Your Very Next Step newsletter for December 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for December 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com
“The creation of a thousand forests is in one acorn.”

– Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu
This edition of “Your very next step” comes to you from San Diego, California

 

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.
***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:
***  Ned’s upcoming travel

***  Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™

***  DFW’s complimentary Travel Lounges

***  Find a Volunteer Vacation That’s Right For You!

***  The future of airport service is at JFK T4 – and it works!

***  The Best Budget Airlines In The World

***  Top Ten on-time airlines

***  ATTA Takes “Pulse” of U.S. Adventure Travelers for Latest Research

***  Rail Trail of the Month: New Hampshire’s Presidential Range Rail Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteers/Internships, Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge, Calipatria, Ca.

2.)  Habitat Restoration and Assessment Surveys, Sky Island Alliance, Tucson, AZ

3.)  Adopt a Trail or Shelter, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

4.)  Bark Mulch Packers, Backcountry Composting Sites, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

5.)  Interpretive Volunteers, Santa Clara County, Open Space Authority, San Jose, CA

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Lead paddler 2015, Coastal Odyssey/kayak more tomorrow, Ålesund, Norway

2.)  Waitstaff, Turpin Meadow Ranch, Jackson Hole, Wyoming

3.)  University of Minnesota Recreation, Park & Leisure Studies Dept. Outdoor Recreation Immersion Semester.

4.)  Government Relations Internship, The Wilderness Society, Washington, DC

5.)  Communcations Manager, Four Corners, The Wilderness Society, Denver, CO

6.)  Trail Guide, Wilderness Inquiry, Minneapolis, MN

7.)  Adventure Forest, Wilderness at the Smokies, Sevierville, TN

8.)  Senior Director of Marketing and Communications, Sustainable Travel International, New York, Oregon, or Washington, DC

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!
*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel, maybe, perhaps:

 

December 8-10, Aubu Dhabi, UAE

 

December 11, Bahrain

 

December 20-22, San Diego, CA

 

January 27-30    Genoa, Italy

 

March 15-20, Accra, Ghana

 

***  Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™

 

The Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™ (officially recognized by the U.S. EPA) has engaged tens of thousands of young volunteers (kids, teens, and college-age youth) from around the world in environmental cleanup and conservation projects since 1999. This program has received multiple awards from the City of Albuquerque, a “Best Community Impact” award from Eastern Kentucky University, and is featured on thousands of web sites. View recent Apprentice Ecologist Projects and past Apprentice Ecologist Awards to get ideas for your own environmental stewardship project. The goals of the Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™ are to:

 

  • Elevate youth into leadership roles by engaging them in environmental cleanup and conservation projects,
  • Empower young people to rebuild the environmental and social well-being of our communities,
  • Improve local living conditions for both citizens and wildlife through education, activism, and action.

 

Here’s how to become an official Apprentice Ecologist and be considered for a scholarship:

 

  • Conduct your own environmental stewardship project in 2014 .
  • Take a few digital photos of your project in action.
  • Write an essay about your project and what it meant to you.
  • Register and upload your favorite project photo along with your essay.
  • Examples of projects that other Apprentice Ecologists have completed in the past include:

 

  • Removing and recycling trash from a local park, river, beach, or other natural area
  • Planting native trees at a school, local park, or in a deforested area
  • Starting a community or school recycling/composting program
  • Protecting a terrestrial or aquatic area for native wildlife
  • Promoting the conservation of an endangered species or area
  • Educating others about wildlife or conservation issues
  • Removing graffiti from natural areas
  • Taking steps to prevent pollution/contamination locally
  • Removing nonnative vegetation so that native vegetation can flourish
  • Improving awareness about the importance of using renewable energy sources
  • Reducing soil erosion by maintaining established trails and closing off short-cuts
  • Assisting the elderly with their yards by planting/maintaining vegetation that provides native wildlife habitat

 

Building a rain garden that utilizes roof runoff to grow vegetation that provides native wildlife habitat

After uploading your project photo and essay, we will publish your work on our Global Registry of Apprentice Ecologists and provide links to download an official Apprentice Ecologist heat transfer (for T-shirt). Please only upload an image that you took or one that you have permission to post (this avoids copyright problems). If you do not have a project photo, simply upload the NWP logo image along with your essay. An NWP tote bag (made with organic cotton) will be awarded to the authors of the 10 best essays on an annual basis. School and community groups, especially those working with at-risk and disadvantaged youth, are highly encouraged to participate.

 

Three scholarships totaling $850 will be awarded annually to the authors of the three best Apprentice Ecologist essays. The top author will also receive a personalized crystal award courtesy of Crown Awards & Trophies. By registering and submitting your essay, you will automatically be considered for a scholarship. Be sure to include your full contact information (always private) when registering so that we can process any scholarships/awards that you may win. Scholarships are available to any student (ages 13 to 21) who is a candidate for a degree/diploma at a primary (middle school), secondary (high school), or accredited post-secondary (undergraduate at college or university) educational institution from any country around the world. The award covers 1) tuition and fees to enroll in or attend an accredited post-secondary (undergraduate or graduate at college or university) educational institution and/or 2) fees, books, supplies, and equipment required for courses. Applicants should embody the spirit of the Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™ by demonstrating personal leadership, initiative, and environmental stewardship in their project. Essays will be judged by a committee of Nicodemus Wilderness Project board members, volunteers, and past Apprentice Ecologist award winners. Please see tips below for additional elements that the committee considers important when judging essays.

While there is no minimum/maximum length for essays, most of our past winners have written essays that ranged from about 750 to 1,500 words long. The deadline for uploading your Apprentice Ecologist project essay is midnight GMT on December 31, 2014 .

Winners of the annual Apprentice Ecologist Awards will be published online on Earth Day (April 22).

 

Note: There is a separate Apprentice Ecologist Open Space Initiative scholarship if your project benefitted any lands managed or co-managed by the City of Albuquerque’s Open Space Division.

 

Important tips for writing an award-winning essay about your Apprentice Ecologist project:

 

Briefly describe your personal background and why you chose to do an Apprentice Ecologist project on behalf of the Nicodemus Wilderness Project.

 

  • Name and describe the area where you conducted your project.
  • Provide details about what you did and accomplished during your project.
  • If your project was part of a multi-year effort, focus your essay on the work that you conducted in 2014 .
  • Describe why you think it is important to take care of the area where you conducted your project.
  • Explain how your project helps benefit your community and the environment.
  • Describe how your Apprentice Ecologist Project has helped to enrich your life and what it has inspired you to do in the future.
  • Check and correct any spelling and grammatical errors prior to submitting your essay.

 

Important tips for conducting a safe and successful Apprentice Ecologist project:

 

  • Listen to weather reports and plan your project accordingly.
  • Always stay with at least one other person. Teams of three or more are preferable.
  • Make sure that someone knows where, when, and for how long you will be out.
  • Look out for poisonous plants, venomous snakes, and stinging insects.
  • Leave syringes and needles alone! Notify authorities about their location.
  • Bring or wear: boots, gloves, hat, sunscreen, first aid kit, water, food.
  • Notify landowners about your plans prior to conducting your project.

If you need help or have questions, you can contact us any time at: mail@wildernessproject.org.

 

http://www.wildernessproject.org/volunteer_apprentice_ecologist.php

 

***  DFW’s complimentary Travel Lounges

 

While awaiting my connection between San Diego and Washington national at DFW, I had some time to kill.  I have no status on American (despite being one of AA’s original Aadvantage members), but stumbled into a little quiet “Dallas Lounge” that was free and open to the public.  Just a quiet place to sit, plug in a laptop, recharge a phone, and stay out of the melee.

 

Here’s what the website says:

 

Relax and recharge in DFW’s complimentary Travel Lounges, which provide a welcome setting with warm lighting, lounge and workstation seating, and power outlets at every seat.

 

https://www.dfwairport.com/shops/finder.php?type=services

 

***  Find a Volunteer Vacation That’s Right For You!

http://www.americanhiking.org/em-volunteer-vacations/

 

***  The future of airport service is at JFK T4 – and it works!

Dec 8, 2014 by Karen Walker in ATW Editor’s Blog

 

I’m at New York JFK Terminal 4 between flights from DCA and GVA and there is something very interesting happening here that I think marks the future for great airport customer service.

 

At the dedicated Delta part of T4, you are shown to a table in the Due Amici restaurant, from where everything is automated via on-the-table iPads.  A server shows you how to do it if you are a first-timer, but it’s pretty simple. Just pick what you want from the tablet menu, complete with detailed descriptions, see your bill total, swipe your credit card in the on-table slide, select a gratuity percentage, and your order is confirmed and a receipt immediately sent to your email if you wish.

 

But it gets better. You can order food and beverages to eat at the table or in a bag to go. It will be delivered within 15 minutes –my order came much quicker. There are power sockets at each table so you can also charge up your own portable devices while waiting. And the iPad is free to use while you are there to surf the net, check your flight status, take a look at the weather forecast for where you are going or whatever. It has multiple language options and everything is at your fingertips.

 

This part of T4 is equipped with many of these auto-iPad service stations throughout the facility. A waiter told me that the Due Amici iPads were installed about three months ago and he admitted they were still adapting to the concept. He said customer reaction has been mixed: frequent travelers and younger passengers love it; older people who don’t fly often are taken aback and say they want a “real person” taking their order. That’s still an option – you can ask for conventional service or press the icon on the tablet for assistance.

 

As far as I’m concerned, based on my experience today, I can’t wait to see more airports adopt this (and more airlines for in-cabin service). There’s no trying to flag up a waiter for your order or your check, you can continuously monitor your flight, news and anything else, and you are charged up and ready to go when you need to leave.

 

Delta, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and JFK IAT opened the revamped T4 in May 2013. JFK IAT is wholly owned by Schiphol USA, a subsidiary of Amsterdam Airport owner and operator Schiphol Group, and privately operates the terminal under a development/management lease from PANYNJ.

 

From what I’ve seen, they’ve got the future of airport service worked out.

http://atwonline.com/blog/future-airport-service-jfk-t4-and-it-works

 

***  The Best Budget Airlines In The World

By MELISSA STANGER

http://www.businessinsider.com/best-budget-airlines-2014-12

 

***  Top Ten on-time airlines

http://successfulmeetings.com/Strategy/SM-Top-10/The-Top-10-On-Time-Airlines/?cid=eltrTop10

 

***  ATTA Takes “Pulse” of U.S. Adventure Travelers for Latest Research

Written By: CHRISTINA BECKMANN

http://www.adventuretravelnews.com/atta-takes-pulse-of-u-s-adventure-travelers-for-latest-research

 

***  Rail Trail of the Month:

 

New Hampshire’s Presidential Range Rail Trail

 

We’ve found New Hampshire’s best-kept secret—the Presidential Range Rail Trail—and winter is the perfect time to visit it. With a long snowy season, generally running between mid-December and early April, there are plenty of opportunities to enjoy its spectacular views on a pair of Nordic skis or snowshoes.

 

http://www.railstotrails.org/trailblog/2014/december/09/new-hampshire-s-presidential-range-rail-trail/?tag=Trail+of+the+Month

 

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteers/Internships, Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge, Calipatria, Ca.

http://www.fws.gov/saltonsea/volunteer.html

 

2.)  Habitat Restoration and Assessment Surveys, Sky Island Alliance, Tucson, AZ

http://www.skyislandalliance.org/volunteer.htm

 

3.)  Adopt a Trail or Shelter, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

 

Help enhance the hiking experience for everyone by becoming a Long Trail adopter.  We can help you get started on basic maintenance of a trail or shelter.  Whether you want to volunteer on your own, with your family, or with your outing group, maintaining the Long Trail is a great way to give a little back to the Green Mountains.  For a current listing of available trails and shelters click here or contact Thorin Markison at tmarkinson@greenmountainclub.org.

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/page.php?id=388

 

4.)  Bark Mulch Packers, Backcountry Composting Sites, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

 

Mulch Packers carry 40-50 lb. bags of bark mulch into backcountry shelters over rugged terrain for use at composting privy sites. This is an excellent opportunity to prepare for backpacking trips and scheduling is flexible to meet your needs.

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/images/File/Shawn_Flanigan/Bark_Mulch_Packer_01_03_2008.pdf

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/page.php?id=9

 

5.)  Interpretive Volunteers, Santa Clara County, Open Space Authority, San Jose, CA

 

Interpretation is about providing an enjoyable nature experience and a positive memory. A comfortable and fun environment encourages people to make connections between their lives and the natural world. Visitors learn through conversations, activities, stories, and close observation of their surroundings. The goal is to leave them with a sense of nature’s value and significance rather than filling them up with facts.

 

The OSA program explores a wide range of topics related to the open space areas of Santa Clara County. Hikes and activities are designed to appeal to people of different ages, backgrounds and levels of outdoor experience.

 

Volunteers have the opportunity to serve as interpretive docents or aides and lead or help with hikes, activities and outreach events.

 

Interpretive Aides

 

Helping at events, day camps, hikes and other OSA activities can be a one-time volunteer job or an ongoing commitment. Aides will have the chance to receive training in the materials and activities used to engage the interest and curiosity of young visitors.

 

Docents

 

Interpretive training photoInterpretive training

Being a docent is a chance to share your personal interest in nature or the cultural history of the south bay area and have a good time doing it. Docents can learn how to present OSA programs on topics such as early Ohlone Indians or mountain lions. And they can work under the direction of the Interpreter to develop an appropriate nature program on a favorite subject of their own. All docents need is an interest in the outdoors and a desire to help others learn.

 

Besides learning about the different subjects relevant to open space preservation, docents will receive training in such interpretive skills as how to work with groups, create interesting programs and use hands-on materials. Docents-in-training will also have the opportunity to partner with experienced docents and interpreters in front of “live” audiences in order to polish their skills.

 

For more information, call Interpreter Teri Rogoway at 408-224-7476 or send an email to trogoway@openspaceauthority.org.

http://www.openspaceauthority.org/volunteer/interpretivevolunteers.html

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Lead paddler 2015, Coastal Odyssey/kayak more tomorrow, Ålesund, Norway

http://kayakmoretomorrow.com/about/careers/job-application/lead-paddler/

 

2.)  Waitstaff, Turpin Meadow Ranch, Jackson Hole, Wyoming

http://www.coolworks.com/turpin-meadow-ranch/help-wanted-now/3654-passionate-about-the-outdoors-spend-a-winter-with-

 

3.)  University of Minnesota Recreation, Park & Leisure Studies Dept. Outdoor Recreation Immersion Semester.

http://www.cehd.umn.edu/future/undergraduate/majors/Recreation/default.html

 

4.)  Government Relations Internship, The Wilderness Society, Washington, DC

https://jobs.washingtonpost.com/job/35698534/government-relations-internship/

 

5.)  Communcations Manager, Four Corners, The Wilderness Society, Denver, CO

https://home.eease.adp.com/recruit2/?id=11275701&t=1

 

6.)  Trail Guide, Wilderness Inquiry, Minneapolis, MN

http://intranet.wildernessinquiry.org/jobinator/jobdesc_detail.php?j=1

 

7.)  Adventure Forest, Wilderness at the Smokies, Sevierville, TN

http://www.wildernessatthesmokies.com/employment

 

8.)  Senior Director of Marketing and Communications, Sustainable Travel International, New York, Oregon, or Washington, DC

 

Sustainable Travel International is seeking an experienced and highly motivated marketing and communications professional to lead the development and implementation of our organizational marketing strategy and plan. This is a significant opportunity for a high-performing individual to join our team’s effort to redefine travel and tourism as a force for good, while positively impacting lives in tourism communities worldwide.

 

Sustainable Travel International is preparing to launch a major global campaign, which will enable us to achieve our organizational goals and catalyze new partnerships. This new member of our core team will play a critical role in the development and evolution of this initiative, and will help us to shape and share the resulting stories of impact.

 

As Senior Director of Marketing and Communications, you will be:

 

The Gatekeeper of Our Brand: You will help to raise the visibility and value of Sustainable Travel International’s brand, while enhancing public perceptions of the ways in which the organization is redefining travel and tourism as a force for good, and the ways in which tourism is a means for social change. This will be achieved through enhancement and refinement of our existing brand platform, and improvement of the tools utilized by the team to fundraise, develop partnerships, and communicate impact.

