the project sites as required. There will be occasional visits to ZSL’s UK office.

 

To apply for this position please send your CV and covering letter to the Human Resources Department at hr@zsl.org. The closing date for applications is 25th January, 2013. Interviews are expected to take place in the first week of February. The expected start date is at the end of February, 2013 or as close to that as possible.

http://www.environmentjobs.com/green-jobs/projects-coordinator-nepal.41489.htm

 

3.)  Development and Fundraising Volunteer Organization, Save The Bay, Oakland, California

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=377300028

 

4.)  Communications Assistant, Principles for Responsible Investment, London, England

 

MUST be National Residents / Valid Work Permit-holders.  Other applicants need not apply.

 

About the Principles for Responsible Investment

 

The Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) is an investor initiative in partnership with UNEP Finance Initiative and the UN Global Compact. Launched by UN Secretary- General Kofi Annan and subsequently endorsed by his successor Ban Ki-Moon, the PRI is a set of voluntary best practice principles to assist investors in integrating environmental, social and corporate governance issues into investment processes and ownership practices. The principles are supported by a Secretariat that promotes the PRI and provides implementation support to signatories. See www.unpri.org for further information.

 

Summary of the position

 

The Communications Assistant will support the PRI Communications team to deliver a number of new projects that have been prioritised for early 2013 relating to its new website, social media strategy, signatory webinars and general communications activity. The individual will gain exposure to a broad range of teams and activities within the PRI, including signatory relations and recruitment, implementation support, collaborative shareholder engagement, and reporting and assessment. This position will report to the Head of Communications.

 

Specific responsibilities include:

 

•Further developing and implementing the PRIs social media strategy, identifying and drawing  on best practice within its signatory base and peer organisations.

•Creating collateral to help new and existing signatories better communicate their involvement  with the PRI within their own organisations and with external audiences.

•Drafting articles for publication and providing general team support, including on signatory webinars, reporting and data entry.Requirements and likely experience

 

•Previous experience in a communications function, ideally within an investment institution.

•Strong research and writing skills, with excellent spelling and grammar.

•Interest in responsible investment and ESG issues will be highly regarded.

•Must be eligible to work in the UK.

 

http://www.environmentjobs.com/green-jobs/communications-assistant.41484.htm

 

***  From Sue Bumpous:

 

For both Job of the Week and Your Next Step newsletters – When I changed jobs, I seem to have fallen off the mailing list for both (even though I did not change email addresses)  but will add myself back on.

5.)  Executive Director, Outdoor Writers Association of America

 

OWAA Initiates Search For New Executive Director

The Outdoor Writers Association of America, the nation’s oldest and largest association of professional outdoors-focused communicators, is seeking a new executive director.

The 1,000-member association, formed in 1927 at a meeting of the Izaak Walton League of America, counts among its members the nation’s foremost outdoor writers, photographers, artists and broadcasters.

Current OWAA Executive Director Robin Giner submitted her resignation in November. Giner, who began her affiliation with OWAA in 2001, assumed the role of executive director in 2010. She plans to embark on a career more closely aligned with her agricultural roots.

“During her tenure with the organization Giner helped navigate OWAA through difficult times as it confronted challenges facing the entire media industry,” said OWAA President Mark Taylor, outdoors editor of The Roanoke (Va.) Times.

“However, this presents us with an opportunity to find a new director with the special vision and skills needed to keep moving us forward.”

An eight-member committee of OWAA officers and individual members is heading up the recruiting effort.

In the past, the organization’s leaders felt strongly that the position should be based in Missoula, Mont., current location of OWAA headquarters. That requirement has been adjusted to accommodate skilled individuals who might not find it possible to relocate.

“Our priority is finding a skilled, experienced leader who is familiar with the outdoors industry and outdoors-related communication,” Taylor said. “We are trying to do everything we can to ensure that our pool of candidates is as good as it possibly can be.”

The application deadline for the position is Jan. 21, 2013.

View the complete position description.

 

6.)  Executive Director, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers (BHA), Joseph, OR (position location is flexible)


Backcountry Hunters & Anglers Seeks Executive Director

Position: Executive Director Status: Full time

Description:

Founded around an Oregon campfire in 2004, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers (BHA) seeks to ensure America’s outdoor heritage of hunting and fishing through education and work on behalf of wild public lands and waters. Our strength and inspiration are rooted in the passion and knowledge of our grassroots membership representing the interests of sportsmen and women in nearly all fifty states. In the ever expanding and technological world in which we live, there is a need and a longing to return to the natural world and experience the wonders provided by wild public lands. With our natural resources facing unprecedented challenges and threats, it is our responsibility to advocate for meaningful conservation policies that protect the health and integrity of wild backcountry landscapes for future generations.

BHA is looking for a dynamic Executive Director (ED) with the passion, experience, and energy necessary to lead the organization forward and strengthen its commitment to protecting fish and wildlife habitat and increasing opportunity and access to quality hunting and fishing. Working closely with the Board of directors, state chapter leaders and staff, the ED will be responsible for all aspects of organizational management while establishing concrete goals and objectives to guide BHA’s strategic conservation vision.

Leadership qualifications:

-Avid hunter/angler/conservationist with a deep understanding of America’s western heritage and a passion for its backcountry hunting and fishing culture.

-Ability to represent the organization publicly with the media, elected officials and other policymakers to raise the profile of BHA nationally while maintaining its reputation and influence.

-Excellent communication skills capable of delivering compelling and articulate written and verbal messages.

-Experienced in managing organizations (especially nonprofits) and supervising, inspiring, and motivating paid staff and volunteers.

-Financial oversight experience, including banking, insurance, and taxation for nonprofits.

-Enthusiasm for fundraising and demonstrated ability to cultivate development relationships.

-Demonstrated experience in conflict resolution and convening divergent interests to advance BHA’s mission and promote meaningful conservation policies.

-Ability to work in a self-directed and disciplined manner.

-Understanding of land use management policies involving public land, wildlife, and water and the ability to engage BHA members, grassroots leaders, and advocates to advance conservation priorities and opportunities for hunting and fishing.

-Undergraduate degree required; advanced degrees a plus.

Responsibilities:

-Work closely with the Board of Directors to set the organization’s strategic direction and facilitate effective engagement opportunities for BHA’s members and volunteers.

-Initiate regular conference calls and in-person meetings with the Board of Directors, relevant committees of the Board, and with the leadership of state chapters.

-Organize volunteers and oversee contractors to help achieve specific policy objectives, educate members and public audiences about public land conservation, particularly protecting backcountry public lands and other core habitat, and free-flowing rivers, while supporting campaigns spear-headed by state chapters.

-Direct development and fundraising efforts to increase resources, enhance membership programs, diversify funding sources, and cultivate relationships with foundations, major donors, and supporters to keep BHA financially solvent and growing. This includes writing grants and progress reports, working with staff to hold fundraisers and special events like our annual Rendezvous.

-Working with the staff, Board, Board Chair, and Treasurer, secure a reliable cash flow and provide wise stewardship of economic assets. Communicate with major donors, prospects, accountants, and the Board about appropriate aspects of BHA’s finances.

-Administer grants, conservation campaigns, and related accountability systems to ensure that deliverables are met and staff/contractors are efficiently managed.

-Develop business operation systems to manage budgets, human resources, membership programs, strengthen state chapters, and complement board development.

-Provide guidance to BHA’s state chapters, strengthen capacity, help build new chapters, and serve as conduit between the Board, staff, and chapters.

-Communicate regularly with members to keep our “boots on the ground” volunteers enthused, inspired, and informed about BHA activities.

-Serve as the primary point of contact with media interests, increase BHA’s influence with decision makers and core audiences, and elevate public awareness of BHA with strategic constituents.

-Contribute content to the Backcountry Journal, help publish email alerts and other on-line outreach messages, and maintain consistency across all communications platforms.

The position location is flexible. Proximity to a large regional airport is important. The majority of BHA’s priorities are on public lands throughout the West and Alaska. Travel (including driving) is expected. Willingness to work non-traditional hours and weekends is required.

Compensation will reflect the professional nature of this complex and challenging position and the experience level of the candidate.

To apply, submit resume, cover letter, and writing sample by January 31, 2013 to rcaslar@backcountryhunters.org.

 

7.)  Manager, Major Donor Communications, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=363900011

 

8.)  Development Coordinator, Defenders of Wildlife, Washington, DC

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=25271

 

9.)  Federal Lands Policy Analyst, Defenders of Wildlife, Washington, DC

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=25272

 

10.)  Vice President and Executive Director, Audubon Vermont National Audubon Society Huntington, Vermont

 

For more than a century, Audubon has championed the protection of birds and their habitat. Audubon’s mission is to conserve and restore natural ecosystems, focusing on birds, other wildlife, and their habitats, for the benefit of humanity and the Earth’s biological diversity. With nearly 700 staff, 23 state programs, 465 local chapters, 43 centers and sanctuaries, and close to half a million members throughout the United States, Audubon achieves its mission by engaging people in bird conservation on a hemispheric scale through science, policy, education, and on-the-ground conservation action.

In the fall of 2011, Audubon adopted a new strategic plan to renew the organization’s focus on the biggest and most important opportunities for addressing critical threats to birds and their habitat. At the core of this plan is a focus on flyways: Each year, more than 10 billion birds use major flyways to travel up and down the continent and to points beyond. Underneath these flyways are migratory rest stops and the homes for non-migratory birds that are critical to birds’ survival. These places form a web that represents the richest veins of biodiversity across the Americas. They are the tipping point places that connect people to birds and ecosystems—and where birds thrive, people prosper. By mobilizing and aligning Audubon’s unparalleled network of chapters, centers, state programs, and Important Bird Area (IBA) programs to focus on the four major migratory flyways in the Americas (Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific), the organization will bring the full power of Audubon to bear on protecting common and threatened bird species and the critical habitat they need to survive. Within each flyway, Audubon will sharpen its focus on the most critical species and places, working only where there is a theory of victory for delivering measurable conservation impact at scale. As part of BirdLife International, Audubon will join people in more than 100 countries working to protect a network of IBAs around the world, leveraging the impact of actions they take at a local level. Critical to Audubon’s conservation success will be engaging a growing and more diverse audience to take conservation action.