A Strategic Planner with Specialized Expertise and Passion for Marketing and Communications: You will be responsible for the development of our annual marketing and communications strategy across different marketing mediums, including traditional and digital. You will also develop and execute a cause-based marketing campaign focused on positively impacting the lives of 10 million residents of tourism destinations around the world by 2025 (10in10), which we plan to launch in March 2015.

A Tactician with a Desire to Roll Up Your Sleeves: Working closely with a support team and other key internal partners, you will be responsible for the development and implementation of the subsequent tactical marketing and communications plans. This will include the development and implementation of marketing campaigns tied to specific metrics and the development of consistent, compelling brand communications that resonate with target audiences and help the organization to exceed its fundraising and partnership development goals. You will also be a contributing member of our partnership development team, rolling up your sleeves to fundraise and secure new partners where appropriate.

 

Responsibilities

Primary Duties and Core Responsibilities

 

  • Develop annual marketing and communications strategy, and set strategic marketing direction to support overall organization strategy and goals.
  • Establish and implement annual marketing plan which clearly defines the goals and tactics needed to achieve marketing goals and increase the reach and impact of all marketing campaigns
  • Utilize systems such as Salesforce.com to track and report all campaign results, identify new trends and recommend improved and innovative campaign approaches.
  • Provide marketing and communications guidance and project leadership to all team members, and act as lead marketing resource for staff, board members, and other members of the support team
  • Plan, develop and manage the implementation of effective cause-based campaigns that support fundraising, partnership development, and program growth and retention.
  • Utilize a mix of traditional outreach and new media as appropriate to achieve marketing and organizational goals while staying within budget, including:
  • Plan, manage and oversee all social media presence including publishing engaging and quality content, implementing social media campaigns, tracking trends and best practices and incorporating new techniques and applications.
  • Create, implement and oversee all e-marketing communications and campaigns, including webinars
  • Determine the most effective way to spend advertising dollars. Develop and execute an advertising plan including online, print and multi-media.
  • Take a lead role in planning, organizing, and managing elements of key internal and external events, such as trade shows and conferences.
  • Manage external and internal resources to develop effective and compelling marketing materials that are appropriate for target audiences, including:
  • Develop content and key messages to support all marketing initiatives and provide extensive editing support to ensure quality and consistency in all communications.
  • Monitor and help to update website content to ensure its ongoing usability, relevance and accuracy.
  • Identify and develop testimonials and stories from beneficiaries of Sustainable Travel International’s work, including residents in tourism destinations, volunteers, donors and staff for use throughout internal and external communications efforts.
  • Plan, coordinate and direct video shoots, and manage the editing and production process to create compelling videos for multiple uses.
  • Develop and cultivate a library of presentation materials to be used in partner development and engagement, and in global speaking opportunities.
  • Manage budget and financial projections for organizational marketing and related campaigns.
  • Monitor industry, market and non-profit trends, research and analyze audience data and feedback, and recommend strategic or tactical changes accordingly.

 

Qualifications

Requirements

 

  • Demonstrated experience developing and implementing marketing and communications strategies and plans
  • Demonstrated experience achieving specific goals in fundraising and partnership development
  • Evidence of successful leadership of marketing campaigns
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills
  • Ability to effectively engage and convey ideas to cross–functional technical and non-technical teams as well as senior level executives in a corporate setting
  • An entrepreneurial spirit and creative approach
  • A proven ability to thrive in an environment that is characterized by significant growth, diversity and constant change
  • A proven ability to prioritize and multi-task, work efficiently and consider a wide variety of perspectives
  • Solid understanding of systems required to manage marketing performance and deliver on marketing tactics; interest in learning new technologies and tools in order to develop organizational best practices
  • Passion for travel, sustainability, and social responsibility

 

Preferred

 

  • Master’s Degree or higher in a marketing and communications-related field of study

Experience in a non-profit environment

 

Requirements/Other

  • We operate a virtual office environment, however candidates must be located within two hours of our offices in Portland, Oregon, Washington, DC, or New York City. Opportunities exist to work part-time from home and part-time from an office.

 

How to Apply

Complete your application by submitting your cover letter and resume here: http://ht-jobs.net/97KDQ73

 

Sustainable Travel International

(http://www.sustainabletravel.org)

 

http://philanthropynewsdigest.org/jobs/13232-senior-director-of-marketing-and-communications

 

9.)  Communications Manager, WWF Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

 

WWF, the Global Conservation Organization, through its office in Kenya, is seeking to recruit key strategic roles for its National programme as listed below:

 

The successful candidate will work under the direction of Director, Business Development and Communications to ensure strategic promotion of the WWF Kenya Brand and to ensure that effective and strategic communication strongly supports resource mobilization from diverse partners, ensuring widespread engagement and dissemination to key target groups, including policy, business, network members and the general public.

 

Among others, the key duties and responsibilities include:

  • Works in close partnership with WWF Kenya SMT and programme teams to develop, organize and deliver effective internal and external public relations & communications strategies, building WWF Kenya public recognition and network profile.
  • Participates in developing, orchestrating and implementing strategic outreach programmes and campaigns to positively shape the thinking and public policy outcomes on conservation.
  • Provides support to fundraising team in designing fundraising information as part of the wider resource mobilization strategy;
  • Provides leadership and supervises the communication team.
  • Coordinates setting of both departmental work plans and staff performance targets and undertakes periodic performance appraisal for communication staff;

The prospective candidate should possess:

  • An advanced university degree in Communications, Public Relations, Media Relations, or other related fields;
  • Proven track record, and at least 7 years’ experience (Preferably in Kenya) in communications or PR
  • Member of Public Relations Society of Kenya;
  • Understanding of institutional and legal framework in Kenya as it relates to PR, media and communications issues;

A good understanding of the realities of PR and communications for promoting conservation issues;

For a detailed Job description, kindly visit: http://wwf.panda.org/who_we_are/wwf_offices/kenya/

Interested candidates who wish to apply for the above position and who meet the above requirements should submit a cover letter and CV to: HResource@wwfkenya.org not later than 15th December 2014.

WWF Kenya

ACS Plaza, 5th Floor, Lenana Road,

P.O Box 62440-00200

Nairobi, Kenya

+254 20 3877355

+254 20 3872630/1

http://wwf.panda.org/who_we_are/jobs/?234111/Communications-Manager—WWF-Kenya

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2014 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

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Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for November 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for November 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com
“Wild beasts and birds are by right not the property merely of the people who are alive today, but the property of unknown generations, whose belongings we have no right to squander.”

– Theodore Roosevelt

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu
This edition of “Your very next step” comes to you from San Diego, California

 

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.
***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:
***  Ned’s upcoming travel

***  Travel Tip: Visiting National Parks in the Off Season

***  Why you should visit national parks in the off-season

***  Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™

***  Virginia Feral Hog Action Team newsletter

***  10 Airlines That Still Give Flyers Free Perks

***  The Top 10 Air Travel Pet Peeves

***  Travel with the National Parks Conservation Association

***  Rail Trail of the Month:

 

New Jersey’s Columbia Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteers/Internships, Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge, Calipatria, Ca.

2.)  Habitat Restoration and Assessment Surveys, Sky Island Alliance, Tucson, AZ

3.)  Adopt a Trail or Shelter, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

4.)  Bark Mulch Packers, Backcountry Composting Sites, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

5.)  Interpretive Volunteers, Santa Clara County, Open Space Authority, San Jose, CA

 

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Lead paddler 2015, Coastal Odyssey/kayak more tomorrow, Ålesund, Norway

2.)  Waitstaff, Turpin Meadow Ranch, Jackson Hole, Wyoming

3.)  University of Minnesota Recreation, Park & Leisure Studies Dept. Outdoor Recreation Immersion Semester.

 

4.)  Press Secretary , Conservation Law Foundation, Boston, MA

5.)  Government Relations Internship, The Wilderness Society, Washington, DC

6.)  Communcations Manager, Four Corners, The Wilderness Society, Denver, CO

7.)  Trail Guide, Wilderness Inquiry, Minneapolis, MN

8.)  Adventure Forest, Wilderness at the Smokies, Sevierville, TN

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!
*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel, maybe, perhaps:

 

November 18-20, San Diego, California

 

November 24-27, Doha, Qatar

 

December 8-10, Aubu Dhabi, UAE

 

January 27-30    Genoa, Italy

 

***  Travel Tip: Visiting National Parks in the Off Season

http://petergreenberg.com/2014/10/06/travel-tip-visiting-national-parks-season/

 

***  Why you should visit national parks in the off-season

http://www.foxnews.com/travel/2014/11/05/why-should-visit-national-parks-in-off-season/

 

***  Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™

 

The Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™ (officially recognized by the U.S. EPA) has engaged tens of thousands of young volunteers (kids, teens, and college-age youth) from around the world in environmental cleanup and conservation projects since 1999. This program has received multiple awards from the City of Albuquerque, a “Best Community Impact” award from Eastern Kentucky University, and is featured on thousands of web sites. View recent Apprentice Ecologist Projects and past Apprentice Ecologist Awards to get ideas for your own environmental stewardship project. The goals of the Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™ are to:

 

  • Elevate youth into leadership roles by engaging them in environmental cleanup and conservation projects,
  • Empower young people to rebuild the environmental and social well-being of our communities,
  • Improve local living conditions for both citizens and wildlife through education, activism, and action.

 

Here’s how to become an official Apprentice Ecologist and be considered for a scholarship:

 

  • Conduct your own environmental stewardship project in 2014 .
  • Take a few digital photos of your project in action.
  • Write an essay about your project and what it meant to you.
  • Register and upload your favorite project photo along with your essay.

 

Examples of projects that other Apprentice Ecologists have completed in the past include:

 

  • Removing and recycling trash from a local park, river, beach, or other natural area
  • Planting native trees at a school, local park, or in a deforested area
  • Starting a community or school recycling/composting program
  • Protecting a terrestrial or aquatic area for native wildlife
  • Promoting the conservation of an endangered species or area
  • Educating others about wildlife or conservation issues
  • Removing graffiti from natural areas
  • Taking steps to prevent pollution/contamination locally
  • Removing nonnative vegetation so that native vegetation can flourish
  • Improving awareness about the importance of using renewable energy sources
  • Reducing soil erosion by maintaining established trails and closing off short-cuts
  • Assisting the elderly with their yards by planting/maintaining vegetation that provides native wildlife habitat

 

Building a rain garden that utilizes roof runoff to grow vegetation that provides native wildlife habitat

After uploading your project photo and essay, we will publish your work on our Global Registry of Apprentice Ecologists and provide links to download an official Apprentice Ecologist heat transfer (for T-shirt). Please only upload an image that you took or one that you have permission to post (this avoids copyright problems). If you do not have a project photo, simply upload the NWP logo image along with your essay. An NWP tote bag (made with organic cotton) will be awarded to the authors of the 10 best essays on an annual basis. School and community groups, especially those working with at-risk and disadvantaged youth, are highly encouraged to participate.

 

Three scholarships totaling $850 will be awarded annually to the authors of the three best Apprentice Ecologist essays. The top author will also receive a personalized crystal award courtesy of Crown Awards & Trophies. By registering and submitting your essay, you will automatically be considered for a scholarship. Be sure to include your full contact information (always private) when registering so that we can process any scholarships/awards that you may win. Scholarships are available to any student (ages 13 to 21) who is a candidate for a degree/diploma at a primary (middle school), secondary (high school), or accredited post-secondary (undergraduate at college or university) educational institution from any country around the world. The award covers 1) tuition and fees to enroll in or attend an accredited post-secondary (undergraduate or graduate at college or university) educational institution and/or 2) fees, books, supplies, and equipment required for courses. Applicants should embody the spirit of the Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™ by demonstrating personal leadership, initiative, and environmental stewardship in their project. Essays will be judged by a committee of Nicodemus Wilderness Project board members, volunteers, and past Apprentice Ecologist award winners. Please see tips below for additional elements that the committee considers important when judging essays.

While there is no minimum/maximum length for essays, most of our past winners have written essays that ranged from about 750 to 1,500 words long. The deadline for uploading your Apprentice Ecologist project essay is midnight GMT on December 31, 2014 .

Winners of the annual Apprentice Ecologist Awards will be published online on Earth Day (April 22).

 

Note: There is a separate Apprentice Ecologist Open Space Initiative scholarship if your project benefitted any lands managed or co-managed by the City of Albuquerque’s Open Space Division.

 

Important tips for writing an award-winning essay about your Apprentice Ecologist project:

 

Briefly describe your personal background and why you chose to do an Apprentice Ecologist project on behalf of the Nicodemus Wilderness Project.

 

  • Name and describe the area where you conducted your project.
  • Provide details about what you did and accomplished during your project.
  • If your project was part of a multi-year effort, focus your essay on the work that you conducted in 2014 .
  • Describe why you think it is important to take care of the area where you conducted your project.
  • Explain how your project helps benefit your community and the environment.
  • Describe how your Apprentice Ecologist Project has helped to enrich your life and what it has inspired you to do in the future.
  • Check and correct any spelling and grammatical errors prior to submitting your essay.

 

Important tips for conducting a safe and successful Apprentice Ecologist project:

 

  • Listen to weather reports and plan your project accordingly.
  • Always stay with at least one other person. Teams of three or more are preferable.
  • Make sure that someone knows where, when, and for how long you will be out.
  • Look out for poisonous plants, venomous snakes, and stinging insects.
  • Leave syringes and needles alone! Notify authorities about their location.
  • Bring or wear: boots, gloves, hat, sunscreen, first aid kit, water, food.
  • Notify landowners about your plans prior to conducting your project.

If you need help or have questions, you can contact us any time at: mail@wildernessproject.org.

 

http://www.wildernessproject.org/volunteer_apprentice_ecologist.php

 

***  Virginia Feral Hog Action Team newsletter

http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/feral-hogs/pdf/the-sounder-october-2014.pdf

 

***  10 Airlines That Still Give Flyers Free Perks

http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/flights/2014/10/30/free-flight-amenities/18115351/

 

***  The Top 10 Air Travel Pet Peeves

http://successfulmeetings.com/Strategy/SM-Top-10/The-Top-10-Air-Travel-Pet-Peeves/?cid=eltrTop10

 

***  Travel with the National Parks Conservation Association

http://www.npca.org/exploring-our-parks/travel-with-npca/

 

***  Rail Trail of the Month:

 

New Jersey’s Columbia Trail

http://www.railstotrails.org/trailblog/2014/october/16/new-jerseys-columbia-trail/

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteers/Internships, Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge, Calipatria, Ca.

http://www.fws.gov/saltonsea/volunteer.html

 

2.)  Habitat Restoration and Assessment Surveys, Sky Island Alliance, Tucson, AZ

http://www.skyislandalliance.org/volunteer.htm

 

3.)  Adopt a Trail or Shelter, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

 

Help enhance the hiking experience for everyone by becoming a Long Trail adopter.  We can help you get started on basic maintenance of a trail or shelter.  Whether you want to volunteer on your own, with your family, or with your outing group, maintaining the Long Trail is a great way to give a little back to the Green Mountains.  For a current listing of available trails and shelters click here or contact Thorin Markison at tmarkinson@greenmountainclub.org.

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/page.php?id=388

 

4.)  Bark Mulch Packers, Backcountry Composting Sites, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

 

Mulch Packers carry 40-50 lb. bags of bark mulch into backcountry shelters over rugged terrain for use at composting privy sites. This is an excellent opportunity to prepare for backpacking trips and scheduling is flexible to meet your needs.

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/images/File/Shawn_Flanigan/Bark_Mulch_Packer_01_03_2008.pdf

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/page.php?id=9

 

5.)  Interpretive Volunteers, Santa Clara County, Open Space Authority, San Jose, CA

 

Interpretation is about providing an enjoyable nature experience and a positive memory. A comfortable and fun environment encourages people to make connections between their lives and the natural world. Visitors learn through conversations, activities, stories, and close observation of their surroundings. The goal is to leave them with a sense of nature’s value and significance rather than filling them up with facts.

 

The OSA program explores a wide range of topics related to the open space areas of Santa Clara County. Hikes and activities are designed to appeal to people of different ages, backgrounds and levels of outdoor experience.