Position Summary:

Audubon seeks an Executive Director to build on Audubon Vermont’s rich history and expand its contributions to conservation in Vermont and the Atlantic Flyway, leading the organization to its next level of programmatic and financial success. This is a high-profile, pivotal opportunity for a dynamic conservation professional. As one of Audubon’s state programs with a significant leadership role in the Atlantic Flyway, an annual budget of $800,000 and a staff of 12, Audubon Vermont uses its statewide Forest Bird and Champlain Valley Bird conservation initiatives, educational programming, the Green Mountain Audubon Center, its four sanctuaries, seven affiliated local Audubon Chapters, and 3,000 grassroots members to protect birds and their habitats. The successful candidate will have the passion and leadership skills necessary to articulate, develop, and implement Audubon’s conservation goals and strategies in the state, while maintaining its leadership role in the flyway by working closely with the Audubon Vermont Board and staff, and the Vice President of the Atlantic Flyway to align the state program with strategic regional and national priorities. The Executive Director will hold the title of Vice President within the national organization and will report to the VP Atlantic Flyway; s/he will be jointly reviewed by the VP Atlantic Flyway and Audubon Vermont Board each year.

Audubon offers an excellent benefits package and a competitive salary that is commensurate with experience. This position will be located in Huntington, Vermont at the Green Mountain Audubon Center.

Essential Functions:

The Vice President/Executive Director, Audubon Vermont, will perform the following and other duties as assigned:

Strategy Development and Organizational Leadership

• Complete the development and lead the implementation of a five-year strategic plan for Audubon Vermont to grow the organization’s capacity across the state to achieve conservation of priority birds and their habitats.

• Provide leadership, management, and mentoring to a staff of 12 including a team of dedicated program directors in the areas of science, policy, and education to reach the goals set out by the National Strategic Plan as they relate to Vermont and the Green Mountain Audubon Center.

• Have a clear vision, passion, and commitment to leveraging the Green Mountain Audubon Center as a hub for education, science, and demonstration that is clearly and strategically integrated with state and flyway initiatives.

• Manage the day to day operations of the state, including setting financial and programmatic goals, analyzing results, and taking corrective actions, in close collaboration with Audubon Vermont’s program directors.

Fundraising and External Relations

• Lead Audubon Vermont’s fundraising, working closely with Audubon Vermont’s development staff and program directors, the VP of the Atlantic Flyway, and the Chief Development Officer of the National Audubon Society to cultivate and solicit major donors and foundations for Audubon Vermont and Atlantic Flyway initiatives of which Audubon Vermont is a part to significantly increase contributions from diverse stakeholders.

• Represent and raise the profile and visibility of Audubon Vermont externally to funders, partners, policymakers, and the public.

• Work closely with the Audubon Vermont Board to support their efforts in continuing the development of a strong statewide organization through fundraising, program development, and conservation advocacy.

• Inspire and provide guidance to Audubon Vermont chapters to help them realize their potential for on-the-ground conservation and education, as well as within the larger organization’s Atlantic Flyway infrastructure. Work with the Chapter Assembly to strengthen the statewide presence of Audubon and support these organizations in their local efforts.

• Engage Vermont’s growing diverse population through strategic outreach efforts.

• Expand the geographic reach of Audubon Vermont programs both within the state and across the Atlantic Flyway.

Qualifications and Experience:

The successful candidate will have the following qualifications:

• Strong leadership skills, including an engaging and energetic demeanor and the ability to inspire and motivate staff, volunteers, donors, and potential partners

• 7-10 years of experience (preferably in the non-profit sector), including 5 years at a senior management level with comparable staff and budget responsibilities

• Proven success in fundraising, in particular extensive experience with major donors, foundations, corporations, and government funders

• Experience managing institutional growth and change within a decentralized organization highly desirable

• Strategic thinker with the ability to transfer vision and strategy into aligned and effective programs and activities

• Demonstrated ability to partner with key stakeholders, such as Boards of Directors and management teams, all while acting as an ambassador for Audubon Vermont

• Outstanding interpersonal skills, judgment, and an ability to collaborate and build coalitions with a wide range of individuals and organizations at the local, regional, and national levels

• Persuasive communication skills and the ability to effectively represent Audubon Vermont to its members, state and federal elected officials, donors, and chapters leaders, as well as in traditional and social media

• Knowledge and appreciation of Vermont and its environment, its conservation and political history, and the role of science in developing conservation strategies, strongly preferred, as well as an understanding of the role that science, policy, and education cooperatively play in achieving conservation goals and outcomes

• Willingness and ability to travel routinely throughout the state and nationally, as required

• Knowledge of basic accounting protocols and ability to review finances with others to build consensus around priorities and monitor ongoing expenditures

• Bachelor’s degree required, advanced degree in a relevant field preferred

To Apply:

Candidates should apply directly online at: https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1572/vice-president-and-state-executive-director%2c-audubon-vermont/job

 

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=25216

 

11.)  Outdoors Show Internship (Non-Paid, for Academic Credit), KSL Television, Bonneville Communications, Salt Lake City, UT

http://www.ksl.com/web/joblisting.php?file=1312161011.cur

 

12.)  Center Director, Richardson Bay Audubon Center and Sanctuary, Audubon, Tiburon, California

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=405000018

 

13.)  Outreach Coordinator, National Audubon Society, Inc., Oyster Bay, NY

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1588/outreach-coordinator/job

 

14.)  Half-Time Executive Director, Bike&Walk Montclair, Montclair, New Jersey

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=402900009

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

 

 
By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Home is where one starts from.”

– T. S. Eliot

 

“In solitude, where we are least alone.”

-Lord Byron

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

Subscribe for free. Send a blank email to:
yourverynextstep-subscribe@topica.com.

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 650 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our website (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:

***  New ChargePoint Mobile App Shows Every US Charging Station

***  Snowy Steps, Frozen Water

***  108 species spotted in annual bird count, but where are the diving ducks?

***  5 Tips to Stay Warm Outside In Winter

***  The Eagle Lake & West Branch Railroad

***  Reptiles Alive!

***  Vibrating Belt Uses GPS to Guide Cyclists By Tickling Them

***  “Take it Outside!”

***  User Review: Eagles Nest Outfitters Twilight LED Lights

***  2013 Cocktail Trends

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Grassland Bird Technician, Nature Conservancy, Milnor, North Dakota

2.)  River Clean Ups & Trail Maintenance, Guadalupe River Park Conservancy, San Jose CA

3.)  Trail Maintenance Volunteers, East Bay Regional Park District, Oakland, CA

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Summer Program Instructor – Log Rolling, Office of Student Affairs, Twin Cities Campus, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN

2.)  Projects Coordinator, Nepal, Zoological Society of London, Kathmandu and project sites, Nepal

3.)  Development and Fundraising Volunteer Organization, Save The Bay, Oakland, California

4.)  Communications Assistant, Principles for Responsible Investment, London, England

5.)  Executive Director, Outdoor Writers Association of America

6.)  Executive Director, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers (BHA), Joseph, OR (position location is flexible)

7.)  Manager, Major Donor Communications, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York

8.)  Development Coordinator, Defenders of Wildlife, Washington, DC

9.)  Federal Lands Policy Analyst, Defenders of Wildlife, Washington, DC

10.)  Vice President and Executive Director, Audubon Vermont National Audubon Society Huntington, Vermont

11.)  Outdoors Show Internship (Non-Paid, for Academic Credit), KSL Television, Bonneville Communications, Salt Lake City, UT

12.)  Center Director, Richardson Bay Audubon Center and Sanctuary, Audubon, Tiburon, California

13.)  Outreach Coordinator, National Audubon Society, Inc., Oyster Bay, NY

14.)  Half-Time Executive Director, Bike&Walk Montclair, Montclair, New Jersey

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  New ChargePoint Mobile App Shows Every US Charging Station

 

From Bernie Wagenblast’s Transportation Communications Newsletter, with a link to article on Green Car Reports:

http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1081356_new-chargepoint-mobile-app-shows-every-u-s-charging-station

 

 

***  Snowy Steps, Frozen Water

 

Snowshoe treks to winter waterfalls
Compiled by Kathryn Barnes

AMC Outdoors, January/February 2013

 

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/2013/getout/waterfall-hikes-winter-snowshoe.cfm?utm_source=amcoo&utm_medium=email&utm_content=member&utm_campaign=janamcoo

 

***  108 species spotted in annual bird count, but where are the diving ducks?

 

By Michael S. Rosenwald

The Washington Post

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/rosenwald-md/post/108-species-spotted-in-annual-bird-count-but-where-are-the-diving-ducks/2013/01/02/6a911f0a-54f2-11e2-8b9e-dd8773594efc_blog.html?wpisrc=nl_buzz

 

***  From the National Wildlife Federation:

 

5 Tips to Stay Warm Outside In Winter

 

It’s not bathing suit weather, but winter’s still a great season for outdoor fun. Be prepared!

 

By Anne Keisman

 

1. Dress in Layers: Wear several layers of clothing and peel them off if you get too warm. The heat captured in between the layers keeps you toasty. (Hint: mittens are warmer than gloves, because fingers retain more heat when they touch each other.)

2.Stay Dry: Nothing chills you like wet skin. Your base layer should be made of a material that wicks sweat away from your body. Popular fabrics include polypropylene and silk. Your outermost layer should be water- and wind-proof.

3.Keep Head, Neck, Hands and Feet Toasty: Your extremities let off the most heat — so keep them wrapped with warm scarves, hats, mittens or gloves, and thick socks!

4.Bring a Backpack: As you and the kids get hot on a hike or while playing outside, make sure you have a backpack to store their clothes they’ll want to peel off. Or, you can clip or tie damp clothing outside your pack to help them dry). When you get to your destination, have everybody put a layer back on to stay warm when they are not moving.

5.Feet First: Especially for snowy or icy conditions, get good boots that the kids can take on and off easily.

 

And when you get back inside, make some hot chocolate to warm you up! You can even prepare it before your adventure and carry it in a thermos.

 

MYTH BUSTER: Has anyone ever told you that if you don’t bundle up, you’ll catch a cold? False! You don’t catch a cold by going outside in cold weather or from going outside with wet hair. Viruses and bacteria cause colds and flu — spread by contact with infected people — not cold air.

 

Health risks of cold weather include hypothermia, which can be easily avoided if you dress smartly and use common sense.

 

Have fun out there!

 

http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/National-Wildlife/Outdoors/Archives/2010/5-Tips-to-Stay-Warm-During-A-Cold-Weather-Outdoor-Adventure.aspx?s_email_id=20121215_XYDO_ENG_BOT_December_Edition|STBot

 

***  The Eagle Lake & West Branch Railroad

 

There are not a lot of places in the world where you can be hiking through a remote wilderness and suddenly stumble upon rusting locomotives.

http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/outdoor-report/2013/01/23/

 

***  Reptiles Alive!

 

“Herps” topic of Friends of Dyke Marsh March 3, Alexandria, VA

 

The world of “herps” will be the focus of March 3 meeting of the Friends of Dyke Marsh. Caroline Seitz, Director of Reptiles Alive and a member of the Virginia Herpetology Society, will survey the world of “herps,” explain the basics and highlight today’s challenges. She will also report on the VHS’s herp survey of Dyke Marsh. The meeting is at 2 p.m. It is free and open to the public and will be held at the Huntley Meadows Park Visitor Center, 3701 Lockheed Boulevard, Alexandria 22306. About Caroline: “At five feet tall, she is more than capable of handling a giant python, capturing a crocodile or carrying a heavy tortoise,” says her website.

http://reptilesalive.com/aboutus/caroline_seitz.html

 

***  Vibrating Belt Uses GPS to Guide Cyclists By Tickling Them

 

Link to Press Trust of India article:

http://gadgets.ndtv.com/others/news/vibrating-belt-uses-gps-to-guide-cyclists-by-tickling-them-321253

 

(From Bernie Wagenblast’s TCN newsletter)

 

***  “Take it Outside!”

 

“Take it Outside!” is a Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands initiative designed to encourage Maine’s children and families to reconnect with nature.

 

The “Take it Outside!” website is your one-stop information source for year-round outdoor recreation opportunities in Maine.

 

You can find everything you need to “Take it Outside!” and have fun in the great Maine outdoors.

 

http://take-it-outside.com/index.html

 

***  User Review: Eagles Nest Outfitters Twilight LED Lights

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/eagles-nest-outfitters/twilight-led-lights/review/26368/

 

***  2013 Cocktail Trends

 

The year 2012 was the year of Negronis, barrel-aged cocktails and gin. But with cocktail culture flourishing in the US, and innovative bartenders coming up with new, spectacular drinks every day, those trends may soon be out of date. To find out what 2013 holds for the world of cocktails, bars and spirits, F&W interviewed bartenders from across the country, who predict a world of restrained and sophisticated low-alcohol cocktails, tequila at brunch and tableside drink service. Here, the top 15 trends in cocktails for the coming year.—Justine Sterling

 

http://www.foodandwine.com/slideshows/2013-cocktail-trends

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: January 2013
Colorado’s Rio Grande Trail
By Laura Stark

During Colorado’s silver mining boom more than a century ago, two railroads struggled for supremacy over the Roaring Forks Valley, in a competition to see which could first finish the tracks into Aspen and lay claim to the rich silver deposits there.

The strategy of the Colorado Midland Railroad was to take a shorter, but difficult route involving a large number of trestles and extensive tunneling through the Rocky Mountains. The Denver & Rio Grande Railroad’s method, which ultimately proved successful, was to construct a narrow-gauge railroad—which took less time and money to construct than standard gauge—over a longer, but less demanding route. The Denver & Rio Grande reached Aspen in 1887. Today, the Rio Grande Trail (named for the victor) runs through the rail corridor and, in some places, you can still see the old tracks and trestle bridges.

But that was not the last time the corridor was hotly contested. Since 2006, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC), supported by pro bono counsel Richard Allen with the law firm of Zuckert, Scoutt, & Rasenberger, has been involved in defending against a claim filed by one of the trail’s adjacent landowners against the government of the United States, seeking compensation for land they believe was “taken” as a result of the federal railbanking law. It is a case that deals with important legal principles for federally granted rights-of-way.

When the trail first grabbed our attention for a Trail of the Month feature more than 10 years ago, it was already a stunner at only seven miles long. Since then the rail-trail has blossomed, and now stretches 42 miles between the ski towns of Aspen and Glenwood Springs, with gorgeous views of the Roaring Fork River, the surrounding mountains and tall aspens that turn bright gold in the fall.

Gary Tennenbaum remembers our original story. It was published right around the time he began as stewardship and trails manager for Pitkin County Open Space and Trails, which is responsible for the county’s 18-mile stretch of the trail from Emma to Aspen. When asked about the trail’s development over the past decade, the first word that comes to Tennenbaum’s mind is “rapid.”

“After Pitkin County started to pave sections of the trail, it started a groundswell of community support,” says Tennenbaum. “People said ‘let’s get it paved and get it all connected.'”

Completed in 2008, the trail is managed by the Roaring Forks Transportation Authority (RFTA), working with partnering agencies like Pitkin County and the City of Aspen. The last big challenge to its development is to decide what to do with the four-mile section from Woody Creek to Aspen’s Stein Park. The gravel pathway here has been used as a trail since the 1960s, and some want to keep it that way. Others see it as the only part of the trail left unpaved and want a smooth ride, end-to-end.

“We’re looking at different options,” Tennenbaum says. “It’s a difficult area that’s very narrow with steep drop-offs. We’re having discussions with the community and, hopefully, will have a decision within the next three months.”

The decision is an important one as Woody Creek is one of the most popular stopping points on the trail. In this town made famous by legendary journalist and author Hunter S. Thompson, you’ll find the quirky and lively Woody Creek Tavern. The fame of the Woody Creek Tavern, frequently mentioned in Thompson’s writings, has made renting bikes in Aspen, pedaling eight miles along the scenic Rio Grande Trail and grabbing lunch at the tavern a popular summertime pursuit for both locals and tourists.

“The trail is a huge benefit for the Woody Creek Tavern,” says Tennenbaum. “They have full bike racks that the big cities don’t even have. In the summer, you’ll see more than a hundred bikes there.”

One thing you won’t find on the trail yet is interpretive signage about the history of the rail corridor. But this is something Tennenbaum hopes to pursue once a decision has been made on whether to pave the Woody Creek section. Presently, its history can be explored in the Glenwood Railroad Museum, only a half-mile from the trail’s western end. The museum, offering railroad artifacts, old photographs and a large-scale model railroad, is housed in the Glenwood Springs station, built in 1904 and still serving Amtrak trains today.

With its mining heydays long gone, the area is once again rich in unspoiled natural beauty. The trail closely parallels the Roaring Fork River for much of its length, and animals can often be spotted along its banks. This ready connection to wildlife is a special treat, especially for city dwellers. In the winter, the valley provides such a critical range for deer and elk that a small section of the trail between Basalt and Carbondale is closed annually from November to April and re-routed on the road.

“I think my most memorable experiences on the trail have been wildlife sightings,” says Austin Weiss, trail manager for the City of Aspen, who frequently trains for marathons on the trail. “It’s common to run into a black bear or deer or elk, and there are mountain lions in the area, too.” Around Rock Bottom Ranch, one of his favorite trail spots, he often sees heron and bald eagles.

When the rail corridor was purchased in 1997, one of the justifications was “creating recreation connectivity in the Roaring Forks Valley.” In that endeavor, the trail has been tremendously successful.

“The trail is a great way for communities to connect,” says Tennenbaum, who lives in Basalt and commutes on the trail. “I bump into people all the time. Our trail counters show that thousands and thousands of people use it.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Grassland Bird Technician, Nature Conservancy, Milnor, North Dakota

 

The Grassland Bird Technician (GBT) will be part of a study to evaluate the effects of grazing on grassland bird abundance/density and diversity in the Sheyenne River Delta of North Dakota, USA. Data collected will contribute to our knowledge of the impact of grazing on declining grassland bird populations. Start date is May 20, 2013 continuing through August 9, 2013, and housing will be provided. Primary job duties will include:

 

•Conduct bird surveys using point counts and distance sampling methods

 

•Assist with plant community and vegetation structure sampling

 

•Collect biomass data to assess forage production on sites with different grazing pressure

 

http://www.environmentjobs.com/green-jobs/grassland-bird-technician.41476.htm

 

2.)  River Clean Ups & Trail Maintenance, Guadalupe River Park Conservancy, San Jose CA

 

At least twice a year the Conservancy organizes river clean-up efforts in the area between Coleman Avenue and HWY 880. This is a great opportunity to meet with friends, co-workers or new friends who share an interest in maintaining the beauty of the river and protecting the natural habitat.  The award-winning 254 acre park, including 2.6 miles of trails, offers visitors an opportunity to explore nature, enjoy the many water features and playground areas, or travel the trails that meander through the park.  Volunteers can help the City of San Jose to maintain the areas of the trail on the 2.6 miles of trail from Hwy. 280 to 880. Projects could include weeding, planting, spread mulch, trimming trees, refurbish park benches, cleaning signs, etc.

 

http://www.grpg.org/volunteer

 

3.)  Trail Maintenance Volunteers, East Bay Regional Park District, Oakland, CA

 

In order to provide for visitor safety and to protect parkland resources, the Park District staff and trail volunteers provide a much-needed source of labor to repair and enhance existing trails and construct new narrow trails. Trail maintenance projects at various Regional Parks include helping with pruning, erosion control, post installation, trail improvements, and new trail construction. A great way to see the parks!

 

How to Volunteer?

 

If you wish to help with a particular project, you may Register Online or by calling the numbers listed in the schedule above at least three days prior to the event. If you have additional questions please call (510) 544-2631.

 

Youth under 18 years of age must bring a parent or other parent-designated adult over 18 yrs. old to work with on the trail projects. If there is a group of youth under age 18, one adult supervisor per five youth is required.

 

Regional Trails staff will assign participants to work teams supervised by EBRPD crew leaders. The work teams will break out into groups throughout the site. Trail workdays continue until about 12:30 or 1:00 p.m. Everyone then reunites for lunch and a wrap-up.

 

Be prepared for changing weather! Dress in layers and have appropriate clothing for light rain or to protect against full exposure to sun. Bring work gloves and wear sturdy boots or shoes, long pants and long-sleeved T-shirts. Bring drinking water, snacks, sunscreen, and a hat that will protect your ears and neck. If your sensitivity to poison oak is high, bring an extra change of clothes and shoes, and a plastic bag to take away your exposed or soiled work clothes. Irritants may include ticks, mosquitos, sunburn, and blisters. Special precautions for preventing poison oak exposure and reducing irritants will be explained on site.

 

Storm conditions or heavy rain will cancel events. To check for cancellation, call (510) 544-2631, on the morning of the event.

 

To volunteer, or for more information on the trail maintenance projects, contact: East Bay Regional Park District, Regional Trails Department, 2950 Peralta Oaks Court, P.O. Box 5381, Oakland, CA 94605-0381 or call (510) 544-2631.