 

Volunteers have the opportunity to serve as interpretive docents or aides and lead or help with hikes, activities and outreach events.

 

Interpretive Aides

 

Helping at events, day camps, hikes and other OSA activities can be a one-time volunteer job or an ongoing commitment. Aides will have the chance to receive training in the materials and activities used to engage the interest and curiosity of young visitors.

 

Docents

 

Interpretive training photoInterpretive training

Being a docent is a chance to share your personal interest in nature or the cultural history of the south bay area and have a good time doing it. Docents can learn how to present OSA programs on topics such as early Ohlone Indians or mountain lions. And they can work under the direction of the Interpreter to develop an appropriate nature program on a favorite subject of their own. All docents need is an interest in the outdoors and a desire to help others learn.

 

Besides learning about the different subjects relevant to open space preservation, docents will receive training in such interpretive skills as how to work with groups, create interesting programs and use hands-on materials. Docents-in-training will also have the opportunity to partner with experienced docents and interpreters in front of “live” audiences in order to polish their skills.

 

For more information, call Interpreter Teri Rogoway at 408-224-7476 or send an email to trogoway@openspaceauthority.org.

http://www.openspaceauthority.org/volunteer/interpretivevolunteers.html

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Lead paddler 2015, Coastal Odyssey/kayak more tomorrow, Ålesund, Norway

http://kayakmoretomorrow.com/about/careers/job-application/lead-paddler/

 

2.)  Waitstaff, Turpin Meadow Ranch, Jackson Hole, Wyoming

http://www.coolworks.com/turpin-meadow-ranch/help-wanted-now/3654-passionate-about-the-outdoors-spend-a-winter-with-

 

3.)  University of Minnesota Recreation, Park & Leisure Studies Dept. Outdoor Recreation Immersion Semester.

http://www.cehd.umn.edu/future/undergraduate/majors/Recreation/default.html

 

***  From Carol Gregory: 

 

4.)  Press Secretary , Conservation Law Foundation, Boston, MA

 

Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) seeks a proactive and strategic Press Secretary with advocacy, political and/or campaign experience to oversee the nonprofit environmental organization’s day-to-day external communications and media outreach. The Press Secretary must have strong relationships with national and New England news decision makers (reporters, broadcast producers, editorial boards, influential bloggers), a proven track record for generating positive earned media coverage, excellent writing skills, an innate understanding of leveraging the changing digital landscape to increase visibility, and the ability to turn complex topics into messages that resonate with various audiences. S/he will take the lead on identifying opportunities and platforms for increasing CLF’s visibility, training CLF staff as spokespeople, monitoring the news, and preparing media reports for key stakeholders. The Press Secretary is a member of the Communications and Marketing Department, and reports to the Vice President of Communications and Marketing.

Key Responsibilities and Duties:

  • Serves as the lead on all media outreach and is the point of contact for media calls and inquiries.
  • Develops, strengthens, and maintains regular contact with news decision makers including reporters, broadcast producers, editors, and influential bloggers on both the regional and national level.
  • Turns CLF’s work into newsworthy stories, and takes the lead on pitching those stories to media (print, broadcast, online).
  • Monitors news and develops rapid response to relevant breaking stories that are opportunities for pushing CLF’s position, programs, and experts. Must be able to write quickly under pressure, and efficiently collaborate with advocacy staff in creating and implementing efficient and rapid response.
  • Identifies strategic media targets and maintains media database.
  • Writes or edits external content for media including press releases, news advisories, statements, and opinion pieces.
  • Oversees and plans press events including press conferences, teleconferences, and other press events ensuring all participants are trained and prepared to deliver CLF’s core messages. Must frequently work within coalitions and ensure CLF’s position and spokespeople receive visibility.
  • Keeps abreast of current and emerging advances in digital communications including areas of information dissemination, social media platforms, and multimedia.
  • Closely monitors environmental news and events to identify and develop media outreach plans.
  • Prepares media analysis and reports for executive staff and board of directors.
  • Some travel in New England required.
  • Other duties as assigned.

 

Experience

  • Bachelor’s degree in a related field required
  • Minimum of 5 to 10 years experience leading advocacy, campaign, or campaign media relations in a fast-paced environment
  • Knowledge of AP style guidelines
  • Proficiency in video and photo editing software a plus
  • Knowledge of environmental issues including energy, climate change, and clean water preferred

 

Salary and Benefits

CLF offers a competitive salary, an extensive benefits plan, and an open and accepting work environment where differences are highly respected.

To Apply

Send your resume titled “your last name-first initial-resume” (e.g., “SMITH J RESUME”) and a detailed cover letter titled “your last name-first initial-cover” (e.g., “SMITH J COVER”) to careers@clf.org.  Please make “Press Secretary” the subject of your e-mail. The position will remain open until filled. Absolutely no phone calls or in-person visits please.

5.)  Government Relations Internship, The Wilderness Society, Washington, DC

https://jobs.washingtonpost.com/job/35698534/government-relations-internship/

 

6.)  Communcations Manager, Four Corners, The Wilderness Society, Denver, CO

https://home.eease.adp.com/recruit2/?id=11275701&t=1

 

8.)  Trail Guide, Wilderness Inquiry, Minneapolis, MN

http://intranet.wildernessinquiry.org/jobinator/jobdesc_detail.php?j=1

 

9.)  Adventure Forest, Wilderness at the Smokies, Sevierville, TN

http://www.wildernessatthesmokies.com/employment

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.
*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2014 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for October 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for October 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com
“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.”

– L.M. Montgomery

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu
This edition of “Your very next step” comes to you from Nassau, Bahamas.

 

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.
***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:
***  Ned’s upcoming travel

***  “The Most Epic Safety Video Every Made.”

***  Carolina Mountain Club Hike Leader Guidelines

***  Kalaeloa Airport

***  Flight Delays Are Mostly Airlines’ Faults? Yes, Says a Pilot

***  Why TSA Is Letting More People Into the Line Where They Can Keep on Their Shoes, Belt

***  The Seven Most Annoying Myths About Flying

***  The Smart Floors Making Airports More Accessible for Disabled Travelers

***  The “America the Beautiful” Volunteer Pass

***  Rail Trail of the Month: October 2014 – New Jersey’s Columbia Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Adopt a Trail or Shelter, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

2.)  Bark Mulch Packers, Backcountry Composting Sites, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

3.) Interpretive Volunteers, Santa Clara County, Open Space Authority, San Jose, CA

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Park Ranger – Part-time, City of Round Rock, Round Rock, Texas

2.)  Press Secretary, Conservation Law Foundation, Boston, MA

3.)  Park & Recreation Ranger, Sterling State Park, State of Michigan, Monroe, MI

4.)  PARK NATURALISTS, LONG KEY STATE PARK; MONROE COUNTY, State of Florida, Long Key, FL

5.)  Park Ranger I (2 openings), City of Austin, Austin, TX

6.)  Park Ranger I, City of Hollywood, Hollywood, FL

7.)  Parks Manager – Recreations and Aquatics, City of Hollywood, Hollywood, FL

8.)  Natural Resources Specialist (Ranger) (Recent Graduate), Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Copan, OK

9.)  Natural Resources Specialist (Park Ranger), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Peck, MT

10.)  Conservation Officer, Department of Natural Resources, Lansing, Michigan

11.)  Park Ranger, LEGOLAND, Carlsbad, CA

13.)  Open Space Operations Superintendent, City of Aurora, Aurora, CO

14.)  Residential Outdoor Science Instructor, Full Time – Seasonal Position March-November 2015,

Sierra Nevada Journeys’ Grizzly Creek Ranch Campus, Portola, California

15.)  Recreation Manager, Fairmont Orchid, Kohala Coast, HI

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!
*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel, maybe, perhaps:

 

October 27-28, Norfolk, VA

 

October 29-30, Nassau, Bahamas

 

November 24-27, Doha, Qatar

 

December 8-10, Aubu Dhabi, UAE

 

January 27-30    Genoa, Italy

 

***  “The Most Epic Safety Video Every Made.”

 

And Elijah Wood, doesn’t even look stricken…

 

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2014/10/22/16454/562/travel/Buckle+Up+with+Elijah+Wood+in+%27The+Most+Epic+Safety+Video+Ever+Made%27

 

***  Carolina Mountain Club Hike Leader Guidelines

 

(Ned notes:  Normally I’d post this with the volunteer opportunities, but it has some very interesting information and valuable advice for everyone who go forth into the great outdoors, especially with groups.)

 

CMC leads well over 200 hikes per year. This requires many hike leaders. Each needs some hiking experience and leadership training, and needs to commit to leading at least one hike per year.

 

Leading a hike takes a little more time than just hiking, because the hike needs to be scouted ahead of time, and there is some preparation and paperwork required. But leading a hike can be fun, and is a great way to really learn the trails you lead hikes on, and the routes to the trails. You can find your own strengths and build on them as you develop your own style and hike preferences as a leader.

 

Become a Leader with the Carolina Mountain ClubHiking is a healthful, social and pleasant activity, and hikers enjoy meeting and conversing with their fellow hikers.  Hike leaders will enjoy the opportunity to interact with the other hikers and to lead an activity where everyone is up-beat, friendly and enjoying their day in the woods.  These guidelines will help the hike leader to make the hike a successful experience for all.

 

Preparing Hike Description

 

  1. A hike description must be prepared for Let’s Go. This description will usually be prepared by the hike scheduler, with the assistance of the hike leader. Information sources are the hike database, previous hike sign-up sheets, the hike leader, and/or the hike scheduler. The hike description will include:

 

Text describing hike

Hike length

Cumulative hike ascent

GPS information, if available

Type of hike (in & out, loop, car shuttle or key swap)

Driving distance

A requirement for reservations if the number of hikers is to be limited (NOTE: Wilderness areas are limited to 10 hikers);

Starting time and meeting place.  NOTE:  CMC guidelines require hikes to end one hour before sunset (all-day hikes) or 30 minutes before sunset (half-day hikes)

List second meeting place and meeting time, if to be used

  1. The Hike scheduler will prepare the text and send it to the hike Leader for proof-reading and approval.

 

Month Before the Hike

 

  1. Scout the hike, preferably within one month of the hike, to verify:

 

Trail accessibility and condition

Adequate parking at trailhead

A desirable lunch or snack stop

Points of interest along the trail

Hiking time

  1. If the scout results in changes to the hike or if the leader wants to communicate additional information about the hike, the leader can post the information as a scout report. This will be put in the hiking schedule on the website. This could also be an opportunity to promote the hike with more text than Let’s Go descriptions allow.  A picture could be included as well.

 

  1. Obtain permission to park and/or hike across private property, if required;

 

  1. Answer phone calls and e-mails concerning questions about the hike;

 

  1. Make a reservation list for any hike with an attendance limit.

 

  1. Although not a requirement, preparation of a hike map for distribution to hikers (especially for complicated routes) is always appreciated by the hikers.

 

Day of Hike (before hike)

 

As a Hike Leader you have obligations to your Hikers1. As hike leader, you have the right and obligation to:

 

Limit the number of hikers, if necessary;

Exclude those who, in the opinion of the leader, are not physically capable or experienced, or not properly clothed and equipped for the  hike.  Especially take note of footwear on new hikers;

Change the hike from the printed description if trail conditions have changed, particularly if hiker safety will be jeopardized.  Avoid changing the difficulty of the hike significantly.  If the hike has changed, be very clear, at the meeting places, what the changes are.

  1. Assume full charge and responsibility for the trip. Appoint a sweep who is a strong hiker and who will accept responsibility for checking the hiker count and assuring that no one is lost.

 

  1. Take a simple first aid kit. Both the leader and sweep should carry whistles for communication.  Optionally, a cell phone can also be taken, although reception is sometimes poor in the mountains.  For cold weather hiking, carry extra food rations, a space blanket, light source and matches.

 

  1. Meet the hikers at the primary meeting place, or appoint someone to represent you. If the hike is canceled, the leader or representative must still go to all meeting places to inform hikers of the cancelation (unless driving conditions are hazardous).

 

  1. At the meeting places ask: a) Is anyone allergic to anything, particularly bee stings?; b) Does anyone have a health or medical condition that could be influenced by this hike?; c) Are there any conditions that could cause the hiker to slow down significantly?; d) Does everyone have any medications that they could possibly need on the hike? e) When was the last time that you went on a x mile hike? (and follow up with questions to determine fitness).

 

  1. Have all hikers sign the sign-in sheet, and do a head-count – Hike Sign-up Sheet

 

  1. Hike leaders should remember that hikes are social occasions and should take an opportunity at the beginning for everyone to introduce themselves if new hikers are present. Hikers new to the group should be educated as to proper hike etiquette and each hiker’s responsibility to the group (being mindful of the hiker behind as well as the one in front).

 

  1. Arrange car pooling and verify that everyone has a ride.

 

  1. Before leaving, explain the driving route to each driver and count the number of cars. For complicated routes, it is helpful to prepare a map for drivers.

 

  1. When driving to the trailhead, drive at a speed that enables the following cars to keep up. When making a turn, assure that all cars have made the turn.

 

Day of Hike (during hike)

 

  1. The hiking pace should be controlled by the leader to keep all hikers within reasonable distance behind the leader. Occasionally, check that the sweep is visible to assure that the group stays together.

 

  1. Hikers must not go ahead of the leader or behind the sweep except by specific permission of the leader/sweep.

 

  1. The hike leader should stop at prudent intervals for:

 

Trail breaks

Rest and water stops

“Catch-up” stops to assure that slower hikers catch up with the rest of the hike, and to allow them resting time if needed (NOTE:  Beginning hikers especially get frustrated by a leader who hikes way ahead, then waits for everyone to catch up, and then starts hiking as soon as the last hiker shows up, without allowing the last hiker to rest)

Snack and lunch stops

  1. The hike leader must stop at all trail intersections, junctions or any place where there might be confusion, and assure that all hikers see the correct direction of travel. This usually requires that the leader wait until the sweep is visible.

 

  1. If the time needed to complete the hike would be later than the minimum “ending-time-before-sunset” time, the hike leader must stop the hike and return to the trailhead.

 

Day of Hike (End of Hike)

 

  1. The leader should give non-members a CMC application form and encourage them to join the club.

 

  1. Encourage a photographer to email a picture to the leader if the leader has not made one himself.

 

  1. If there is no map and GPS track of the hike on the website, encourage a hiker with a GPS to send the track to the Hiking Webmaster.

 

  1. The leader must not leave the trailhead until all hikers are present and all car engines have been started.

 

5 .If necessary (use personal judgment), lead the other drivers back to familiar roads.

 

After the Hike

 

  1. Prepare a short description of the hike and post the report on the website.

 

  1. Fill in the requested data on the back of the CMC Sign-in Sheet and mail it to the hike scheduler at the address listed. Your information and suggestions will be very helpful for the next time the same hike is scheduled.

 

Conclusion

 

Welcome to Carolina Mountain Club!Carolina Mountain Club thanks you for leading a hike for the club.

 

We hope you have enjoyed the experience and that you would like to lead another hike for us in the future!

 

http://www.carolinamountainclub.org/index.cfm/do/index.cfm/do/pages.view/id/107/page/Hike-Leader-Guidelines

 

***  Kalaeloa Airport :

 

Kalaeloa Airport (JRF), also called John Rodgers Field (the original name of Honolulu International Airport) and formerly was the Naval Air Station Barbers Point.  Kalaeloa is located between Honolulu and the western O’ahu communities of Ewa Beach, Kapolei, and Campbell Industrial Park.  Mokulele Airilines is pleased to announce that they will be the first-ever scheduled airline to provide service between Kalaeloa and Kahului, Maui on July 1st, 2014.

 

Kalaeloa, will provide hassle free commuting between O’ahu and the rest of the Hawaiian Islands.  This includes:  avoiding heavy traffic on the H1, no TSA screening, and free parking with a valid permit.  Kalaeloa will also provide an easier access to the Aulani Disney Resort & Spa on  the southwestern coast of O’ahu.