 

If you would like to receive our bi-annual Ivan Dickson Volunteer Maintenance Program Newsletter, please call (510)544-2631 and leave the correct spelling of your name and mailing address.

 

Back to top

 

Why Be a Trail Volunteer?

 

If you like to hike, bike, or ride and enjoy well maintained trails, think about becoming a trail maintenance volunteer.

 

The East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD) manages more than 100,000 acres of land in 65 parks, and maintains 1,150 miles of trails. Maintenance and rehabilitation of the existing trails is an ongoing process (similar to repairing potholes on public roadways) and is required due to public use, annual vegetation growth, and other forces of nature, particularly from erosion caused by the flow of water over and adjacent to trails.

 

In order to provide for visitor safety and to protect parkland resources, EBRPD staff and volunteers provide a much-needed source of labor to repair and enhance existing trails and construct new narrow trails. In turn, the public learns concepts of land stewardship and resource conservation while giving back to the trails system they enjoy.

 

Typical tasks for the volunteers include installation of drainage structures, pruning, trail tread maintenance, and installation of special trail structures such as retaining walls, bridges, and causeways.

 

Volunteers use a variety of hand tools under the instruction of EBRPD staff. Participants can include anyone in good physical condition: children (10 years and older), teens, adults, and seniors.

 

Earn Respect, Credit and Appreciation for Community Service

 

In addition to interested individuals, trail maintenance volunteers come from schools, churches, Scout groups, corporate partnerships, public agencies, and various trail user organizations.

Students can earn four community service hours per event.

Girl Scouts have earned credit toward the Backpacking Merit Badge and the Eco-Action Merit Badge.

 

If you are interested, give us a call!

 

Ivan Dickson Trail Maintenance Program

 

History

 

Ivan Dickson was a member of the Berkeley Hiking Club since 1920 and was an active hiker well into his eighties. For more than 60 years, Ivan Dickson spent his free time hiking the trails of the East Bay Regional Park District.

 

When Mr. Dickson died in February 1993, at the age of 95, he left both a request and bequest to the East Bay Regional Park District to “take good care” of the trails that meant so much to him. In order to honor Ivan’s desire for trails to be well maintained, the District created a unique program for trail maintenance (current projects). The funds from his bequest are managed like an endowment, with the interest generated being used to sponsor and support volunteer maintenance projects throughout the Park District’s extensive trail system. The funds are allocated for materials, supplies, hand tools, food, and acknowledgments for the volunteers. By leveraging these funds for long-term growth, and by involving the public in a partnership dedicated to the preservation of trail resources through volunteer efforts, a perpetual trail maintenance program has been established to accommodate future generations of trail volunteers.

 

Since 1996, the Ivan Dickson Volunteer Trail Maintenance Program has managed 121 trail projects with 6,036 volunteers contributing 25,431 hours of volunteer labor.

 

How to Participate

 

Choose a Saturday date from the calendar of trail projects and mark your own calendar. Three to four weeks prior to the project, call the Park District’s recorded line (510) 544-2631 and request a flier for the specific date. Or you can register your name and phone number now by emailing info@ebparks.org. The flier you receive will include project specifics such as meeting place and time, project description, and any other special information. We ask that you register up to three days prior to the event. If you have particular questions, the recorded line will refer you to District staff.

 

Trail Maintenance Fund

 

Join us in building a Trail Maintenance Fund. Our goal is to build the Ivan Dickson Trail Maintenance Fund to $5,000,000! By doing so, we can guarantee a perpetual trail maintenance program for future generations. Financial contributions are tax-deductible and can be made to: EBRPD-Ivan Dickson Volunteer Trail Maintenance Program Fund, 2950 Peralta Oaks Court, Oakland, CA 94605.

 

http://www.ebparks.org/getinvolved/volunteer/trail

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Summer Program Instructor – Log Rolling, Office of Student Affairs, Twin Cities Campus, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN

https://employment.umn.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/position/JobDetails_css.jsp?postingId=592417

 

2.)  Projects Coordinator, Nepal, Zoological Society of London, Kathmandu and project sites, Nepal

 

The Zoological Society of London (ZSL), a charity founded in 1826, is a world-renowned centre of excellence for conservation science and applied conservation. ZSL’s mission is to promote and achieve the worldwide conservation of animals and their habitats. This is realised by carrying out field conservation and research in over 50 countries across the globe and through education and awareness-raising at our two zoos, ZSL London Zoo and ZSL Whipsnade Zoo, inspiring people to take conservation action.

 

ZSL in partnership with the National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC) has been active in the field of conservation in Nepal for more than 20 years. ZSL’s current focus in Nepal is on strengthening and increasing the capacity of Nepal’s existing wildlife department officials, young conservation biologists and communities.  Work includes monitoring and surveillance of rhino populations; strengthening metapopulation management; setting up standardised status reporting on each rhino population; developing a Terai grassland invasive species management programme; training field scientists in habitat assessment and control; implementing more effective human-wildlife conflict resolution approaches; coordinating the completion of the Red List of Nepal’s birds; and improving public engagement and integration of local communities, and other stakeholders in conservation efforts.

 

ZSL is recruiting a projects coordinator to oversee and coordinate this conservation work while also setting up a ZSL Nepal office. Responsibilities will include overseeing current project activities, fundraising, maintaining and building strategic partnerships to develop the Nepal programme, and developing and implementing new conservation projects. Success in these endeavours would lead to the position developing into a full country manager role over the next few years.

 

The ideal candidate will have a strong scientific background as well as excellent administrative, organizational, communication and interpersonal skills. They will also have a good understanding of current priorities in biodiversity conservation in the region, and experience working in the field, managing staff and budgets, and working collaboratively with different cultures, particularly in the Indian subcontinent.

 

Salary will be £21,090 pa. ZSL will also provide one international return flight to the UK (or other home country) per year, full medical emergency evacuation cover, visa fees and 30 days holiday per annum. The successful candidate will be based full time in Nepal, with time spent in Kathmandu and at the project sites as required. There will be occasional visits to ZSL’s UK office.

 

To apply for this position please send your CV and covering letter to the Human Resources Department at hr@zsl.org. The closing date for applications is 25th January, 2013. Interviews are expected to take place in the first week of February. The expected start date is at the end of February, 2013 or as close to that as possible.

http://www.environmentjobs.com/green-jobs/projects-coordinator-nepal.41489.htm

 

3.)  Development and Fundraising Volunteer Organization, Save The Bay, Oakland, California

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=377300028

 

4.)  Communications Assistant, Principles for Responsible Investment, London, England

 

MUST be National Residents / Valid Work Permit-holders.  Other applicants need not apply.

 

About the Principles for Responsible Investment

 

The Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) is an investor initiative in partnership with UNEP Finance Initiative and the UN Global Compact. Launched by UN Secretary- General Kofi Annan and subsequently endorsed by his successor Ban Ki-Moon, the PRI is a set of voluntary best practice principles to assist investors in integrating environmental, social and corporate governance issues into investment processes and ownership practices. The principles are supported by a Secretariat that promotes the PRI and provides implementation support to signatories. See www.unpri.org for further information.

 

Summary of the position

 

The Communications Assistant will support the PRI Communications team to deliver a number of new projects that have been prioritised for early 2013 relating to its new website, social media strategy, signatory webinars and general communications activity. The individual will gain exposure to a broad range of teams and activities within the PRI, including signatory relations and recruitment, implementation support, collaborative shareholder engagement, and reporting and assessment. This position will report to the Head of Communications.

 

Specific responsibilities include:

 

•Further developing and implementing the PRIs social media strategy, identifying and drawing  on best practice within its signatory base and peer organisations.

•Creating collateral to help new and existing signatories better communicate their involvement  with the PRI within their own organisations and with external audiences.

•Drafting articles for publication and providing general team support, including on signatory webinars, reporting and data entry.Requirements and likely experience

 

•Previous experience in a communications function, ideally within an investment institution.

•Strong research and writing skills, with excellent spelling and grammar.

•Interest in responsible investment and ESG issues will be highly regarded.

•Must be eligible to work in the UK.

 

http://www.environmentjobs.com/green-jobs/communications-assistant.41484.htm

 

***  From Sue Bumpous:

 

For both Job of the Week and Your Next Step newsletters – When I changed jobs, I seem to have fallen off the mailing list for both (even though I did not change email addresses)  but will add myself back on.

5.)  Executive Director, Outdoor Writers Association of America

 

OWAA Initiates Search For New Executive Director

The Outdoor Writers Association of America, the nation’s oldest and largest association of professional outdoors-focused communicators, is seeking a new executive director.

The 1,000-member association, formed in 1927 at a meeting of the Izaak Walton League of America, counts among its members the nation’s foremost outdoor writers, photographers, artists and broadcasters.

Current OWAA Executive Director Robin Giner submitted her resignation in November. Giner, who began her affiliation with OWAA in 2001, assumed the role of executive director in 2010. She plans to embark on a career more closely aligned with her agricultural roots.

“During her tenure with the organization Giner helped navigate OWAA through difficult times as it confronted challenges facing the entire media industry,” said OWAA President Mark Taylor, outdoors editor of The Roanoke (Va.) Times.

“However, this presents us with an opportunity to find a new director with the special vision and skills needed to keep moving us forward.”

An eight-member committee of OWAA officers and individual members is heading up the recruiting effort.

In the past, the organization’s leaders felt strongly that the position should be based in Missoula, Mont., current location of OWAA headquarters. That requirement has been adjusted to accommodate skilled individuals who might not find it possible to relocate.

“Our priority is finding a skilled, experienced leader who is familiar with the outdoors industry and outdoors-related communication,” Taylor said. “We are trying to do everything we can to ensure that our pool of candidates is as good as it possibly can be.”

The application deadline for the position is Jan. 21, 2013.

View the complete position description.

 

6.)  Executive Director, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers (BHA), Joseph, OR (position location is flexible)


Backcountry Hunters & Anglers Seeks Executive Director

Position: Executive Director Status: Full time

Description:

Founded around an Oregon campfire in 2004, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers (BHA) seeks to ensure America’s outdoor heritage of hunting and fishing through education and work on behalf of wild public lands and waters. Our strength and inspiration are rooted in the passion and knowledge of our grassroots membership representing the interests of sportsmen and women in nearly all fifty states. In the ever expanding and technological world in which we live, there is a need and a longing to return to the natural world and experience the wonders provided by wild public lands. With our natural resources facing unprecedented challenges and threats, it is our responsibility to advocate for meaningful conservation policies that protect the health and integrity of wild backcountry landscapes for future generations.

BHA is looking for a dynamic Executive Director (ED) with the passion, experience, and energy necessary to lead the organization forward and strengthen its commitment to protecting fish and wildlife habitat and increasing opportunity and access to quality hunting and fishing. Working closely with the Board of directors, state chapter leaders and staff, the ED will be responsible for all aspects of organizational management while establishing concrete goals and objectives to guide BHA’s strategic conservation vision.

Leadership qualifications:

-Avid hunter/angler/conservationist with a deep understanding of America’s western heritage and a passion for its backcountry hunting and fishing culture.

-Ability to represent the organization publicly with the media, elected officials and other policymakers to raise the profile of BHA nationally while maintaining its reputation and influence.

-Excellent communication skills capable of delivering compelling and articulate written and verbal messages.

-Experienced in managing organizations (especially nonprofits) and supervising, inspiring, and motivating paid staff and volunteers.

-Financial oversight experience, including banking, insurance, and taxation for nonprofits.

-Enthusiasm for fundraising and demonstrated ability to cultivate development relationships.

-Demonstrated experience in conflict resolution and convening divergent interests to advance BHA’s mission and promote meaningful conservation policies.

-Ability to work in a self-directed and disciplined manner.

-Understanding of land use management policies involving public land, wildlife, and water and the ability to engage BHA members, grassroots leaders, and advocates to advance conservation priorities and opportunities for hunting and fishing.

-Undergraduate degree required; advanced degrees a plus.

Responsibilities:

-Work closely with the Board of Directors to set the organization’s strategic direction and facilitate effective engagement opportunities for BHA’s members and volunteers.

-Initiate regular conference calls and in-person meetings with the Board of Directors, relevant committees of the Board, and with the leadership of state chapters.

-Organize volunteers and oversee contractors to help achieve specific policy objectives, educate members and public audiences about public land conservation, particularly protecting backcountry public lands and other core habitat, and free-flowing rivers, while supporting campaigns spear-headed by state chapters.

-Direct development and fundraising efforts to increase resources, enhance membership programs, diversify funding sources, and cultivate relationships with foundations, major donors, and supporters to keep BHA financially solvent and growing. This includes writing grants and progress reports, working with staff to hold fundraisers and special events like our annual Rendezvous.

-Working with the staff, Board, Board Chair, and Treasurer, secure a reliable cash flow and provide wise stewardship of economic assets. Communicate with major donors, prospects, accountants, and the Board about appropriate aspects of BHA’s finances.

-Administer grants, conservation campaigns, and related accountability systems to ensure that deliverables are met and staff/contractors are efficiently managed.

-Develop business operation systems to manage budgets, human resources, membership programs, strengthen state chapters, and complement board development.

-Provide guidance to BHA’s state chapters, strengthen capacity, help build new chapters, and serve as conduit between the Board, staff, and chapters.

-Communicate regularly with members to keep our “boots on the ground” volunteers enthused, inspired, and informed about BHA activities.

-Serve as the primary point of contact with media interests, increase BHA’s influence with decision makers and core audiences, and elevate public awareness of BHA with strategic constituents.

-Contribute content to the Backcountry Journal, help publish email alerts and other on-line outreach messages, and maintain consistency across all communications platforms.

The position location is flexible. Proximity to a large regional airport is important. The majority of BHA’s priorities are on public lands throughout the West and Alaska. Travel (including driving) is expected. Willingness to work non-traditional hours and weekends is required.

Compensation will reflect the professional nature of this complex and challenging position and the experience level of the candidate.

To apply, submit resume, cover letter, and writing sample by January 31, 2013 to rcaslar@backcountryhunters.org.

 

7.)  Manager, Major Donor Communications, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=363900011

 

8.)  Development Coordinator, Defenders of Wildlife, Washington, DC

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=25271

 

9.)  Federal Lands Policy Analyst, Defenders of Wildlife, Washington, DC

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=25272

 

10.)  Vice President and Executive Director, Audubon Vermont National Audubon Society Huntington, Vermont

 

For more than a century, Audubon has championed the protection of birds and their habitat. Audubon’s mission is to conserve and restore natural ecosystems, focusing on birds, other wildlife, and their habitats, for the benefit of humanity and the Earth’s biological diversity. With nearly 700 staff, 23 state programs, 465 local chapters, 43 centers and sanctuaries, and close to half a million members throughout the United States, Audubon achieves its mission by engaging people in bird conservation on a hemispheric scale through science, policy, education, and on-the-ground conservation action.

In the fall of 2011, Audubon adopted a new strategic plan to renew the organization’s focus on the biggest and most important opportunities for addressing critical threats to birds and their habitat. At the core of this plan is a focus on flyways: Each year, more than 10 billion birds use major flyways to travel up and down the continent and to points beyond. Underneath these flyways are migratory rest stops and the homes for non-migratory birds that are critical to birds’ survival. These places form a web that represents the richest veins of biodiversity across the Americas. They are the tipping point places that connect people to birds and ecosystems—and where birds thrive, people prosper. By mobilizing and aligning Audubon’s unparalleled network of chapters, centers, state programs, and Important Bird Area (IBA) programs to focus on the four major migratory flyways in the Americas (Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific), the organization will bring the full power of Audubon to bear on protecting common and threatened bird species and the critical habitat they need to survive. Within each flyway, Audubon will sharpen its focus on the most critical species and places, working only where there is a theory of victory for delivering measurable conservation impact at scale. As part of BirdLife International, Audubon will join people in more than 100 countries working to protect a network of IBAs around the world, leveraging the impact of actions they take at a local level. Critical to Audubon’s conservation success will be engaging a growing and more diverse audience to take conservation action.

Position Summary:

Audubon seeks an Executive Director to build on Audubon Vermont’s rich history and expand its contributions to conservation in Vermont and the Atlantic Flyway, leading the organization to its next level of programmatic and financial success. This is a high-profile, pivotal opportunity for a dynamic conservation professional. As one of Audubon’s state programs with a significant leadership role in the Atlantic Flyway, an annual budget of $800,000 and a staff of 12, Audubon Vermont uses its statewide Forest Bird and Champlain Valley Bird conservation initiatives, educational programming, the Green Mountain Audubon Center, its four sanctuaries, seven affiliated local Audubon Chapters, and 3,000 grassroots members to protect birds and their habitats. The successful candidate will have the passion and leadership skills necessary to articulate, develop, and implement Audubon’s conservation goals and strategies in the state, while maintaining its leadership role in the flyway by working closely with the Audubon Vermont Board and staff, and the Vice President of the Atlantic Flyway to align the state program with strategic regional and national priorities. The Executive Director will hold the title of Vice President within the national organization and will report to the VP Atlantic Flyway; s/he will be jointly reviewed by the VP Atlantic Flyway and Audubon Vermont Board each year.

Audubon offers an excellent benefits package and a competitive salary that is commensurate with experience. This position will be located in Huntington, Vermont at the Green Mountain Audubon Center.

Essential Functions:

The Vice President/Executive Director, Audubon Vermont, will perform the following and other duties as assigned:

Strategy Development and Organizational Leadership

• Complete the development and lead the implementation of a five-year strategic plan for Audubon Vermont to grow the organization’s capacity across the state to achieve conservation of priority birds and their habitats.

• Provide leadership, management, and mentoring to a staff of 12 including a team of dedicated program directors in the areas of science, policy, and education to reach the goals set out by the National Strategic Plan as they relate to Vermont and the Green Mountain Audubon Center.

• Have a clear vision, passion, and commitment to leveraging the Green Mountain Audubon Center as a hub for education, science, and demonstration that is clearly and strategically integrated with state and flyway initiatives.

• Manage the day to day operations of the state, including setting financial and programmatic goals, analyzing results, and taking corrective actions, in close collaboration with Audubon Vermont’s program directors.

Fundraising and External Relations

• Lead Audubon Vermont’s fundraising, working closely with Audubon Vermont’s development staff and program directors, the VP of the Atlantic Flyway, and the Chief Development Officer of the National Audubon Society to cultivate and solicit major donors and foundations for Audubon Vermont and Atlantic Flyway initiatives of which Audubon Vermont is a part to significantly increase contributions from diverse stakeholders.

• Represent and raise the profile and visibility of Audubon Vermont externally to funders, partners, policymakers, and the public.

• Work closely with the Audubon Vermont Board to support their efforts in continuing the development of a strong statewide organization through fundraising, program development, and conservation advocacy.

• Inspire and provide guidance to Audubon Vermont chapters to help them realize their potential for on-the-ground conservation and education, as well as within the larger organization’s Atlantic Flyway infrastructure. Work with the Chapter Assembly to strengthen the statewide presence of Audubon and support these organizations in their local efforts.

• Engage Vermont’s growing diverse population through strategic outreach efforts.

• Expand the geographic reach of Audubon Vermont programs both within the state and across the Atlantic Flyway.

Qualifications and Experience:

The successful candidate will have the following qualifications:

• Strong leadership skills, including an engaging and energetic demeanor and the ability to inspire and motivate staff, volunteers, donors, and potential partners

• 7-10 years of experience (preferably in the non-profit sector), including 5 years at a senior management level with comparable staff and budget responsibilities

• Proven success in fundraising, in particular extensive experience with major donors, foundations, corporations, and government funders

• Experience managing institutional growth and change within a decentralized organization highly desirable

• Strategic thinker with the ability to transfer vision and strategy into aligned and effective programs and activities

• Demonstrated ability to partner with key stakeholders, such as Boards of Directors and management teams, all while acting as an ambassador for Audubon Vermont

• Outstanding interpersonal skills, judgment, and an ability to collaborate and build coalitions with a wide range of individuals and organizations at the local, regional, and national levels

• Persuasive communication skills and the ability to effectively represent Audubon Vermont to its members, state and federal elected officials, donors, and chapters leaders, as well as in traditional and social media

• Knowledge and appreciation of Vermont and its environment, its conservation and political history, and the role of science in developing conservation strategies, strongly preferred, as well as an understanding of the role that science, policy, and education cooperatively play in achieving conservation goals and outcomes

• Willingness and ability to travel routinely throughout the state and nationally, as required

• Knowledge of basic accounting protocols and ability to review finances with others to build consensus around priorities and monitor ongoing expenditures

• Bachelor’s degree required, advanced degree in a relevant field preferred

To Apply:

Candidates should apply directly online at: https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1572/vice-president-and-state-executive-director%2c-audubon-vermont/job

 

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=25216

 

11.)  Outdoors Show Internship (Non-Paid, for Academic Credit), KSL Television, Bonneville Communications, Salt Lake City, UT

http://www.ksl.com/web/joblisting.php?file=1312161011.cur

 

12.)  Center Director, Richardson Bay Audubon Center and Sanctuary, Audubon, Tiburon, California

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=405000018

 

13.)  Outreach Coordinator, National Audubon Society, Inc., Oyster Bay, NY

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1588/outreach-coordinator/job

 

14.)  Half-Time Executive Director, Bike&Walk Montclair, Montclair, New Jersey

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=402900009

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2013 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

 

 

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for December 2012

 Your Very Next Step newsletter for December 2012
By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com
“How did it get so late so soon?