 

http://www.mokuleleairlines.com/kalaeloa-oahu.php

 

***  Flight Delays Are Mostly Airlines’ Faults? Yes, Says a Pilot

By Justin Bachman August 26, 2014

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-08-26/pilot-flight-delays-are-airlines-fault

 

***  Why TSA Is Letting More People Into the Line Where They Can Keep on Their Shoes, Belt

By Liz Klimas

 

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/09/08/security-issue-why-are-more-people-being-funneled-through-tsas-precheck-line-that-havent-gone-through-the-application-process/

 

***  The Seven Most Annoying Myths About Flying

http://www.askthepilot.com/seven-myths/

 

***  From Bernie Wagenblast’s TCN newsletter

 

The Smart Floors Making Airports More Accessible for Disabled Travelers

Link to article on Skift:

http://skift.com/2014/10/23/the-smart-floors-making-airports-more-accessible-for-disabled-travelers

 

 

***  The “America the Beautiful” Volunteer Pass

 

Volunteering for the Public Lands Just Got More Rewarding!

 

What are the benefits of the pass?

The pass covers entrance and/or standard amenity fees on lands managed by the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and Bureau of Reclamation, and the Department of Agriculture’s USDA Forest Service. Passes are valid for one year from the issuance date.

 

How can I qualify for a Volunteer Pass?

Accrue just 250 hours of volunteer service on participating Federal public lands, and you can receive the new Volunteer Pass in recognition of your efforts. Simply coordinate tracking of your hours with your volunteer supervisor or volunteer coordinator. For information on the “American the Beautiful” Federal Recreational Lands Pass Program, please contact your state volunteer coordinator.

 

Click here to locate your state coordinator: http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/res/Volunteer/contacts.html.

 

Download the America the Beautiful interagency pass program brochure: http://www.blm.gov/style/medialib/blm/wo/Law_Enforcement/nlcs/education__interpretation/volunteers.Par.21468.File.dat/America_Beautiful_Pass_Brochure.pdf.

 

***  Rail Trail of the Month: October 2014
New Jersey’s Columbia Trail

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Adopt a Trail or Shelter, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

 

Help enhance the hiking experience for everyone by becoming a Long Trail adopter.  We can help you get started on basic maintenance of a trail or shelter.  Whether you want to volunteer on your own, with your family, or with your outing group, maintaining the Long Trail is a great way to give a little back to the Green Mountains.  For a current listing of available trails and shelters click here or contact Thorin Markison at tmarkinson@greenmountainclub.org.

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/page.php?id=388

 

2.)  Bark Mulch Packers, Backcountry Composting Sites, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

 

Mulch Packers carry 40-50 lb. bags of bark mulch into backcountry shelters over rugged terrain for use at composting privy sites. This is an excellent opportunity to prepare for backpacking trips and scheduling is flexible to meet your needs.

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/images/File/Shawn_Flanigan/Bark_Mulch_Packer_01_03_2008.pdf

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/page.php?id=9

 

3.) Interpretive Volunteers, Santa Clara County, Open Space Authority, San Jose, CA

 

Interpretation is about providing an enjoyable nature experience and a positive memory. A comfortable and fun environment encourages people to make connections between their lives and the natural world. Visitors learn through conversations, activities, stories, and close observation of their surroundings. The goal is to leave them with a sense of nature’s value and significance rather than filling them up with facts.

 

The OSA program explores a wide range of topics related to the open space areas of Santa Clara County. Hikes and activities are designed to appeal to people of different ages, backgrounds and levels of outdoor experience.

 

Volunteers have the opportunity to serve as interpretive docents or aides and lead or help with hikes, activities and outreach events.

 

Interpretive Aides

 

Helping at events, day camps, hikes and other OSA activities can be a one-time volunteer job or an ongoing commitment. Aides will have the chance to receive training in the materials and activities used to engage the interest and curiosity of young visitors.

 

Docents

 

Interpretive training photoInterpretive training

Being a docent is a chance to share your personal interest in nature or the cultural history of the south bay area and have a good time doing it. Docents can learn how to present OSA programs on topics such as early Ohlone Indians or mountain lions. And they can work under the direction of the Interpreter to develop an appropriate nature program on a favorite subject of their own. All docents need is an interest in the outdoors and a desire to help others learn.

 

Besides learning about the different subjects relevant to open space preservation, docents will receive training in such interpretive skills as how to work with groups, create interesting programs and use hands-on materials. Docents-in-training will also have the opportunity to partner with experienced docents and interpreters in front of “live” audiences in order to polish their skills.

 

For more information, call Interpreter Teri Rogoway at 408-224-7476 or send an email to trogoway@openspaceauthority.org.

http://www.openspaceauthority.org/volunteer/interpretivevolunteers.html

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Park Ranger – Part-time, City of Round Rock, Round Rock, Texas

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/roundrock/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=980883

 

***  From Carol Gregory:

 

2.)  Press Secretary, Conservation Law Foundation, Boston, MA

 

Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) seeks a proactive and strategic Press Secretary with advocacy, political and/or campaign experience to oversee the nonprofit environmental organization’s day-to-day external communications and media outreach. The Press Secretary must have strong relationships with national and New England news decision makers, a proven track record for generating media coverage, excellent writing skills, expertise in leveraging digital platforms to increase visibility, and the ability to turn complex topics into messages that resonate with diverse audiences. The Press Secretary is a member of the Communications and Marketing Department, and reports to the Vice President of Communications and Marketing.

 

To Apply

Send your resume titled “your last name-first initial-resume” (e.g., “SMITH J RESUME”) and a detailed cover letter titled “your last name-first initial-cover” (e.g., “SMITH J COVER”) to careers@clf.org.  Please make “Press Secretary” the subject of your e-mail. The position will remain open until filled. Absolutely no phone calls or in-person visits please.

For a full description visit here:

http://www.clf.org/about-clf/employment-opportunities/#presssecretary

 

3.)  Park & Recreation Ranger, Sterling State Park, State of Michigan, Monroe, MI

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/michigan/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=978228

 

4.)  PARK NATURALISTS, LONG KEY STATE PARK; MONROE COUNTY, State of Florida, Long Key, FL

http://jobs.myflorida.com/viewjob.html?optlink-view=view-755012

 

5.)  Park Ranger I (2 openings), City of Austin, Austin, TX

https://www.austincityjobs.org/postings/45593

 

6.)  Park Ranger I, City of Hollywood, Hollywood, FL

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/hollywoodfl/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=981926

 

7.)  Parks Manager – Recreations and Aquatics, City of Hollywood, Hollywood, FL

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/hollywoodfl/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=981934

 

8.)  Natural Resources Specialist (Ranger) (Recent Graduate), Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Copan, OK

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/383084500

 

9.)  Natural Resources Specialist (Park Ranger), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Peck, MT

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/383464400

 

10.)  Conservation Officer, Department of Natural Resources, Lansing, Michigan

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/michigan/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=600429

 

11.)  Park Ranger, LEGOLAND, Carlsbad, CA

www.bit.ly/1qKzKUl

 

13.)  Open Space Operations Superintendent, City of Aurora, Aurora, CO

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/aurora/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=980239

 

14.)  Residential Outdoor Science Instructor, Full Time – Seasonal Position March-November 2015,

Sierra Nevada Journeys’ Grizzly Creek Ranch Campus, Portola, California

http://sierranevadajourneys.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Residential-Outdoor-Science-Instructor-2015.pdf

 

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

15.)  Recreation Manager, Fairmont Orchid, Kohala Coast, HI

http://bit.ly/1pHU0GO

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2014 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC – b
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

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Your Very Next Step newsletter for September 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for September 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com
“Our brightest blazes of gladness are commonly kindled by unexpected sparks.”

– Samuel Johnson

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

This edition of “Your very next step” comes to you from Florence, Italy.

 

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.
***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:
***  Ned’s upcoming travel

***  Air France Strike:

***  15 Must-See Literary Sights in London

***  AMERICA’S MOST SCENIC ROADS

***  AMERICA’S BEST FALL FOOD FESTIVALS

***  How to Become a Travel Writer

***  10 BEST U.S. TRAIN TRIPS TO TAKE THIS FALL

***  10 PLACES TO GO THIS FALL

***  10 Ultralight Backpacking Foods

***  How to Avoid Thunderstorms While Hiking and Backpacking

***  Avalanche Safety

***  NOLS Backcountry Lightening Safety Guidelines

***  Wilderness Emergency Medical Technician (WEMT)

***  The 10 Best Parks for Beach Camping

***  Trail of the Month:  Pennsylvania’s Allegheny River Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer opportunities, Chugach National Forest, Anchorage, Alaska

2.)  Volunteer opportunities, Mount Washington Volunteer Ski Patrol (MWVSP)/Mount Washington Avalanche Center, Pinkham Notch, NH

3.)  Backcountry Volunteer Opportunity, Zion National Park, Springdale, UT

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Arctic Lands Conservation Specialist, Wilderness Society, Anchorage, AK

2.)  Ski Patrol, SOLITUDE MOUNTAIN RESORT, Solitude, UT

3.)  Web Content Editor, The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), Boulder, CO

4.)  Digital and Social Media Manager, USA Cycling, Colorado Springs

6.)  Crown of the Continent Conservation Specialist, Wilderness Society, Bozeman, MT

7.)  Communications Manager, The Nature Conservancy, Montpelier, Vermont

8.)  CONSERVATION STAFF SPECIALIST II, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, State of Nevada, Ely, NV

9.)  PARK NATURALISTS, Long Key State Park, State of Florida, Long Key, FL

10.)  Field Operations Manager – Arizona, National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), Tucson, AZ

11.)  NOLS Curriculum Publications Manager, National Outdoor Leadership School, Lander, WY

12.)  Web Graphic Designer, Backcountry, Park City, UT

12.)  Public Relations Manager, Tourism Australia, New York, New York

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!
*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel, maybe, perhaps:

 

September 12-14, Charleston, S.C.

 

September 20-27, Florence, Italy

 

October 27-28, Norfolk, VA

 

October 29-30, Nassau, Bahamas

 

November 24-27, Doha, Qatar

 

December 8-10, Aubu Dhabi, UAE

 

January 27-30    Genoa, Italy

 

***  Air France Strike:

 

The air travel for our family vacation to Florenece, Italy, was booked on Air France.  However, Air France has a strike in effect now.

 

Due to some pilots’ strike action, from September 15th to 22nd, and due to the extension of the social movement from September 23rd to 26th, our flight schedule operated by Air France has been disrupted since Monday, September 15th, 2014.

 

According to the Air France web site, about half of all AF flights were being cancelled.  They also said all passengers would be notified by email flights regarding potential disruption (although we never received any email).  They said passengers would be notified 24 hours in  advance if their flights were being cancelled.  Anyone potentially affected could move their  flights until later.   We did not get any email, but our flight to Paris and on to Florenece departing on the 20th would be in the “window.”  When I learned about this on the 15th, I decided not to take a chance.  We had non-refundable tours and hotel reservations.  I called Delta and was able to rebook.  We had to leave a day earlier, which meant an extra night in our hotel in Florence, and our flights would take much longer.  We now would fly to Detroit and then Amsterdam, and then Florence after a 12 hour layover.

 

For several reasons we decided not attempt a foray into the city.  But I didn’t have the status to get us into the lounge.  We ended up getting a day pass for the KLM Crown lounge for 45 Euros each, which is steep, but worth it considering the circumstances.

 

(Update: The Air France pilots work stoppage has been extended to September 30th, which has affected our return travel on the 27th.  Our CDG-IAD flight is still on, but FLR-CDG is cancelled.  So I spent hours in the past few days trying to resolve this.  The result ithere are not optiond from Florence for four or more dayts.  As of last night I have arranged to get us to Rome to catch a Lufthansa flight to Frankfurt,and connect to a United Flight to Washington.  Stay tuned.)

 

***  15 Must-See Literary Sights in London

 

Whether you’re a fan of Shakespeare, Dickens, Keats, or other British scribes, London has plenty of activities for literature lovers.

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/15-must-see-literary-sights-in-london?ref=news_fd_083014

 

***  AMERICA’S MOST SCENIC ROADS

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/americas-most-scenic-roads#!1-intro

 

***  AMERICA’S BEST FALL FOOD FESTIVALS

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/americas-best-fall-food-festivals?obref=obinsite#!1-intro

 

***  How to Become a Travel Writer

By Andrea M. Rotondo

http://www.fodors.com/news/how-to-become-a-travel-writer-10773.html

 

***  10 BEST U.S. TRAIN TRIPS TO TAKE THIS FALL

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-best-us-train-trips-to-take-this-fall?obref=obinsite#!1-intro

 

***  10 PLACES TO GO THIS FALL

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-places-to-go-this-fall?obref=obnetwork#!1-intro

 

***  10 Ultralight Backpacking Foods

http://sectionhiker.com/10-ultralight-backpacking-foods/

 

***  How to Avoid Thunderstorms While Hiking and Backpacking

http://sectionhiker.com/how-to-avoid-thunderstorms-while-hiking-and-backpacking/

 

***  Avalanche Safety

http://www.avalanche.org/tutorial/tutorial.html

 

***  NOLS Backcountry Lightening Safety Guidelines

By John Gookin

http://rendezvous.nols.edu/files/Curriculum/research_projects/Risk%20Management%20Reports/NOLS%20Backcountry%20Lightning%20Safety%20Guidelines.pdf

 

***  Wilderness Emergency Medical Technician (WEMT)

A certification to get you a job in the front country or wilderness.

http://www.nols.edu/wmi/courses/wemt.shtml

 

***  The 10 Best Parks for Beach Camping

Top Ten Cheap All-Inclusive Resorts

http://www.tripcurator.com/p-caribbean-top-ten-budget-all-inclusive-resorts/

 

***  Trail of the Month: September 2014

 

Pennsylvania’s Allegheny River Trail

By Laura Stark

 

“The Allegheny River Trail is one great vista after another.”

 

Unparalleled natural beauty? Check. Welcoming towns with friendly people? Check. Unique historical sites and a smooth, easy riding surface? Check, check. The 32-mile Allegheny River Trail in northwestern Pennsylvania seemingly has it all for a perfect getaway. And it’s on the cusp of being even better; peak fall colors are expected to arrive in early to mid-October; the trail, lined with oaks, maples, elms and other tree varieties will be spectacular.

 

“The Allegheny River Trail is one great vista after another,” says Tom Sexton, RTC’s northeast regional director.

 

“It’s quite scenic, and you see wildlife constantly,” adds Kim Harris, project manager for the Oil Region Alliance of Business, Industry and Tourism. “Every time I’m on the trail, I see deer, and often wild turkeys and chipmunks galore. Many eagles are also spotted there because of the trail’s location by the river.”

 

Though the trail would be a worthwhile visit in and of itself, it’s directly connected to or near several others in the region. It serves as a key component of the growing Erie-to-Pittsburgh Trail, a 270-mile network comprised primarily of rail-trails, which is currently 60 percent complete. Earlier this month, locals got to experience the trail system firsthand on a 60-mile memorial bike ride to honor the trail’s guiding soul, the late Jim Holden, a man of warmth, drive and—most of all—vision.

 

“We had a wonderful event with about 50 participants,” says Harris, who organized the ride and is secretary of the Erie-to-Pittsburgh Trail Alliance. “It rained, but it didn’t dampen any spirits.”

 

Twenty-five years ago, such a trail system would have been a far-reaching and unlikely dream. Holden, a university professor and farmer, seeing that there were limited areas for safe cycling in his community, co-founded a nonprofit group called the Allegheny Valley Trails Association (AVTA) in 1990. With fellow university professor David Howes, he worked to acquire local unused rail corridors for conversion to rail-trails, and the Allegheny River Trail was their first success. The Sandy Creek Trail and Clarion Highlands Trail later followed, offering dozens of scenic miles of trail dotted with trestles, tunnels and other railroad relics across Clarion and Venango counties.

 

“Jim was one of the visionaries for the Erie-to-Pittsburgh Trail and the founding president of the Erie-to-Pittsburgh Trail Alliance,” says Harris. “He was an advocate for trails and for getting people to go outdoors and enjoy nature no matter what their skill level.”