Its night before its afternoon.

December is here before its June.

My goodness how the time has flewn.

How did it get so late so soon?”

– Dr. Seuss

“Sunshine is delicious, rain is refreshing, wind braces us up, snow is exhilarating; there is really no such thing as bad weather, only different kinds of good weather.”

– John Ruskin

 

“Advice is like snow – the softer it falls, the longer it dwells upon, and the deeper in sinks into the mind.”

– Samuel Taylor Coleridge

 

“I used to be Snow White, but I drifted.”

– Mae West

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

Subscribe for free. Send a blank email to:
yourverynextstep-subscribe@topica.com.

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 650 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our website (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel:

 

*** In this issue:

***  Rowing: The other paddle sport

***  Natural Poison Ivy Remedies For the Outdoors-person

***  Cold-Weather Riding: Tips to Stay Warm on the Bike

***  An Iceland Grand Tour

***  Best airlines for extra legroom in coach

***  From the  American Hiking Society:  Hiking Etiquette

***  In Virginia, when it comes to snakeheads: Catch and destroy

***  Best iPhone Applications for Winter Outdoor Activities

***  Rental car companies combining

***  Putting science back in science fair projects:

***  10 Best Airlines You’ve Never Flown

***  Condé Nast Traveler Readers’ Choice Awards 2012

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Backcountry Volunteer, Big Cypress National Preserve, Ochopee, Florida

2.)  Volunteer service opportunity, Wilderness Volunteers, Pinnacles National Monument, Paicines, CA

3.)  Communications/Public Relations/Marketing Volunteer, Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: December 2012
New Zealand’s Otago Central Rail Trail
*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Web Developer – C# / ASP.NET / SQL, Altrec.com & GreatOutdoors.com, Redmond, Oregon

2.)  Conservation Fellow, Village Enterprise, Hoima, Uganda

3.)  Editorial and Digital Internship, BACKPACKER magazine, Chantilly, VA

4.)  Cruise Representative, Royal Caribbean Cruises, Ltd., Wichita, Kansas

5.)  Senior Director, Digital Strategy, Wilderness Society, Washington, D.C.

6.)  Outdoor Recreation Advisor, Wisconsin Union, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

7.)  Senior Manager, Corporate Sponsorships, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York

8.)  Marketing Assistant, Uniworld Boutique River Cruises, Encino, California

9.)  Communications Officer, NEW FOREST NATIONAL PARK AUTHORITY, Lymington, Hampshire, UK

10.)  Marketing Manager, Cheyenne Mountain Resort, Colorado Springs, CO

11.)  Public Information Specialist III, ND game and Fish Department, Bismarck, ND

13.)  Director of Communications, American Bird Conservancy, Washington, DC

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Rowing: The other paddle sport

 

By Joel Rogers

 

http://www.greatoutdoors.com/published/rowing-the-other-paddle-sport

 

***  Natural Poison Ivy Remedies For the Outdoors-person

 

by Robbi Drake

http://www.outdoor.com/outdoor-safety/natural-poison-ivy-remedies-for-the-outdoors-person/

 

***  Cold-Weather Riding: Tips to Stay Warm on the Bike

 

By Frank Eastland and Todd Kaib (For Active.com)

http://www.active.com/cycling/Articles/Cold-weather_riding__Tips_to_stay_warm_on_the_bike

 

***  An Iceland Grand Tour

 

Photographer Adam Jaquette show us the wild side to Iceland

 

By Adam Jaquette

http://www.greatoutdoors.com/photogallery/an-iceland-grand-tour

 

***  Best airlines for extra legroom in coach

By Ed Perkins

Smarter Travel

http://travel.yahoo.com/ideas/best-airlines-for-extra-legroom-in-coach.html

 

***  From the  American Hiking Society:

 

Hiking Etiquette

 

Be respectful of the land and other hikers.

Almost every group of people have some unwritten rules to help govern their activity and make things more pleasant for all those participating. Rules such as not cutting in line at a ski lift and keeping your elbows off the table when eating at Mom’s house are just two examples.

Hikers are no different. Following a few unwritten rules can help make your hike and the hike for others more pleasant. Among some commonly observed practices are:

• Hike quietly. Speak in low voices and turn your cell phone down, if not off. Enjoy the sounds of nature and let others do the same.

• If taking a break, move off the trail a ways to allow others to pass by unobstructed.

• Don’t toss your trash – not even biodegradable items such as banana peels. It is not good for animals to eat non-native foods and who wants to look at your old banana peel while it ever-so-slowly decomposes? If you packed it in, pack it back out.

• Hikers going downhill yield to those hiking uphill.

• When bringing a pet on a hike, be sure to keep it on a leash and under control. Don’t forget to pack out pet waste as well.

• Don’t feed the wildlife. While many animals stay hidden, others are not so shy. Giving these creatures food only disrupts their natural foraging habits.

• Leave what you find. The only souvenirs a hiker should come home with are photographs and happy memories. (And maybe an improved fitness level!)

• When relieving yourself outdoors, be sure to do so 200 feet away from the trail and any water sources. Follow Leave No Trace principles.

• Walk through the mud or puddle and not around it, unless you can do so without going off the trail. Widening a trail by going around puddles, etc. is bad for trail sustainability. Just because it looks easy to cut the corner off of a switchback doesn’t mean it is a good idea. Help preserve the trail by staying on the trail.

• If hiking in a group, don’t take up the whole width of the trail; allow others to pass.

 

http://www.americanhiking.org/HikingResources/Etiquette/

 

***  In Virginia, when it comes to snakeheads: Catch and destroy:

 

All anglers are reminded to acquaint themselves with a good description of the northern snakehead fish. If you should manage to catch one of these exotic imports, please kill it immediately and report the catch to either the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries or the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_1HmUY5EOo

 

***  Best iPhone Applications for Winter Outdoor Activities

 

By Christina Scannapiego (for Active.com)

http://www.active.com/outdoors/articles/Best-iPhone-Applications-for-Winter.htm

 

***  Rental car companies combining

 

Wary Of Consolidation, Buyers Could Benefit From Hertz-Dollar Thrifty Deal

 

http://www.businesstravelnews.com/More-News/Wary-Of-Consolidation,-Buyers-Could-Benefit-From-Hertz-Dollar-Thrifty-Deal/?ida=Car%20Rental&a=proc&cid=eltrDaily

 

***  Putting science back in science fair projects:

 

http://www.yourwildlife.org/2012/11/putting-the-science-back-into-science-fair-projects/

 

***  10 Best Airlines You’ve Never Flown

By Ed Perkins

Smarter Travel

http://www.smartertravel.com/photo-galleries/editorial/10-best-airlines-youve-never-flown.html?id=142

 

***  Condé Nast Traveler Readers’ Choice Awards 2012

 

Cities, Islands, Hotels, Resorts, Cruises, Airlines

 

Who but Condé Nast Traveler readers would have heard of, let alone traveled to, Bozcaada or Knysna? They’re winners this year, and that is only part of what makes these Readers’ Choice Awards so exceptional. Not just the numbers—although a record 46,476 readers participated. Not just the effect—always raising the bar, with 370 hotels, resorts, and cruise lines, incredibly, rating above 90. But also the vigorous curiosity to go where so few follow. You even, occasionally, locate sheer perfection—this year in Australia, granting a perfect score of 100 to Qualia resort on the Great Barrier Reef. In this, the 25th annual survey, you elected a grand total of 1,306 winners.

 

http://www.cntraveler.com/readers-choice-awards

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Backcountry Volunteer, Big Cypress National Preserve, Ochopee, Florida

 

The freshwaters of the Big Cypress Swamp, essential to the health of the neighboring Everglades, support the rich marine estuaries along Florida’s southwest coast. Protecting over 729,000 acres of this vast swamp, Big Cypress National Preserve contains a mixture of tropical and temperate plant communities that are home to a diversity of wildlife, including the elusive Florida panther.

 

The goal of the Backcountry Volunteer Program is to increase the ability of the NPS to contact, assist and educate visitors in the Preserve backcountry, assist with minor trail maintenance as needed and aid in the monitoring of the backcountry trail system.

 

Backcountry Volunteers are trained in the use of Off-Road Vehicles (ORV) and travel along backcountry trails that allow for ORV use assisting and educating visitors as needed. Volunteers perform minor trail maintenance and identify major trail issues that need to be addressed.

 

Backcountry Volunteers are customer service oriented, enjoy the outdoors, have a basic understanding of backcountry travel and are good team players. Prior knowledge of Big Cypress trails and ORVs is beneficial for these volunteers, but not necessary. To become part of the program, a short training commitment is required.

 

The entrance to Big Cypress is located on Interstate 75 (Alligator Alley) and US Highway 41 (Tamiami Trail). These are the main roads that traverse the site. Visitor facilities and most activities originate from the Tamiami Trail.

 

Each year hundreds of volunteers contribute approximately 30,000 hours of service to Big Cypress National Preserve. Volunteers are involved in virtually every aspect of preserve operations. Some work full-time during the winter season, while others may work one day a week or even for a few hours on a special project. Some are students and others are retirees looking for adventure during their “golden years.” Some maintain and/or patrol trails while others work as campground hosts or as visitor center personnel.

 

Regardless of age or background, these folks share a desire to make a positive contribution to the management of the preserve. Volunteers are a valuable and valued part of our operation and our community.

 

For more information regarding the Big Cypress National Preserve volunteer program, please contact the preserve Volunteer Coordinator at 239-695-1229, or by email (http://www.nps.gov/bicy/supportyourpark/volunteer.htm).

 

Mailing Address:

Attention: Volunteer Coordinator

Big Cypress National Preserve

33000 Tamiami Trail East

Ochopee, FL 34141

 

http://www.nps.gov/bicy/supportyourpark/backcountry-volunteer.htm

 

2.)  Volunteer service opportunity, Wilderness Volunteers, Pinnacles National Monument, Paicines, CA

 

Apr 21st – Apr 27th 2013

 

Strenuous

 

Established in 1908 to preserve the incongruent and beautiful rock formations of its namesake, Pinnacles National Monument encompasses about 26,000 acres east of central California’s Salinas Valley in the southern portion of the Gabilan Mountains, one of a series of parallel northwest-trending ridges and valleys that make up the Central Coast Range. The giant San Andreas Fault split an ancient volcano and the Pacific Plate crept north, carrying the Pinnacles. The work of water and wind on these erodible volcanic rocks has formed the unusual rock structures seen today. Massive monoliths, spires, sheer-walled canyons and talus passages define millions of years of erosion, faulting and tectonic plate movement.

 

The rolling chaparral and dramatic rock faces of Pinnacles National Monument inspire loyalty in visitors from picnickers to rock-climbers, and from stargazers to cave explorers, and of course to volunteers. Pinnacles is visually stunning. This striking beauty is attributable, in part, to the Monument’s geologic formations, showcase chaparral habitat, finely integraded ecosystems, and protected native plant and animal diversity. Pinnacles National Monument is a release site for the endangered California condor, and the birds can sometimes be seen from hiking trails throughout the park.

 

Our service project is assisting Pinnacle’s vegetation team by removing exotic, non-native plants from backcountry canyons and streams. Spring is the ideal time to be in Pinnacles, with wildflowers and wildlife all reawakening. We’ll camp in a designated campsite in tents or our vehicles and walk or make short daily drives to worksites in the backcountry.

 

This project features a vegetarian menu with optional meat ingredients on many meals. We can relax at the end of the work day — our full-time cook will have dinner ready for us, including plenty of fresh ingredients and some meals baked in her Dutch oven.

 

Check out more photos from last year’s Pinnacles project in our gallery.

 

The fee for 2013 projects is $299. If you want to be on the waitlist for a project that is currently full, submit an application and select the Pay By Check option. We will notify you if space becomes available. If you are still interested in doing the trip, payment will be due at that time.

 

Offered by Wilderness Volunteers.  This is just one of many projects offered by WV.

 

http://www.wildernessvolunteers.org/php/project/+Pinnacles+National+Monument/1c8fd251fcb0c3ad91178fd9782c7cc7.html

 

3.)  Communications/Public Relations/Marketing Volunteer, Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

http://www.idealist.org/view/volop/gH7HJHGxbxjd/

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: December 2012
New Zealand’s Otago Central Rail Trail
By Laura Stark

“Not all those who wander are lost.” – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

This month, fans of the popular Lord of the Rings movies are eagerly anticipating the latest installment of the acclaimed series, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. For an experience in Middle Earth, adventurers both tall and small can take their own journey along the Otago Central Rail Trail, a well-kept gravel pathway running 150 kilometers (more than 90 miles) through the region where many of the film’s sequences were shot. The gorgeous backdrop for the movies—wind-swept vistas, rugged mountains, lush green farm fields, and jaw-dropping river gorges—can all be found on this unique rail-trail on New Zealand’s South Island.

“The Hobbit people were here for quite a while,” says Kate Wilson, chair of the Otago Central Rail Trail Charitable Trust, a nonprofit group established in 1994 to raise funds for the trail and promote its use. “They were filming on Rock and Pillar, Taieri Ridge and around Queenstown.”

Queenstown, known as a hub for skiing, whitewater rafting and other extreme sports, is not far from the rail-trail’s western end at the town of Clyde. But even without the side trip, there is plenty to experience on the trail itself, named after the railway line built here in the early 20th century to transport produce from this rich agricultural heartland.

Perhaps one of the best embodiments of this early rural culture can be found at Hayes Engineering Works in Oturehua. It’s the factory of Ernest Hayes—farmer, miller and inventor extraordinaire—who invented and produced many types of farming tools, some still in use today. His wife, Hannah, supported these endeavors by going door to door by bicycle to sell the unique products. Their 1895 homestead, as well as the original workshop, windmill and other structures, can be explored today in this fascinating living museum.

Before the railway, gold fever swept the area in the 1860s. In Oturehua you can visit the Golden Progress Mine, a short detour off the trail. Its tall winding tower straddles a shaft that was used to reach gold-bearing quartz deep in the ground. Many other relics of this gold-mining era can be found along the pathway, but perhaps none as unusual as the Platypus, New Zealand’s first submarine, built in 1874 to dredge the river beds for gold. After an unsuccessful test run in Otago Harbor, the project was abandoned and its rusty hull is now on display at the Strath Taieri Museum in Middlemarch, the trail’s eastern terminus.

After 85 years of rail service, road-based freight eventually replaced the Otago Central Railway and the line closed in 1990. In 1993, the federal Department of Conservation sought to turn the disused rail corridor into a recreational amenity. They found support in a small group of community volunteers who soon formed the Otago Central Rail Trail Charitable Trust to help sustain the project. The first section, about 8 kilometers (5 miles) from Clyde to Alexandra, opened in 1994. The trail continued to grow from both ends until it was finally completed in 2000.

“There was quite strong opposition in the beginning,” says Daphne Hull, a founding member of the Otago Central Rail Trail Charitable Trust. “As soon as the rail went out, the fences went up. But it’s 100 percent positive now. As a group, we went around to the communities and invited the neighbors to talk about the trail. Personal one-to-one contact is what convinced them. When the railway left, these little communities were dying and we showed them the possibilities that the trail could bring.”

Now, thousands flock to the Otago Central Rail Trail each year, infusing the local economy with more than NZ$12 million a year (about US$9.9 million) from lodging, food and other tourist spending.

“I first moved to Middlemarch in 1992, just as the railway was closing,” says Wilson. “Things were pretty dire. Some hotels and pubs were closing. It was a slow creep, but the trail made sure that hotels stayed open, and started the development of new businesses. Farmers could offer homestays and B&Bs. Middlemarch didn’t have a café then, but now supports three, which is quite something for a population of 250.”

The trail has proved so successful that it caught the attention of New Zealand’s federal government and helped spur a recent nationwide trail initiative to generate economic, social and environmental benefits for communities along trails elsewhere. The New Zealand Cycle Trail, launched in 2009 and supported by an impressive NZ$50 million investment from the government, will be one trail to rule them all: an intertwined network of off-road pathways stretching more than 2,400 kilometers (1,500 miles) across the country.

“The Otago Central Rail Trail is a local economic success story and provided, in part, the inspiration for developing a national network of cycle trails,” Prime Minister John Key stated in a press release earlier this year. “The idea was to build a nationwide network of cycle trails that would emulate the benefits of the Otago Central Rail Trail and promote New Zealand as an international cycling destination.”

But one does not simply walk into Mordor…ahem, Otago. Amenities along the trail are somewhat rustic, so you will need to be prepared. Although public toilets are available at frequent intervals, they do not provide toilet paper. In such a dry climate, water is a precious resource and often untreated, so drinking commercially bottled water is best. A flashlight will come in handy, too, as the trail’s three tunnels are unlit.

When deciding when to visit, keep in mind that New Zealand, being in the southern hemisphere, has seasons reversed from the U.S., and each as its own charms.

“The seasonal change from summer to autumn has the whole region in a vivid display of autumn color,” says Michelle Ormsby, tourism manager for Tourism Central Otago. “Particularly the orchards, vineyards and deciduous trees that line the rail trail. Spring brings the vibrancy of new growth, with a backdrop of snow-capped mountains. Summer is hot, dry and shimmery, with the days long and generally settled.”

But one thing does not change no matter when you go. Small, friendly communities line the rail-trail every 10 miles or so, welcoming you at every step. “You’ll be going through locations with some of the nicest people in the world,” says Wilson.

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Web Developer – C# / ASP.NET / SQL, Altrec.com & GreatOutdoors.com, Redmond, Oregon

 

If you only like to bug-fix and maintain, this position is NOT for you.

 

HOWEVER, if you:

 

Want to build something great from the ground up…

 

Get excited about the thought of designing and architecting a company-wide, impactful solution…

 

Want to work for a growing company in an awesome industry, putting your C# development skills to the test…

 

THEN, please read on…

 

Altrec.com, a leading online retailer of outdoor gear and apparel, is seeking a seasoned Web Developer (C#, ASP.NET, SQL) to join our talented Technology team in Redmond, Oregon. This is a great opportunity for a Web Developer who wants to build something exciting from scratch. This position will focus on brand new e-commerce web development using the latest technologies.

 

More specifically, this position will be responsible for analyzing, designing, building, and testing brand new e-commerce focused web applications. You will work in a team environment on a host of projects, ranging from small to highly complex, that have a major impact on our website functionality, our systems, and, ultimately, our customers’ experiences. You will participate in architecture sessions, design sessions, and code development and testing for these projects to support our e-commerce business.

 

We have a small, high-performing technology team, so you should expect to be challenged to help make our website the absolute best it can be.

 

In addition to working with the technology team, you should also expect to be a true partner with various company departments, including Marketing, Merchandising and Production.

 

REQUIRED SKILLS & QUALIFICATIONS:

•You must have at least 4 years of experience in the following areas:◦Outstanding skills writing web applications with C#

◦Developing web-based applications in a Windows environment using .NET

◦Excellent experience with HTML, JavaScript, CSS and jQuery

 

•At least 3 years experience developing stored procedures using Microsoft SQL Server

•Strong web security knowledge and experience

•Experience with Web Services and XML

•Demonstrated skills in systems analysis, design, coding and testing web applications

•Object-oriented analysis (OOA) and design (OOD) experience

•The ability to understand and execute in all phases of a project(s)

•A true business-oriented mindset, with the ability to solve problems through technology

•Keen sense of innovation and creativity

•Strong ability to communicate effectively at all levels in an organization

•The ability to work well in a team environment

•Bachelors’ degree in Computer Science and/or Business related field, or equivalent.

 

DESIRED SKILLS & QUALIFICATIONS:

•Experience in the e-commerce retail sector is highly preferred

•Mobile development experience is a bonus

•Social media platform development knowledge (Twitter / Facebook) is desired

•Agile development experience

•Experience with Flash

 

OUR CULTURE:

Every day is “Bring-Your-Dog-to-Work Day.” Our job is to help our customers get outside to enjoy the Great Outdoors and ensure they have the perfect gear to do it right. We embody what we do. You will see our employees wearing much of the gear we sell because we are out “in it,” in the vast playground that is Central Oregon. Our culture is informal – jeans, t-shirts and hats – and we’re also intelligent, creative business people seeking to move the needle every day. This is just some of what you will see as you walk around in our offices – just be sure to step over the occasional lazy dog!