 

Right off the bat, as one travels down the Allegheny River Trail, you know you’re in for a treat. Just five miles from its starting point in Franklin is the Belmar Bridge, its crisscrossing rusty-red beams a striking contrast to the tree-covered hillsides and the dark blue waters of the Allegheny, which it spans. The bridge, dating back to 1907, is part of the 12-mile Sandy Creek Trail, running above the Allegheny River Trail and unfurling east and west from the river. The two trails are linked by a stairwell, but a switchback is planned to make the connection more bike and wheelchair friendly; construction is likely to be completed next year.

 

For much of the journey, the river—designated a National Wild and Scenic River—is by your side. “It’s very popular with local canoers and kayakers,” says Bill Weller, AVTA president. “It’s not unusual to see 50 to 100 canoes and kayaks on the river in the summertime. It’s heavily used for water recreation.”

 

Two other highlights of the trail are its tunnels, both with dog-leg bends, so as one peers down their inky blackness, there’s no metaphorical light at the end of the tunnel. There are reflectors down the center and off to the sides to guide the way, but riders will need headlights for the venture. However, Harris notes that there is a friendly, retired gentleman who lives between the two tunnels who greets passersby, providing drinking water and headlamps to the unprepared.

 

Though bridges and tunnels make for a fun adventure, the Allegheny River Trail also offers something unusual for a rail-trail: petroglyphs. At about the eight-mile mark, right on the riverbank, sits Indian God Rock, a large sandstone boulder on which one can still see carvings of animals and people believed to have been created by Native Americans around A.D. 1200.

 

The main spine of the trail ends in Emlenton, but after a three-mile gap, a short, paved segment of trail picks up again in Foxburg and continues 2.6 miles south to end near the community of Parker. Unfortunately, there’s currently no easy way to navigate the gap by bicycle, but AVTA has their sights on closing the gap and is negotiating with the landowners there.

 

“We’re working on the right-of-way between Emlenton and Foxburg,” says Weller. “Right now, it’s an overgrown railroad grade.”

 

Residents of Foxburg are eager for the connection. The charming riverfront community offers restaurants, lodging, a winery and other businesses that could see a noticeable boost from bike tourists. The town also has the distinction of having the oldest continuous golf course in the United States; it was built in 1887.

 

“There has been increased excitement within the last two years,” says Harris. “You can just feel it. People are really talking about the trail.”

 

Sexton adds, “Venango County is very rural. To have this type of trail system there is impressive. If you want to move somewhere with access to a really great rural trail system, this is the place to go. There’s nowhere else like it.”

 

The future looks bright for this already popular and well-loved amenity. With the closing of its gap and the build-out of the Erie-to-Pittsburgh Trail network, it promises to only get better.

 

“Thank goodness for people with dreams,” says Weller of his friend and mentor, Jim Holden.

 

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/archives/1407.html

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer opportunities, Chugach National Forest, Anchorage, Alaska

 

Volunteers have become a very important part of the Forest Service workforce, helping out each year with everything from office work to trail maintenance. If you are interested in being a volunteer for the Forest Service in Alaska please contact:

Aaron Poe

Partnership & Volunteer Coordinator

Chugach National Forest

907-743-9568

http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/chugach/about-forest/jobs/?cid=STELPRDB5286341

 

2.)  Volunteer opportunities, Mount Washington Volunteer Ski Patrol (MWVSP)/Mount Washington Avalanche Center, Pinkham Notch, NH

http://www.mountwashingtonavalanchecenter.org/mount-washington-volunteer-ski-patrol/

 

3.)  Backcountry Volunteer Opportunity, Zion National Park, Springdale, UT

http://www.nps.gov/zion/supportyourpark/backcountry-volunteer-opportunity.htm

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Arctic Lands Conservation Specialist, Wilderness Society, Anchorage, AK

http://www.simplyhired.com/job/arctic-lands-conservation-specialist-job/the-wilderness-society/4f26534q7s

 

2.)  Ski Patrol, SOLITUDE MOUNTAIN RESORT, Solitude, UT

 

Solitude Mountain Resort is hiring full-time professional ski patrollers for the 2014-2015 season. Expert skiing skills and a current EMT or OEC certification is required. Previous ski patrol and avalanche work experience is recommended.

Contact: marvin@skisolitude.com

Close Date: 2014-10-31

http://www.avalanche.org/employment.php

 

3.)  Web Content Editor, The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), Boulder, CO

http://andrewhudsonsjobslist.com/index.cfm?PID=805&ID=9456,31733,0#j082514_10

 

4.)  Digital and Social Media Manager, USA Cycling, Colorado Springs

http://andrewhudsonsjobslist.com/index.cfm?PID=805&ID=9456,31733,0#j082514_11

 

5.)  Ski Patrol, HEAVENLY MOUNTAIN RESORT, Vail Resort, Cail, CO

 

Experienced Ski Patrol – Winter / Seasonal / Full Time – Heavenly

 

Job Summary:

Heavenly Ski Patrol’s primary responsibility is to provide and promote a safe environment for our guests and employees as well as to provide exceptional guest service. Ski Patrol is responsible for excecuting essential guest service functions such as responding to medical emergencies on the mountain, transporting injured guests off the mountain to appropriate facility, and general hill safety. Ski patrol is also responsible for enforcing safe skiing and riding practices, enforcement of the Skier’s and Rider’s Responsibility Code, interacting with unsafe guests, and educating our guests. Special circumstances include chairlift and gondola evacuation, avalanche control, and explosives handling. Other duties can be assigned as needed. Ski patrol is a highly visible role on the mountain, and a great deal of guest interaction is required. Please note: This position is posted for experienced Ski Patrol. If you do not have previous experience, please consider applyint to requisition ID 35944: Ski Patrol Apprentice.

 

Entry-level responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

Supervising and promoting guest safety on varied terrain in high altitude, with varying winter weather conditions

Provide guests with exceptional guest service

Assisting injured guests on the mountain and administering first aid

Transporting injured guests off the mountain using a toboggan or supporting air lift operations

Performing sweeps at the end of the day to ensure that all guests are safely off the mountain

Maintaining trails, identifying and mitigating hazards to our guests

Transporting and setting up mountain safety equipment

Transporting supplies and heavy equipment to areas of need on skis

Completing all the above with the utmost attention to personal and guest safety

Continuing on the job training

 

Intermediate level responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

All criteria listed for Entry Level, plus:

Avalanche control including safely transporting and placing explosives on the mountain and stabilizing snowpack and cornice edges on skis

Driving snowmobiles to various areas of the mountain, as needed

 

Advanced level responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

All criteria listed for Entry and Intermediate Level, plus:

Strong working knowledge and experience with snow safety

Assist with in house training

Attend advanced out of area trainings as assigned

Possession of advanced skills/certifications such as AIARE Level 2, Technical Rope Rescue training, etc.

 

Entry Level Requirements:

High School Diploma or Equivalent

Must be able to pass on-mountain ski test

Demonstrate, at minimum, a strong advanced skiing ability

California EMT or OEC certified with CPR for the professional rescuer- Must be certified by November 2013- required

Must be fluent in all aspects of the English language (spoken and written)

Some basic knowledge of computer – preferred

Must have excellent guest service skills

Must work well in a team

Must be able to work in inclement weather in a high alpine environment

Must have manual dexterity to operate equipment

Must successfully complete the Fit to Ride fitness assessment program

Must have sight, speech, and hearing abilities sufficient to learn skills, follow and provide directions

Must be available to work full time including holidays and weekends

Previous patrol experience – required, otherwise please apply for Patrol Apprentice position, which will be posted in July 2014

Must have the ability to pass a Criminal Background Check

 

Intermediate Level Requirements:

All criteria listed for Entry Level, plus:

CalOsha Blaster’s license – Preferred

AIARE Level 1

Clean driving record

 

Advanced Level Requirements:

All criteria listed for Entry and Intermediate Level, plus:

AIARE Level 2 certification

Technical Rope Rescue certification

 

At the Vail Resorts® family of companies (collectively “Vail Resorts”), we consider safety for employees and guests our number one priority. Ensuring that employees are capable of performing physically demanding jobs is an important factor in our ability to fulfill this commitment. This position is among the most physically demanding at our resorts. Therefore, the position requires successful completion of our Fit to Ride fitness assessment program as a condition of employment. A detailed description of our Fit to Ride program and its requirements are available at: www.vailfittoride.com. Vail Resorts will provide reasonable accommodations whenever necessary to enable otherwise qualified individuals with disabilities to participate in and/or complete the Fit to Ride program, provided reasonable accommodations do not pose an undue hardship on the company.

 

Apply Online: www.jobs.vailresorts.com

Search for Requisition ID: 65572

Contact: personnel@vailresorts.com.

http://www.avalanche.org/employment.php

 

6.)  Crown of the Continent Conservation Specialist, Wilderness Society, Bozeman, MT

http://www.simplyhired.com/job/crown-of-the-continent-conservation-specialist-job/the-wilderness-society/5di3z5xvjb

 

7.)  Communications Manager, The Nature Conservancy, Montpelier, Vermont

https://careers.nature.org/psp/tnccareers/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_CE.GBL?Page=HRS_CE_JOB_DTL&Action=A&JobOpeningId=42395&SiteId=1&PostingSeq=1

 

8.)  CONSERVATION STAFF SPECIALIST II, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, State of Nevada, Ely, NV

https://nvapps.state.nv.us/NEATS/Recruiting/ViewAnnouncement.aep?recruitmentId=22942

 

9.)  PARK NATURALISTS, Long Key State Park, State of Florida, Long Key, FL

http://jobs.myflorida.com/viewjob.html?optlink-view=view-744080

 

10.)  Field Operations Manager – Arizona, National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), Tucson, AZ

http://www.conservationjobboard.com/Job-Listing-Field-Operations-Manager—Arizona-Tucson-Arizona/39363398

 

11.)  NOLS Curriculum Publications Manager, National Outdoor Leadership School, Lander, WY

http://www.nols.edu/alumni/employment/jobdescriptions/curriculum-publications-manager.shtml

 

12.)  Web Graphic Designer, Backcountry, Park City, UT

http://hire.jobvite.com/CompanyJobs/Careers.aspx?c=q7l9Vfwg&page=Job%20Description&j=ouvpZfw7

 

13.)  Public Relations Manager, Tourism Australia, New York, New York

http://jobs.prnewsonline.com/jobseeker/job/20216669

 

14.)  Professional Observer, Northwest Avalanche Center, US Forest Service, Seattle, WA

 

The Northwest Avalanche Center is looking to hire two additional Professional Observers to provide backcountry observations in the Seattle zone and the Mt Hood zone to the NWAC forecast team.

The Professional Observer’s Network provides timely and relevant professional-level observations to the NWAC team, thus reducing the data gaps in NWAC forecast areas. All observations will be focused outside of ski area boundaries in unmitigated terrain.

 

Background

 

Currently, the NWAC forecast team receives routine snow and weather observations from our team of six observers complementing the condition reports from most local ski areas, remote weather stations, NWAC cooperator input, and volunteer observations. The objective of the Professional Observer’s Network is to reduce the NWAC forecasters’ workload while creating more accurate backcountry avalanche forecasts.

 

Responsibilities

 

The primary responsibility of the Professional Observer is to communicate with the NWAC forecast team to analyze snow, provide weather and avalanche observations, and determine current and future trends in avalanche danger. In addition, providing assessment of current avalanche danger compared to posted forecast levels will be a key function of the role.

Each Observer is responsible for two backcountry observations per week. Observation requirements will vary based on the needs of the NWAC forecast team. The NWAC Program Director and the NWAC forecast team will communicate observational needs to the Observer’s Network. Observations may be submitted to the NWAC through email, phone, and/or a mobile phone application. At a minimum, observations must be relevant to pertinent avalanche concerns and submitted on a timely basis. Some examples of the observations that may be recorded are: snow height, taken at many locations throughout a tour; full snow profiles; and various test profiles on multiple aspects and elevations throughout a valley. Observers will be asked to provide photos and/or videos of observations that will be incorporated into the next day’s forecast to help illustrate conditions and concerns to the general public. Observers will also be asked to submit a blog post per week to the new NWAC blog.

 

Required Qualifications

 

All Observers in the Network will, at a minimum, work (or have worked) in the snow industry. This includes ski patrol, highway workers, mountain guides, forecasters, etc. The minimum qualifications are as follows:

– Completion of AIARE or AAA Level 1 and Level 2 avalanche classes

– Exceptional organizational skills

–  The ability to take initiative and work with little daily supervision

– Strong written and verbal skills

– Thorough knowledge of avalanche hazards and a minimum of five years of experience recreating in backcountry avalanche

terrain

–  Excellent fitness and winter backcountry travel skills

–  Previous professional snow and weather data recording experience

–  Ability to write accessible and technically accurate descriptions of snow and avalanche conditions

http://www.nwac.us/media/filer_public/15/78/1578d75c-b2ee-4794-bfa9-2061cd74a75c/proobs_job_announcement_2014-15.pdf

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2014 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

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Your Very Next Step newsletter for August 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for August 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com
“Nature always wears the colors of the spirit.”

– Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu
This edition of “Your very next step” comes to you from Tacoma, Washington.

 

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.
***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:
***  Ned’s upcoming travel

***  25 Natural Phenomena You Have To See To Believe

***  FLIGHT OF THE CONDORS: HAIN WILDERNESS

***  50th Anniversary of The Wilderness Act

***  National Wilderness Conference

***  Wilderness Kitchen — Appetites: Shore lunch puts freshest fish on menu

***  You caught ‘em, now how to cook them? Favorites from the pros

***  Beth Dooley’s “Make Dinner On the Trail” | Star Tribune

***  A day in the desert: Saguaro Wilderness

***  This will get you chirping: Bars made with cricket flour

***  Travel for Free by House-Sitting Your Way Around The World.

***  Birding Skills: October 2015

***  Birdwatching Holidays

***  Hiking 101: Using a Compass

***  15 Essential Tech Gadgets for Travelers

***  From Air Asia: Penang!

***  AMERICA’S 15 BEST ROOFTOP BARS

***  River Recreation in Virginia is Focus of Workshop Sep. 17-18, 2014, in Mecklenburg County

***  20 Nastiest Things People Have Tweeted to Airlines This Month

***  The 2014 Conde Nast Traveler  list of Friendliest and Unfriendliest Cities in the U.S.

***  ICS, IMEC and ITF issue guidance on Ebola virus risks to crews

***  Titanium-Infused Garments, Retro Rain Gear, LED Tents

***  Southeastern Sportsman Expo

***  2015 The Southeastern Wildlife Exposition (SEWE)

***  38th Annual Virginia Fall Forestry and Wildlife Field Tours

***  10 Trips To Take That Will Actually Teach You Something

***  10 BEST WATER PARKS IN THE U.S.

***  Trail of the Month: August 2014

Missouri’s MKT Nature and Fitness Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer Positions, Peak 7 Adventures, Mead, WA

2.)  Volunteer Vacation, Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge, Baring, Maine

3.)  Volunteer Vacation, Crowley’s Ridge State Park, Paragould, Arkansas

4.)  Volunteer Opportunity, Acadia National Park, Wilderness Volunteers, Mount Desert Island, Maine

5.)  Volunteer Opportunity, Rincon Mountain District, Wilderness Volunteers, Saguaro National Park, AZ

6.)  Sierra Club VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Outdoor and adventure-based educators and program administrators, National Center for Outdoor & Adventure Education (NCOAE), Joshua Tree, CA

2.)  Wilderness Instructors (Alaska, Northern California, Oregon, Washington, Colorado, North/South Carolina, and British Columbia), Adventure Treks, Flat Rock, NC

3.)    Urban Wilderness Canoe Guide (Twin Cities Metro Area), Wilderness Inquiry, Minneapolis, MN

4.)  Career Seasonal Fish Hatchery Specialist 1 In-training, State of Washington, Auburn, WA

5.)  Communications Manager (CC5), Shorelands and Environmental Assistance program, Dept. of Ecology, State of Washington, Lacey, Washington

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!
*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel, maybe, perhaps:

 

August 17-20, Tacoma, Wash.

 

August 20 – 23, San Diego, Calif.

 

August 25 – 30, Aarhus/Grenaa/Lystrup/Copenhagen, Denmark

 

September 12-14, Charleston, S.C.