 

BENEFITS:

 

Altrec.com is committed to providing a fulfilling work environment that allows employees to balance their personal lives with their professional careers.  This position provides generous vacation time, a full benefits package (medical, dental, and vision), and attractive company perks & discounts.  Pay is commensurate with experience.

 

TO APPLY:

 

Please email your cover letter and resume to jobs@altrec.com  with “Web Developer” in the Subject line.

 

http://www.greatoutdoors.com/published/web-developer-c-aspnet-sql

 

2.)  Conservation Fellow, Village Enterprise, Hoima, Uganda

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=399200009

 

3.)  Editorial and Digital Internship, BACKPACKER magazine, Chantilly, VA

 

Score a BACKPACKER magazine internship and learn to create inspirational stories about the outdoors. BACKPACKER is looking for self-starting, detail-obsessed journalism students with writing, editing, and new media skills for semester-long internships.

 

Students will have the opportunity to write and edit for print and the web as well opportunities to shoot in-the-field-video, obtain essential GPS and content management system knowledge, and more.

 

• work side-by-side with an award-winning print

and web staff

• shoot, star in, and edit in-the-field videos

• write bylined stories, blogs, and trip reports

• manage writers and freelancers

• plan future issues

• learn the art of great story pitching

• network with magazine editors

• test new tents, boots, packs, and sleeping bags

• obtain essential web content management and

SEO skills.

• learn PhotoShop and InDesign Basics.

*5 minutes from CU campus, on the bus line and right off the bike path

*For-credit internships offered at 20 hours per week

 

Send a cover letter and resume to BACKPACKER Associate Editor Rachel Zurer at rzurer@backpacker.com.

 

For school credit only.

http://www.backpacker.com/employment/

 

4.)  Cruise Representative, Royal Caribbean Cruises, Ltd., Wichita, Kansas

http://jobview.monster.com/Rep-Cruise-Job-Wichita-KS-115373272.aspx

 

5.)  Senior Director, Digital Strategy, Wilderness Society, Washington, D.C.

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=308000012

 

6.)  Outdoor Recreation Advisor, Wisconsin Union, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

 

Required experience and skills (for a complete job description see Position Vacancy Listing 75038, website listed below)

•Bachelor’s degree required, masters preferred in education or behavioral science with course work in student personnel, counseling, recreation or group dynamics.

•One to three years experience advising and educating college-age students and student groups in areas such as meeting facilitation, program planning, marketing, delegation, risk-management, budgeting, etc.

•One to three years professional experience in student development within a college union/student activities or recreational sports setting preferred.

•Strong written and verbal skills. Ability to produce professional reports and present ideas to a variety of audiences.

•Demonstrated critical thinking and decision making skills

•Demonstrated commitment to creating a work environment that is welcoming and respectful of everyone regardless of identity, background, interest or ability.

•Ability to facilitate exchange of ideas and assist students in translating them into plans and programs.

•Experience in any of the following outdoor activities: skiing, snowboarding, hiking, canoeing, kayaking, climbing, sailing, SCUBA diving, or windsurfing. Horseback riding/horse care experience a plus.

•Willingness to adjust personal schedule to the needs of programming, understanding the need to observe, participate in and evaluate programs. Frequent evening and some weekend hours required.

•Experience utilizing outdoor recreation as a way to teach leadership and social education skills preferred.

 

Duties and application procedure are contained in Position vacancy Listing 75038 located on the University of Wisconsin employment opportunities web site;

 

http://www.ohr.wisc.edu/WebListing/Unclassified/PVLSummary.aspx?pvl_num=75038

 

About Outdoor Recreation at the Wisconsin Union

 

The Union’s outdoor recreation space and facilities is currently under renovation and will reopen in June 2013.  This position will work with the Outdoor Recreation Director, Union staff, and students to use the construction phase as a catalyst for reflection, evaluation, and change in program offerings and services. Outdoor rentals, which will be closed until the renovation project is completed, has historically provided students, Union members, faculty, staff, and University guests with rental opportunities of outdoor equipment from canoes to camping gear.  During the renovation project, an analysis of the outdoor rentals operation will be performed and recommendations will be made as a result of the analysis.

 

Hoofers is the largest branch of the Union’s Outdoor Recreation Unit and consists of six separate clubs: Sailing, Ski & Snowboard, Outing, Riding, Mountaineering, and SCUBA, as well as five collegiate teams.  The clubs are coordinated by Hoofer Council which is composed of a representative from each of the six clubs plus five elected executives and six appointed officers.  Each club administers its own program with funds generated completely from membership dues, activity fees, and fundraising.  The current total Hoofer budget is at $1.4 million.

 

Since its inception in 1931 as a collegiate outdoor recreation program, Hoofers continues to be one of the largest and most active outdoor programs in the country. For example, the Sailing club with 1300 members has the largest inland sailing fleet and the second largest fleet in the country. The Riding Club operates a 40 acre boarding and teaching facility 30 minutes south of Madison and the Ski & Snowboard clubs hosts the Midwest’s largest ski resale every year and has been offering trips for over 45 years. The Outing Club has the Midwest’s largest paddling club and SCUBA offers PADI certified diving programs. Between 400 and 500 youth participate every summer youth riding and sailing programs. Finally, the clubs host a variety of annual events reaching thousands of members of the campus community.

 

http://jobview.monster.com/Outdoor-Recreation-Advisor-Job-Madison-WI-116282508.aspx

 

7.)  Senior Manager, Corporate Sponsorships, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=335300003

 

8.)  Marketing Assistant, Uniworld Boutique River Cruises, Encino, California

http://www.talentzoo.com/job/Marketing-Assistant/139823.html

 

9.)  Communications Officer, NEW FOREST NATIONAL PARK AUTHORITY, Lymington, Hampshire, UK

 

The New Forest National Park Authority is responsible for conserving and enhancing the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the New Forest and for promoting opportunities for the understanding and enjoyment of its special qualities by the public.

 

Communications Officer

 

£28,901 – £32,087 per annum

 

37 hours per week

 

Fixed-term to February 2015

 

An exciting opportunity has arisen to join our award-winning communications team. The Communications Officer will play a vital role in promoting the work of the National Park and as such should be a fluent, natural writer, skilled at tailoring information for a range of audiences.

 

Thriving in a fast-paced environment, you will be talented at identifying great stories and bringing these to life for a wide range of media, our website and our audiences.

 

This varied role would suit an enthusiastic media professional with superb interpersonal and account management skills coupled with press office and online experience. You will be able to juggle tasks and work under pressure to deliver a first class service within the National Park Authority, assisting colleagues across the organisation and working with partner organisations, to devise and manage multimedia activity for a range of projects and campaigns.

 

This post is based at the Authority’s offices in Lymington, Hampshire.

 

For an informal discussion please contact HR on hr@newforestnpa.gov.uk or 01590 646637.

 

For a full job description and to apply please click the button below to visit our website.

 

CVs are not accepted.

 

Closing date: 14th December 2012.

 

Interviews: w/c 14th January 2013.

 

http://jobs.guardian.co.uk/job/4549774/communications-officer/

 

10.)  Marketing Manager, Cheyenne Mountain Resort, Colorado Springs, CO

http://andrewhudsonsjobslist.com/index.cfm?PID=805&ID=8664,29681,0#j1

 

11.)  Public Information Specialist III, ND game and Fish Department, Bismarck, ND

http://www.nd.gov/hrms/jobs/7206630.html

 

13.)  Director of Communications, American Bird Conservancy, Washington, DC

 

The Director of Communications oversees all aspects of the Communications Division, including media relations, publications, web, social media, and other forms of electronic communications, and internal communications. The Director of Communications is responsible for managing all staff members in this Division, setting priorities and direction for ABC communications, and achieving long-term communications goals.

 

This position requires significant abilities and experience in communications and management, preferably within the NGO community, a broad understanding of ABC’s mission and philosophies, and a clear vision for ABC’s future place in the public consciousness and compelling ideas on how to achieve it. Knowledge of current bird conservation issues in the Americas is strongly preferred.

 

Major Duties

 

• Coordinate and increase ABC outreach to U.S and international media outlets. This includes developing strategies and overseeing implementation of media and outreach campaigns in order to achieve the greatest media. • Manage and supervise staff in the Communications Division. Ensure all Communications Staff have appropriate and adequate training. • Create new and further develop existing strategies for expanding ABC communications to its members, other constituents, and the general public to maximize the organization’s public profile and recognition of its conservation achievements. • Oversee the timely production of ABC’s major publications (magazine, newsletter and annual report), including scheduling, content development, design, and distribution. • Oversee the management and development of ABC websites, including content, design, and navigation. • Coordinate integrated communications to ABC constituents in tandem with ongoing conservation campaigns and fundraising activities. • Oversee and further develop ABC’s social media campaigns. • Explore and enhance opportunities for collaborative communications outreach with other organizations. • Work with all divisions of ABC to enhance communications on ABC’s conservation work. • Oversee and enhance internal communication mechanisms within ABC. • Assist the Director of Membership in developing innovative ways of expanding ABC’s membership base. • Act as ABC spokesperson on ABC programs to the public, press, and peers in the conservation community. • Other duties as assigned.

 

Position Requirements

 

• An undergraduate degree in the biological sciences, English, or journalism, plus a Masters degree in communications/media relations or at least four years relevant communications experience or a combination of relevant education and experience. • Proven experience in managing a communications program for an NGO or equivalent, including planning, scheduling, budgeting, and evaluating program needs. • Proven experience and ability in communicating with the press. • Proven experience and ability in coordinating media campaigns. • Proven writing and editing experience, including feature articles. • An understanding of social media and electronic communications systems and how they can be used most effectively to reach a broad, targeted audience. • Must be an effective communicator, both written and oral, able to synthesize copious, complex, and diverse material into information that ABC constituents will find understandable, engaging, and compelling. • Ability to identify and act on useful outreach opportunities. • Experience managing publications to regular deadlines. • Energetic, entrepreneurial, creative, proven managerial experience, and well organized, with the ability to coordinate many tasks and responsibilities.

 

http://www.idealist.org/view/job/7cgxgkWjf2fP/

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
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Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
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