 

September 20-27, Florence, Italy

 

October 27-28, Norfolk, VA

 

October 29-30, Nassau, Bahamas

 

November 24-27, Doha, Qatar

 

December 8-10, Aubu Dhabi, UAE

 

January 27-30    Genoa, Italy

 

***  25 Natural Phenomena You Have To See To Believe

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iyz0QYFq8bc

 

***  FLIGHT OF THE CONDORS: HAIN WILDERNESS

 

Take flight with the majestic condors of Pinnacles National Park! Watch this new video for a birds-eye-view flyover exposing one of California’s most unique wilderness landscapes. Glide through breathtaking spires, rocky mountain ridges, grassy meadows and tumbling waterfalls to experience the awe inspiring power of Hain Wilderness.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=knRwAfxJYBQ&feature=youtu.be

 

***  50th Anniversary of The Wilderness Act

 

September 3, 2014 marks the 50th Anniversary of The Wilderness Act. Please join us in celebrating our National Wilderness Preservation System at national and local 50th Anniversary events throughout the year.

 

http://www.wilderness50th.org/index.php

 

***  National Wilderness Conference

Wednesday, October 15, 2014 – Sunday, October 19, 2014

 

Early registration pricing for the National Wilderness Conference, October 15-19, 2014, in Albuquerque, NM, has been extended until at least September 1 to ensure that agency employees awaiting travel approval, and others, can attend. Register online for only $350 ($175 for seniors/students/seasonals) and secure your spot at the associated events including field trips, pre-conference training, and film gala.

 

https://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1522004

 

***  Wilderness Kitchen — Appetites: Shore lunch puts freshest fish on menu

http://www.mprnews.org/story/2014/06/25/appetites-shore-lunch

 

***  You caught ‘em, now how to cook them? Favorites from the pros

http://www.mprnews.org/story/2014/05/22/walleye-cooking-techniques-from-the-pros

 

***  Beth Dooley’s “Make Dinner On the Trail” | Star Tribune

http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/taste/262737441.html

 

***  A day in the desert: Saguaro Wilderness

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWM0hYyHDvQ

 

***  This will get you chirping: Bars made with cricket flour

 

WHY EAT INSECTS?

Insects are an extremely healthy, delicious, and sustainable form of protein. Humans have evolved eating insects, and even today, 80% of countries around the world have them on the menu in some form.

 

http://chapul.com/

 

***  Travel for Free by House-Sitting Your Way Around The World.

https://www.yahoo.com/travel/travel-for-free-how-to-house-sit-your-way-around-the-94846747042.html

 

***  Birding Skills: October 2015

Tucson Audubon Society

http://www.tucsonaudubon.org/what-we-do/education/eduadult/221.html

 

***  Birdwatching Holidays

 

AMAZON WILDLIFE; ANTARCTICA, THE FALKLANDS AND SOUTH GEORGIA; BRAZIL JAGUARS – THE PANTANAL; BIRDING JAMAICA; CHRISTMAS ISLAND…and more

http://www.wildwings.co.uk/holidays/birdwatching-holidays

 

***  Hiking 101: Using a Compass

http://www.americanhiking.org/resources/how-to-use-a-compass/

 

***  15 Essential Tech Gadgets for Travelers

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/15-essential-tech-gadgets-for-travelers?ref=news_fd_080214

 

***  From Air Asia:

 

Get Your FREE Awesome Penang Travel Guide!

Which island in Malaysia is the by-word for yummy food, renowned for the UNESCO World Heritage-listed George Town, and offers a rich tapestry of nature, culture and much more? Penang, for sure!

From restored shophouses to architectural gems, Penang offers photo-worthy scenes, not to mention the famous street art that will have you snapping away. Just don’t forget to make time for assam laksa, char kuey teow and all of Penang’s yummy treats!

Plan your visit and experience the best that the Pearl of the Orient has to offer:

•             Food, Food, Food!

•             Art, Heritage, Crafts & Cafes

•             Lifestyle & Nature

•             Getting Around

•             Calendar of Events

 

http://edlink.airasia.com/r/Z60WHZU/C9QCY/62TNBV/12NKE1/ADSZV/9M/h?a=391266

 

***  AMERICA’S 15 BEST ROOFTOP BARS

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/americas-15-best-rooftop-bars?ref=news_fd_080214

 

***  River Recreation in Virginia is Focus of Workshop Sep. 17-18, 2014, in Mecklenburg County

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e9g9a8sd80d1b223&llr=bmfhuxcab&showPage=true

 

***  20 Nastiest Things People Have Tweeted to Airlines This Month

https://www.yahoo.com/travel/top-20-nastiest-things-people-c1406909232035.html

 

***  The 2014 Conde Nast Traveler  list of Friendliest and Unfriendliest Cities in the U.S.

http://www.cntraveler.com/daily-traveler/2014/08/friendliest-and-unfriendliest-cities-in-us

 

***  ICS, IMEC and ITF issue guidance on Ebola virus risks to crews

http://maritimeintel.com/ics-imec-and-itf-issue-guidance-on-ebola-virus-risks-to-crews/

 

***  Titanium-Infused Garments, Retro Rain Gear, LED Tents

by Seth Levy

Trailspace

http://www.trailspace.com/blog/2014/08/09/retro-raingear-glowing-tent-and-titanium-infused-garments.html

 

***  Southeastern Sportsman Expo

The first annual Southeastern Sportsman Expo scheduled at the Hampton Convention Center Sept 13-14, 2014′

http://www.southeasternsportsmanexpo.com/about.html

 

***  2015 The Southeastern Wildlife Exposition (SEWE)

February 13-14-15, Charleston, SC

http://sewe.com/about/

 

***  38th Annual Virginia Fall Forestry and Wildlife Field Tours

 

Virginia Cooperative Extension and the Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, in collaboration with Virginia’s natural resource agencies, companies, and associations, will be holding their 38th Annual Fall Forestry and Wildlife Field Tours starting September 29-30, 2014. The tours will promote wise resource management on private forestlands and will focus on science-based forestry and wildlife management practices, public and private sources of technical and financial management assistance, and networking among landowners and natural resource professionals. There will also be demonstration stops on private, industry, and public lands that will center on multiple-use management opportunities and practices. Tours will be held:

 

September 29-30

Chesapeake Bay Fall Forestry & Wildlife Bus and Boat Tour (overnight) Meet in Warsaw For more info, contact Adam Downing adowning@vt.edu  540/948-6881 or Neil Clark, southeast@vt.edu  757/653-2572 http://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu

 

October 10

Halifax County Fall Forestry & Wildlife Field Tour Meet in South Boston For more info, contact Jason Fisher, jasonf@vt.edu, 434/476-2147 http://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu

 

October 30

Grayson-Carroll Counties Fall Forestry & Wildlife Field Tour Meet in Galax For more information, contact Bill Worrell, bworrell@vt.edu  276/889-8056 http://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu

Pre-registration is required, as space is limited on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration is $45/person for the Highland and Charles City County tours, $25/person for the Wise County tour and $30/person for the Prince Edward County tour. This fee covers lunch, refreshments and transportation and is due one week before the tour date. Registration is available online. Come participate in the longest running program of its kind in Virginia! For more information, contact Jennifer Gagnon at jgagnon@vt.edu.

 

***  10 Trips To Take That Will Actually Teach You Something

http://www.buzzfeed.com/statefarm/trips-to-take-that-will-actually-teach-you-something?b=1

 

***  10 BEST WATER PARKS IN THE U.S.

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-best-water-parks-in-the-us

 

***  Trail of the Month: August 2014

Missouri’s MKT Nature and Fitness Trail

By Laura Stark

 

“The trail system provides a way to see the county in an up close and personal way … I love living here because of it. It makes it such a better place to live.”

 

True to its name, within minutes, travelers on the MKT Nature and Fitness Trail are spirited away from lively downtown Columbia, Mo., and taken into the forest. Although the city is so close at hand, it’s forgotten in the company of wild turkeys, deer and a flash of orange as a fox darts across the path. The trail—just a tad shy of nine miles—is serene with the soft crunch of feet on crushed stone, the rustle of leaves overhead and the gentle gurgle of its many creek crossings.

 

“I love the tree canopy,” says Janet Godon, outreach coordinator for the Columbia Parks and Recreation Department, who rides the MKT Trail every day to work. “It could be 100 degrees out, but you get on the trail and you don’t feel it. It’s a backyard gem for the city.”

 

Mike Griggs, director for the Parks and Recreation Department, uses the trail often, too. “When I commute in my car, I get stuck in traffic and I feel frazzled by the time I get to work. When I ride a bike to work, I’ve done something positive to start the day. I feel much better physically and emotionally when I use the trail.”

 

Columbia—affectionately called CoMo by locals—is a college town, home to the University of Missouri, the largest university in the state (famed alumni include Brad Pitt and Sheryl Crow). Before the trail’s dive into nature, it hugs the west end of the campus, and when the fall semester begins, this part of the trail will be transformed with all the vibrancy and activity of its youthful neighbors.

 

MU’s campus is itself a beauty and worth a side trip; its entire grounds are a designated botanical garden. And, only blocks from the trail, the school’s oldest section—the Francis Quadrangle, or more commonly just “The Quad”—is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Its cluster of dusky red brick buildings and an unusual set of towering, roofless columns (the remains of a burnt down building) date back to the late 1800s.

 

In fact, the rail line on which the MKT Trail was built—a spur of the Missouri-Kansas-Texas (MKT) Railroad—was created in part to service students and faculty at MU, a 175-year-old institution and the first public university west of the Mississippi River.

 

A nod to this railroad history is anticipated to be ready next spring. Jay Dix Station, a county-owned but city-managed park that the MKT Trail runs through, is currently under renovation. Plans for the 30-acre site include a train-themed playground and shelter, and a refurbished caboose.

 

But the trail’s southern end is its pièce de résistance. Here, it directly ties into the Katy Trail State Park, one of the longest rail-trails in the country at 238 miles, which nearly traverses the state from border to border. People doing the long haul can conveniently come into town for refreshments or to spend the night. The point where the two trails meet is Hindman Junction, named in honor of a key trail advocate and five-time mayor of Columbia, Darwin Hindman.

 

“The MKT Trail’s connection to the Katy Trail draws people into Columbia that otherwise wouldn’t have seen it,” says Janet Thompson, northern (District II) commissioner for Boone County. “It’s a lovely segue into our community and provides a really great impression of the city. It’s not just an exit ramp.”

 

Incredibly, this trail network could potentially get even better; late last month came the surprising news that a 145-mile segment of inactive rail corridor, which crosses the Katy Trail in Windsor, was going up for bid. Seeing the potential for conversion to a rail-trail, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC) put in an offer to purchase the corridor, but won’t know for a few weeks yet if it will be accepted.

 

In Columbia itself, trails are thriving thanks in part to funding the city received through the federal Nonmotorized Transportation Pilot Program (NTPP). Launched in 2005, the federal government gave four communities across the country, including Columbia, dedicated funding to invest in walking and biking infrastructure and to measure any resulting changes in transportation behaviors. RTC is one of three managing partners and was involved in the program’s design and inception.

 

“We received a $22 million federal grant, of which $6 million was dedicated for trails,” says Griggs. “Trails are still being built with the [NTPP] funding. Some of the money is being used to build spokes off of the MKT Trail. It’s allowing us to build those connections to where people eat, play, work and are entertained.”

 

Locally, the federal program was managed by GetAbout Columbia, and the funding generated more than 125 miles of new on-road bike lanes, multi-use trails, sidewalks and bicycle boulevards in the city, as well as hundreds of new bicycle parking spots.

 

Griggs, who has lived in Columbia all his life, is excited by the new developments. “We’re working on a lot more things to take us to the next level,” he says. “If you’re going to downtown or to the University of Missouri, we have trails that will get you there. Connecting those trails to more shopping centers and neighborhoods—that’s our next step.”

 

The granddaddy of these new paths, the MKT Trail, has been around since 1982. “Columbia is building on investments made previously,” says Marianne Fowler, RTC’s senior strategist for policy advocacy, referring to this longtime showpiece of the community. “Rail-trails have truly forged the movement for active transportation.”

 

Like a piece of a puzzle, the MKT Trail is fitting into a planned 30-mile trail loop around the city. “The loop is our long-range plan; we’re slowly adding segments to it,” says Griggs. “A lot of land is already set aside for it; we just have to find the money to develop it. We’ll probably be able to get it done in the next 10 or 15 years.”

 

Much of the loop, like the portion along the MKT Trail, is already completed. “We think of it as a wheel and it has spokes that come in to central Columbia,” says Godon. “The southern and the northern portions of the loop are built, so we’re filling in the east and west sides.”

 

In 2013, the Show Me State was named “Best Trails State” by the nonprofit American Trails, and with all these exciting trail projects newly completed or underway, it’s certainly showing the country that it has earned it.

 

“The trail system provides a way to see the county in an up close and personal way,” says Thompson, who has walked both the MKT Trail and the Katy Trail with her friends. “I love living here because of it. It makes it such a better place to live.”

 

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/archives/1407.html

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer Positions, Peak 7 Adventures, Mead, WA

 

Along with the positions listed below, here are some other needs that you could fill as a volunteer:

Photography

Video

Office Work

Warehouse

Fundraising events

Driving

Staff Appreciation

 

http://www.peak7.org/about/volunteers.htm

 

2.)  Volunteer Vacation, Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge, Baring, Maine

09/21/2014 – 09/27/2014

https://www.americanhiking.org/events/moosehorn-national-wildlife-refuge-2/

 

3.)  Volunteer Vacation, Crowley’s Ridge State Park, Paragould, Arkansas

11/02/2014 – 11/08/2014

https://www.americanhiking.org/events/crowleys-ridge-state-park/

 

4.)  Volunteer Opportunity, Acadia National Park, Wilderness Volunteers, Mount Desert Island, Maine

 

Sep 28th – Oct 4th 2014  Acadia National Park, ME

 

Acadia National Park is located in Maine on the rock-bound shore of Mount Desert Island. Here you will find granite cliffs side-by-side with sand and cobblestone beaches, and glacier-carved mountains rising from the sea, cupping deep lakes in their valleys. The geography of Acadia National Park ranges from meadows and marshes to dense evergreen forests. Everywhere the ocean makes its presence felt, whether by sight, sound or smell. Additionally, Acadia has over 100 miles of hiking trails and 45 miles of old carriage roads, which can be used for either hiking or mountain biking. Birding is excellent with over 273 species of birds identified on Mount Desert Island and adjacent waters.

 

Our ongoing service project is conducting trail maintenance and construction on a wide variety of park trails; in the highlands of the island or close to the ocean. The park staff will train, supervise and work with us on this task, and there will be a wide variety of jobs for volunteers of all strength and ability levels (no advanced skills are necessary). However a sense of humor and a willingness to get dirty are required.

 

We will camp in a park campground, and hike or make short drives to our work site each day. Acadia has an excellent schedule of evening interpretive programs at their campground amphitheaters and we’re close by the oceanside town of Bar Harbor. Free day activities include hiking, mountain biking, swimming, fishing, sight seeing, and more park interpretive programs. An autumn hawk watch atop Cadillac Mountain is a popular activity as is being there at sunrise to catch the day’s first rays hitting the continental United States.

 

http://www.wildernessvolunteers.org/php/project/Acadia+National+Park/1594301b00da449afef8a44b20a2b225.html

 

5.)  Volunteer Opportunity, Rincon Mountain District, Wilderness Volunteers, Saguaro National Park, AZ

 

Nov 16th – Nov 22nd 2014

The Sonoran Desert is the world’s lushest desert. Saguaro National Park contains one of the most diverse assortments of plants in the entire southwestern United States with more than 900 native species. It is one of the best bird watching spots in the southwestern United States; over 200 species are found here. The area in and around Saguaro National Park offers one of the most spectacular flower displays of any desert area in the country.

 

The Rincon Mountain District of Saguaro National Park ranges from an elevation of 2,670 ft to 8,666 ft and contains six biotic communities. Starting from the lowest elevation, the communities include desert scrub, desert grassland, oak woodland, pine-oak woodland, pine forest and mixed conifer forest. The Rincon Mountains peak at a considerably higher elevation than the Tucson Mountains that make up the western section of the park, therefore there are more biotic communities and increased plant and wildlife diversity. Because of the higher elevation in the Rincons, animals like the black bear, Mexican spotted owl, Arizona mountain king snake, and white-tailed deer live in this district. The Rincons are a region sandwiched between the southern Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Madre Mountains of Mexico, and by the hot Sonoran and cool Chihuahuan deserts — they are a globally unique ecosystem. These bioregional convergences set the stage for an eruption of life; an intermingling of different life forms evolved from vastly different places on the continent, finding themselves tucked together in unusual associations experienced nowhere else. The mountains are very secluded, accessible by foot and horse travel from only a handful of trails.

 

Our service project is conducting trail maintenance on the south flank of the Rincon Mountains on the Manning Camp Trail. We’ll set up a tent and car camp at the closed Madrona Ranger Station at the base of the mountains, and make daily round-trip hikes of up to 6 miles into the wilderness to repair damage from erosion to the trail, cut back overgrown vegetation and generally maintain this trail that provides access to hikers seeking the cool, higher elevations of the Rincons. On our free day, we can hike to a nearby peak to explore the forested highlands and take in vistas of southern Arizona, explore beautiful granite canyons, or relax in camp.

 

http://www.wildernessvolunteers.org/php/project/Saguaro+National+Park/2023255b21c4a48c851ea201ce1a990f.html

 

6.)  Sierra Club VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

 

Connecting people to the outdoors is what we love to do! There are many ways that you can volunteer your time to connect America to beautiful spaces near and far. Whether you are an expert on your local trail system or you want to support your local outdoors group as a webmaster, volunteer coordinator, or fundraiser, the Sierra Club wants you! Read on to find out about the various volunteer opportunities and how to apply.

 

http://content.sierraclub.org/outings/volunteer/opportunities

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Outdoor and adventure-based educators and program administrators, National Center for Outdoor & Adventure Education (NCOAE), Joshua Tree, CA

 

NCOAE is seeking exceptional individuals to add to their growing team of outdoor and adventure-based educators and program administrators!

 

Program in the Spotlight Based minutes from the sandy white beaches of the Atlantic Ocean in North Carolina, the National Center for Outdoor & Adventure Education (NCOAE) is a values-based outdoor adventure and education provider for teens and adults interested in personal growth and professional development. From teen adventures in Alaska, Hawaii, Oregon, Colorado, Montana and Wyoming to adult courses in California and North Carolina, the outdoors is where abilities are transformed and a unique quest for discovery is fostered. NCOAE is looking for individuals who are committed to the educational, emotional and physical development of people on a personal, group and larger societal level. Staff will be experts in leading participants through the rigors of backpacking, climbing, whitewater rafting, surfing and sea kayaking adventures as well as to help them draw valuable life lessons through wilderness curricula and from their own experiences. Summer positions include Lead Instructors, Assistant Wilderness Instructors and Course Directors, with staff training beginning in mid-May. All staff are required to possess a WFR certification, and priority will be given to those who have the experience, skills, certifications and requirements to serve as the whitewater rafting instructor and/or rock climbing instructor. Applications from exceptional outdoor and wilderness-based educators, guides, field staff and program administrators are accepted on a rolling basis. NCOAE.org

 

The National Center for Outdoor & Adventure Education is now accepting applications from experienced Outdoor Educators to help facilitate a private three-day course for 120 seventh and eighth grade students in Joshua Tree National Park (southeastern California) from October 7-9, 2014.

 

One NCOAE staff member is paired with one teacher and ten students. If hired, you will be responsible for facilitating a meaningful and safe outdoor education experience. This includes teaching specific aspects of the NCOAE curriculum (which they’ll train you in), as well as guiding such activities as day and night hikes, team building games and initiatives. You’ll also be responsible for supervising group meals, and for providing continuous guidance to students throughout the course. All student groups will be setting up at a base camp, while a separate kitchen staff will be on hand to facilitate all logistics associated with meals.

 

NCOAE programs expose students to a core curriculum built upon the concepts of Self, Community, Action and Impact. They factor in specific topics during what they call daily Educational Groups (known as “Ed Groups”), and these same topics are revisited for reflection during evening Process Groups (known as “The Summit”). One of your responsibilities will be to teach two to three Ed Groups, which begin with a didactic presentation and end with an experiential activity. As a result, while students are learning the skills needed to adjust to the elements of Joshua Tree, they are also learning the skills needed to improve in the areas of Self, Community, Action and Impact.

 

As a result of this approach, the Joshua Tree course incorporates the very best practices from experiential education — it’s hands-on, student directed, project-based, and interdisciplinary and provides a new and exciting opportunity for the students to apply academic concepts to the real world. They also teach the principles of Leave No Trace.

 

Required Education, Experience and Certifications

• All staff selected must attend a paid two-day training in Joshua Tree from October 5-6, 2014 (each training day starts 8:00 a.m. and lasts until 9:00 p.m.).

• All staff must have a minimum of three years current and continued professional outdoor education experience, preferably with multi-day expeditions.

• A Wilderness First Responder certification is required.

 

Pay Scale

Depending on experience, education & certifications, the rate varies from $100–$140 per day. NCOAE is not able to reimburse for travel, however, they will be providing a full moon for the night of October 8th.

 

Interested?

Please send a resume to hr@ncoae.org with a subject J-Tree 2014.

http://www.backdoorjobs.com/ncoae.html

 

2.)  Wilderness Instructors (Alaska, Northern California, Oregon, Washington, Colorado, North/South Carolina, and British Columbia), Adventure Treks, Flat Rock, NC

 

With programs designed to teach leadership, teamwork, creative problem solving, self-responsibility, confidence building, community living and outdoor skills, Adventure Treks provides unique outdoor experiences for teens, ages 12-18. In the summer months, 16-29 day adventure program destinations include Alaska, Northern California, Oregon, Washington, Colorado, North/South Carolina, and British Columbia; while in the fall, wilderness-based programs are offered for up to a week for school students in the mountains of North Carolina. Doubling as teacher, role model and trip coordinator with five other leaders, Wilderness Instructors manage group dynamics, coordinate trip logistics, maintain outdoor equipment and teach outdoor skills, including backpacking, mountaineering, rock climbing, sailing, whitewater kayaking, cooking and orienteering. Benefits include a competitive salary, travel stipend, room and board while training and working, pro-deal purchases and the opportunity to work during the summer and fall. Applicants must be at least 21 years of age (college graduate preferred), certified in WFR/CPR, have several years experience working with teens and/or leading wilderness programs, solid outdoor skills in a variety of activities and the ability to work long hours with little or no time off. To begin the application process, email your resume to Josh Goldbach. Applications are due by April 30th for summer positions and August 15th for the fall season.

 

If you meet our qualifications, please send a resume to:

 

Adventure Treks Attn: Josh Goldbach

PO Box 1321

Flat Rock, NC 28731

phone: 888-954-5555

fax : 828-698-0339

josh@adventuretreks.com

http://www.adventuretreks.com/about-us/employment.html

 

3.)    Urban Wilderness Canoe Guide (Twin Cities Metro Area), Wilderness Inquiry, Minneapolis, MN

 

Whether by canoe, sea kayak, skis, dog sled, horse pack or backpack, Wilderness Inquiry connects people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities with the natural world while inspiring personal growth. Trail staff are responsible for organizing and leading rigorous single-day events and extended wilderness adventures primarily in North America. Typically, 2-3 staff conduct each trip for 10-14 participants. Over the course of a single trip, leaders may fill the roles of pack horse, teacher, rehabilitation specialist, folksinger, chef, personal-relationship counselor, storyteller, disciplinarian, dishwasher, and bush doctor. Seasonal positions are offered from May through October with potential opportunities for continued work throughout the winter. A 10-day staff training conducted in early June provides skills in canoeing, camp craft, leadership and risk management. Benefits include a per diem stipend from $45 to $110, along with meals while working and staff housing between trips. In addition to having current certification in advanced first aid, water safety and CPR, individuals with previous experience working outdoors and with people with disabilities are desired. Urban Wilderness Canoe Guides and year-round Internships are also available. Details and application materials are available at WildernessInquiry.org.

http://intranet.wildernessinquiry.org/jobinator/jobdesc_detail.php?j=12

 

4.)  Career Seasonal Fish Hatchery Specialist 1 In-training, State of Washington, Auburn, WA

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/washington/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=941591

 

5.)  Communications Manager (CC5), Shorelands and Environmental Assistance program, Dept. of Ecology, State of Washington, Lacey, Washington

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/washington/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=939193

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2014 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for July 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for July 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com
“Rain is grace; rain is the sky descending to the earth; without rain, there would be no life.”

– John Updike

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu
“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.
***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:
***  Ned’s upcoming travel

***  My flight home from Abu Dhabi:

***  United has moved the goal post yet again.

***  How to Effectively Complain to The Hotel’s Front Desk (As Told By a Former Front Desk Agent)

***  Conch:  Let me count the ways…

***  Connecting Stewards with Trails: Meet Libby Wile, American Hiking’s Volunteer Director

***  Volunteer Vacations

***  Boy Scouts of America and American Hiking Society trail stewardship

***  Rail Trail of the Month: June 2014

***  Rail Trail of the Month: July 2014

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Best Outdoor Summer Volunteer Opportunities

2.)  Guide to Volunteering Outdoors in Parks and Wilderness Areas

3.)  Volunteer opportunities, Idaho State Parks

4.)  Fish Hatchery Tour Guides, Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery, Riverdale, ND

5.)  Bird watching tour guide – Fish and Wildlife Service

6.)  Volunteer Map Editor, The National Map Corps, Rolla, MO (Work from anywhere)

7.)  History Tour Guide, Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge, Alamo, TX

9.)  Biology Volunteers, Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, Homer, AK

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Shisha Boy, Marjan Island Resort & Spa, Marjan Island, Ras Al Khaimah, Subai, UAE

2.)  Media Manager, Visit Orlando, Orlando, Florida

3.)  Boat Mate, Marriott, St Thomas, VI

4.)  Stewardess, Nautic Crew International, Inc., Fort Lauderdale, FL

5.)  Canoe Livery Attendant I, City of Ann Arbor,  Ann Arbor, MI

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!
*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel, maybe, perhaps:

 

August 1-3, Auburndale, Mass.

 

August 17-20, Tacoma, Wash.

 

August 20 – 23, San Diego, Calif.

 

September 12-14, Charleston, S.C.

 

September 20-27, Florence, Italy

 

October 27-28, Norfolk, VA

 

October 29-30, Nassau, Bahamas

 

November 24-27, Doha, Qatar

 

December 8-10, Aubu Dhabi, UAE

 

January 27-30    Genoa, Italy

 

***  My flight home from Abu Dhabi:

 

When checking out of the Westin, Caterina asked me if there was anything else she could do to make my stay as pleasant as possible.  I said, “Can you get me an upgrade on my 15-hour, 50-minute flight to Washington.  She immediately got on the phone to Etihad.  Turns out there were no seats available, but, wow, the fact that she even tried is remarkable.  I gave myself plenty of time so I could have a chance to snag one of the up-until-now unavailable exit row seats.  Plus I wanted to have time to enjoy the Etihad lounge and take advantage of my Gold status.  Big surprise, upon check-in the exit row seats were already gone, and since I was not first or business class I was not entitled to use the Terminal three lounge.  If I wanted to avail myself of my Gold privileges I could trek all the way over to terminal one, but, he told me, I needed to going through passport control by 0830 for my 1100 flight.  AUH is a pre-clearance entry, which means after you go through UAE passport control you go through US passport control in the Abu Dhabi airport terminal (not upon entry in the U.S.  I was able to use Global Entry to breeze through, and they even stamped my passport).

 

Personally I am disappointed that I was not able to use the lounge as expected.  This is a pretty important value-for-membership benefit, and to have been told that I was not entitled to use it is more than a disappointment.

 

But all was not lost. When the gate opened for boarding, I happened to be first in line.  For whatever reason, the gate agent crossed out 43K and wrote 8C on my boarding pass and smiled as he told me I had a seat change, and was being upgraded to Pearl business class.  I could have kissed him.

 

Business class is really a full reclining chair in an enclosed area with a place to put your legs up so that you really can sleep.  It’s a shame because my “sleep strategy” for this flight, which was chasing daylight, was to stay awake.  My little area had space to put my stuff, a quilt instead of a flimsy blanket, and a big pillow instead of, well, you know.  I had a power plug and a usb to charge a phone or tablet.  I was offered a beverage before takeoff and was constantly offered food and beverage throughout the flight.  I had the beef tenderloin after take off, and later had the steak sandwich, then scones with strawberries and clotted cream, and still later a chicken salad.  We flew over Iceland, and later Greenland, which is rare to see both.

 

***  United has moved the goal post yet again.  They are following Delta’s frequent flier lead in awarding MileagePlus credit based on dollars spent instead of miles flown.  It has steadily become harder to retain status or use miles for upgrades or free trips.  I think UA is telling me that my loyalty isn’t important to them.  Even though I will have more than enough miles for Gold, I will not even qualify for Silver.  However, the upside is I can plan my travel now without trying to get on a Star Alliance flight, because, I mean, why bother?

 

***  How to Effectively Complain to The Hotel’s Front Desk (As Told By a Former Front Desk Agent)

http://www.hotelchatter.com/story/2014/6/3/125446/3648/hotels/How_to_Effectively_Complain_to_The_Hotel%27s_Front_Desk_%28As_Told_By_a_Former_Front_Desk_Agent%29

 

***  Conch:  Let me count the ways…

 

Like many islands in the Caribbean, conch is a staple of the food scene in Turks & Caicos. Every menu features it, and every local seems pretty fond of it. Provo is even home to the world’s only conch farm, raising the endangered Caribbean Queen Conch for wholesale consumption.

 

Conch appears on menus in a variety of ways, and the toughest part of a trip to Turks and Caicos is avoiding bad jokes (Dude, I’m totally conched out!). Here’s a rundown of how you’ll see conch prepared:

 

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2014/6/2/19536/11309/travel/How+to+Eat+Conch+%28Like+a+Local%29+on+Turks+%26+Caicos+

 

***  Connecting Stewards with Trails: Meet Libby Wile, American Hiking’s Volunteer Director

by Alicia MacLeay

Trailspace Blog

http://www.trailspace.com/blog/2014/06/12/libby-wile-american-hiking-society.html?utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_content=2014-06-18

 

***  Volunteer Vacations

http://www.americanhiking.org/volunteer-vacations/

 

***  Boy Scouts of America and American Hiking Society trail stewardship

 

Here are exclusive opportunities to participate in trail stewardship weeks at two of Boy Scouts of America’s high-adventure bases – Philmont Scout Ranch and Northern Tier.  Jointly organized by American Hiking Society and BSA, these weeks of trail building will provide you with an unforgettable backcountry adventure, pristine hiking, & camaraderie with fellow crew members.

 

CONTACT

 

Phone: Libby Wile at (301)565-6704 ext. 206

Email: LWile@AmericanHiking.org

 

http://www.americanhiking.org/volunteer-vacations/volunteer-philmont-northern-tier/

 

***  Rail Trail of the Month: June 2014

Ohio’s Great Miami River Trail

By Laura Stark

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/archives/1406.html

 

***  Rail Trail of the Month: July 2014

Michigan’s Macomb Orchard Trail

By Laura Stark

 

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/archives/1407.html

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Best Outdoor Summer Volunteer Opportunities

 

The benefits of volunteering are innumerable. Not only does volunteering give you the chance to help others in your community, but it’s also good for your physical and emotional health, particularly if you are enjoying the volunteer work. If you love being outdoors and giving your time to make your city a better place to live, make a difference with these five causes and volunteer opportunities

http://washington.cbslocal.com/top-lists/best-outdoor-summer-volunteer-opportunities/

 

2.)  Guide to Volunteering Outdoors in Parks and Wilderness Areas

 

Love being outside? There are a variety of volunteering opportunities for those who love the outdoors. Most of these opportunities require the volunteer to pay for all travel costs. Some require the volunteer to hike and camp as well. Please read the volunteer requirements of each opportunity carefully before signing up to help.

 

Also check with state parks, and local advocacy groups like the Sierra Club or trail volunteers (like the Maine Appalachian Trail Club), for information about outdoor volunteering in your area, or in an area you plan on visiting.

 

http://www.serviceleader.org/volunteers/parks

 

3.)  Volunteer opportunities, Idaho State Parks

 

Spread your wings in some of the most spectacular places! Choose to volunteer at a park in an old growth forest, along a trout filled stream, or on the shores of a pristine mountain lake. Or, you may want to help us maintain trails, teach boating safety, or work at a visitor center. As part of our team, volunteers provide essential services with a personal touch. You can make visitor experiences more enjoyable and complete. Your volunteer efforts help preserve the natural treasures of Idaho for generations to come.

 

How to volunteer….

 

To volunteer your services and share your knowledge and expertise, please fill out a volunteer application online, or print one out. Selected volunteers will be asked to sign an agreement outlining their responsibilities as well as those of the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation. Keep in mind that not all parks or programs need all the different types of volunteers.

 

What you do as a Volunteer…

 

A person may volunteer as an individual or as a part of a group on short term projects of a day or less, or on a long term project in specialized programs. There are many ways to volunteer your time with Idaho State Parks and Recreation.

 

You are invited to join our Idaho Team!

 

THE BEST JEWELS OF THE GEM STATE are in Idaho State Parks! Fish our world famous trout waters, take in the breathtaking beauty of the Snake River and the Sawtooth Mountains, or be amazed by our gigantic Ponderosa Pines all while volunteering for the best park system anywhere.

 

We are seeking energetic individuals/couples as campground, maintenance, interpretive, and visitor services hosts MARCH- OCTOBER 2014. Full/partial hook-ups provided with a minimum of 30 day, 24 hours/week/person working.

 

Enjoy free entrance/camping, prime host sites, training, and the friendliest staff in the country! Contact: Kathryn.Hampton@idpr.idaho.gov or

 

Idaho State Parks has all of the jewels of the Gem State!

 

THESE PARKS STILL HAVE VACANCIES for 2014:

 

* Land of the Yankee Fork State Park

* Lake Cascade State Park

* Heyburn State Park

* Hells Gate State Park

* Henrys Lake State Park

 

Volunteer Activities

• Campground Host

• Construction/Maintenance

• Computers

• Conservation Education

• Historical Preservation

• Office/Clerical

• Trail/Campground Maintenance

• Tour Guide/Interpretation

• Visitor Information

• Natural Resources Planning

• Fish/Wildlife

• General Assistance

 

APPLY ON-LINE at: http://www.parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/activities/volunteering or

 

call (208) 514-2493 for more information and an application packet NOW.

 

http://www.volunteer.gov/results.cfm?states=ID

 

4.)  Fish Hatchery Tour Guides, Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery, Riverdale, ND

 

Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery is one of the largest U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hatcheries in the nation. We raise a wide variety of fish species from trout and salmon to walleye, pike and the endangered pallid sturgeon. The hatchery is located directly below Lake Sakakawea on the banks of the Missouri River. If you enjoy outdoor recreation, plenty of opportunities exist. Fishing, boating, birding, hiking, camping, hunting…it is all right here!

 

All in all we have a very interesting program here and are in need of assistance. We rely on our volunteers to help conduct tours of the hatchery. Our tour groups range from a few visitors to bus loads of school kids anxious to see the hatchery. In addition we like to involve our volunteers wherever possible with the fish hatchery programs – spawning fish, caring for trout, managing aquariums, mowing lawns, watering flowers, maintaining hiking trails – anything you feel comfortable doing.

 

We try to accommodate the volunteers wishes as much as possible. If you decide to stay with us you will be asked to be available to give tours as scheduled. Group reservations are typically set up in advance so you know when they will be arriving. You can set up your own schedule with the other volunteers to allow you the freedom to enjoy your stay here.

 

There are three camping pads at the hatchery complete with water, sewer and electric hookups. A washer and dryer are located in a trailer house next to the pads for your use. The towns of Riverdale and Pick City are only a couple miles away. We are an hour’s drive from Minot and Bismarck.

 

Check us out on the web at http://www.fws.gov/garrisondam/

 

Fish Production . . . North Dakota Style

 

Early Spring marks the beginning of the cycle of life for many of our native fishes. Northern Pike, a dominant predator species, are the earliest of the many North Dakota fishes to spawn. As the ice begins to recede from the lake’s edge and snowmelt causes increased flows into the river systems, the pike arouse from their period of Winter dormancy and migrate into the flooded shallows to spawn. Frame nets set by fishery biologists capture the adult fish and they are stripped of eggs and milt at the site. The eggs are brought to the Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery where they are incubated in special hatching jars. The newly hatched fry emerge from the eggs in about two weeks. It will be another week before the fry are able to swim or feed. The ‘swim-up’ fry spend the last month of their stay at the hatchery in ponds which have an abundance of zooplankton, the food necessary to provide for the rapid growth of the fish. At the month’s end, the northern pike fry, now called fingerlings, are a couple inches long and ready for stocking into area lakes. If the fingerlings are left in the ponds any longer, the zooplankton will no longer satisfy their hunger, and the fish will begin to eat each other!

 

If you have a taste for the prehistoric, stop by the hatchery in June. The pallid sturgeon, a North Dakota native and an endangered species, are approaching their spawning time. These fish are undoubtably the strangest looking of the North Dakota fish. The fish has a ‘sucker’ type mouth, beady eyes, whiskers (or barbels), and a body covered with ‘scutes’, a scale like structure that gives them the appearance of having a coat of armor. The fish are a long lived fish, probably more than 50 years, reach lengths of six feet and nearly 100 pounds. Both the paddlefish and the sturgeon have changed little since the Carboniferous to early Triassic times. During the reign of the dinosaurs 200 million years ago, their ancestors were the dominant freshwater fish. Jurassic Park is alive and well at the fish hatchery!

 

If you’re in the area, northern pike spawning begins in mid-April, followed by walleye and sauger. Sturgeon are spawned in late June. Coldwater species, trout and salmon, are at the station year-around, however if you visit the station in October, you will be able to witness the annual migration of chinook salmon up the hatchery’s effluent stream and watch as eggs are collected from these awesome fish.

 

A visitor center at the hatchery complete with five 400 gallon aquariums will give you the pleasure of viewing the fishes of North Dakota in their environment. A wetlands hiking trail provides an abundance of opportunities for the photographer or naturalist. Waterfowl, fish and a variety of birds and mammals can be viewed in their natural surroundings year-around. An observation blind provides the perfect opportunity for watching the waterfowl migration. The visitor center is open Labor Day through Memorial Day from 8:00 – 3:30. The hatchery is open year-around. Admission is free. Group tours are available year-around with prior reservations and we are handicapped accessible.

 

The Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery is located in mid-central North Dakota, an hour’s drive north of Bismark on Highway 83. Contact: Rob Holm, Project Leader, Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery Complex, (701) 654-7451.

 

http://www.fws.gov/garrisondam/

http://www.volunteer.gov/results.cfm?ID=13954

 

5.)  Bird watching tour guide – Fish and Wildlife Service

www.fws.gov/deerflat/pdf/llbirdtour.pdf

 

6.)  Volunteer Map Editor, The National Map Corps, Rolla, MO (Work from anywhere)

 

The US Geological Survey (USGS) is recruiting volunteers to collect and update USGS geographic data. Similar to how other online crowdsourcing cartographic applications allow anyone to collect, edit, and use geographic data through an online map editor, the USGS has developed an online editor customized to our data needs that allows volunteers to contribute data to The National Map.

 

We are looking for people like you to work with us to collect data for the USGS. The data you will collect during this project will be loaded into The National Map.

 

If you have access to the Internet and are willing to dedicate some time editing map data we hope you will consider participating!

 

You do not need to live in any particular area to participate. Our editing guidelines explain how you can contribute data from anywhere.

 

http://www.volunteer.gov/results.cfm?ID=13593

 

7.)  History Tour Guide, Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge, Alamo, TX

 

http://www.fws.gov/refuge/Lower_Rio_Grande_Valley/

http://www.volunteer.gov/results.cfm?ID=11280

 

8.)  RESIDENT VOLUNTEERS , U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service national wildlife refuges and national fish hatcheries

 

Resident volunteer housing opportunities are available at many U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service national wildlife refuges and national fish hatcheries. Resident Volunteers provide their own “homes” (some type of recreational vehicle), or they stay in refuge or hatchery housing if available. The field station typically provides such amenities as an RV pad with septic, water and electricity hook-ups. In some cases, there will be a “common area” provided with laundry facilities, Internet access, phones, etc. Government housing may consist of shared spaces such as houses, bunkhouses, cabins, mobile homes, trailers, and even field camps at some Alaska refuges.

 

It is important to note that providing a daily or flat rate allowance, per diem or subsistence pay to volunteers for the intent of covering their expenses is not allowed. Volunteers may be reimbursed for substantiated and actual expenses directly related to their contributed services.

 

Each field station will have a unique set of opportunities and requirements. Most sites require a minimum of 40 hours per week for a couple, and 32 hours a week for a single person living on an RV pad. Some sites may require more or fewer hours. It’s important to make sure both the volunteers and the field station are very clear on the hour-requirements BEFORE the volunteers commit to the site. Guidelines suggest that the number of hours required and the value of the type of work assigned should roughly equal the “going rate” for a camper pad in the local area. For this reason, the requirements will vary widely from place to place.

 

Resident volunteers are encouraged to give more time and energy than the “minimum required.” The more of yourself you invest, the more fulfilling will be your experience. At some locations, the minimum hours might be assigned to a specific job at a specific time in order to keep the basic operations of the refuge or hatchery covered. For example, if sea turtles are hatching, you may have the opportunity to participate in “Turtle Watch” in the evenings, but those hours will not take the place of your assigned duties.

 

Resident volunteers especially enjoy working side-by-side with refuge or hatchery staff and becoming part of the refuge or hatchery family. They have a beautiful place to live for a period of time and are able to explore and experience the refuge or hatchery, as well as the local area. And, in return, the refuge or hatchery gains valuable volunteer assistance.

 

http://www.fws.gov/volunteers/VolResidentOpp.html

 

http://www.fws.gov/volunteers/residentVolPrograms.html

 

9.)  Biology Volunteers, Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, Homer, AK

 

Please send a resume and a cover letter indicating the kind of positions you are interested in and any special skills you have such as bird surveys, isolated field camps and/or skiff and outboard operation, by e-mail alaskamaritime@fws.gov or mail to the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, 95 Sterling Highway # 1, Homer, AK 99603.

 

http://www.fws.gov/refuge/Alaska_Maritime/what_we_do/volunteer.html

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Shisha Boy, Marjan Island Resort & Spa, Marjan Island, Ras Al Khaimah, Subai, UAE

 

As a Shisha Boy you are responsible to provide basic support and service task to the outlet aiming for the highest possible customer satisfaction and your role will include key responsibilities such as:

 

•Ensure that the service to the guest is as per hotel standards in order to maximizeguest satisfaction and departmental profit

•Interact positively and professionally with guest, colleagues and other departments as appropriate and required

•Welcome guests on arrival and help to seat them

•Recommend and suggest specialties to guest and up sell whenever possible

•Take order from guests, put item through micros and follow through service in compliance with hotel standards, clearing and resetting tables once the guests have finished

•Collect supplies from store and ensure all side stations are correctly stocked, tidy and clean

•Report any breakage to Superiors

•Attend all regular departmental briefings and contribute to an open communication within the assigned team

•Be familiar with the company’s internal policies and safety procedures.

 

http://www.catererglobal.com/job/10892473/shisha-boy/

 

2.)  Media Manager, Visit Orlando, Orlando, Florida

http://careers.prweekus.com/jobseeker/job/18606022

 

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

3.)  Boat Mate, Marriott, St Thomas, VI

http://bit.ly/1p1mYSh

 

4.)  Stewardess, Nautic Crew International, Inc., Fort Lauderdale, FL

http://bit.ly/1p1ogg6

 

5.)  Canoe Livery Attendant I, City of Ann Arbor,  Ann Arbor, MI

http://bit.ly/1p1owf8

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2014 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for June 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for June 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com
“Memories are hunting horns whose sound dies on the wind.”

– Guillaume Apollinaire

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu
This edition of Your Very Next Step comes to you from Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

 

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.
***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:
***  Ned’s upcoming travel

***  The Singapore Girls

***  The Dos and Don’ts of Visiting India

***  Test Your Survival Skills

***  Travel Secrets of a Flight Attendant

***  Great photos from Royal Navy photojournalists.

***  35 Most Amazing Places To Travel Before You Die

***  World’s Most Amazing Elevators

***  Travel crossword for June 2014 from International Travel News

***  The British Royal Legion Remembrance Travel

***  10 natural wonders to see before they disappear

***  Casual Float Trip Essentials

***  The Molokini all-transparent two-passenger kayak

***  Festivals of the world: where to go in June

***  Ten months of amazing travel, recorded one second a day at a time (VIDEO)

***  The Complete Guide to Surviving Long-Haul Flights

***  The Great Eastern Trail

***  What is the Finger Lakes Trail System?

***  More Airports Adopt Free Wi-Fi

***  First Atlas of Inuit Arctic Trails Launched

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Carnivore track survey, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, Wisconsin (volunteer opportunities throughout Wisconsin)

2.)  Campground Host Service, Florida Forest Service, Various locations in Florida

3.)  Trail Section Adopter, Finger Lakes Trail, Finger Lakes Trail Conference Service Center, Mt. Morris, NY

4.)  The Cumberland Trail Adopt-a-trail program, The Cumberland Trail Conference, Crossville, Tennessee

5.)  Invasive plant control, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, Wisconsin (opportunities throughout the state)

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
2.)  Communications Director (full-time), Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance,  Jackson Hole, WY

3.)  Outreach and Events Manager, Flint River Watershed Coalition, Flint, Michigan

4.)  Communications Manager, Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties, New York

5.)  Social Media Coordinator, Anaheim/Orange County Visitor & Convention Bureau, Anaheim, California

6.)  Canopy Course Tour Guide, Empower Adventure Operations LLC, Middleburg, VA

7.)  PARK RANGER SPECIALIST (Temporary/Seasonal Position), Oracle State Park, Arizona State Parks, State of Arizona, Oracle, AZ

8.)  Biological Science Technician (Fire Effects Monitor), National Park Service, Sanford, TX

9.)  Disc Jockey, Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd., United States

10.)  Manager, Public Relations – Travel, AAA, Heathrow, Florid

11.)  Senior Program Officer, Private Sector Engagement, World Wildlife Fund, Washington, DC

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!
*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel, maybe, perhaps:

 

 

August 1-3, Auburndale, Mass.

 

August 18-19-22, Tacoma, Wash.

 

August 22, 23, 24, San Diego, Calif.

 

September 12-14, Charleston, S.C.

 

September 19-26, Florence, Italy

 

October  28-29, Nassau, Bahamas

 

***  The Singapore Girls

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/travel/gsingaporegirls/flash.htm

 

***  The Dos and Don’ts of Visiting India

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2014/5/16/16256/1284/travel/Jon+Hamm+Shares+the+Dos+and+Don%27ts+of+Visiting+India+

 

***  Test Your Survival Skills

http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-adventure/outdoor-skills/survival/Test-Your-Survival-Skills.html

 

***  Travel Secrets of a Flight Attendant:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mark-chesnut/rocko-galvez-on-jetsetting_b_5425229.html

 

***  Thanks to Jennifer Wah for turning me on to these great photos from Royal Navy

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014/05/29/24-stunning-images-from-royal-navy-photographers-competition_n_5411844.html?utm_hp_ref=uk

 

***  35 Most Amazing Places To Travel Before You Die

http://dailynewsdig.com/travel/

 

***  World’s Most Amazing Elevators

http://abcnews.go.com/Travel/photos/photos-worlds-amazing-elevators-11569212/image-11649406

 

***  Travel crossword for June 2014 from International Travel News

http://www.intltravelnews.com/2014/06/travel-crossword-june-2014

 

***  The British Royal Legion Remembrance Travel

http://www.remembrancetravel.org.uk/news/anniversaries

 

***  10 natural wonders to see before they disappear

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/42723289/ns/travel-destination_travel/

 

***  Casual Float Trip Essentials

From the coolest kayak we’ve ever seen to a super grippy water shoe, this is the gear you need for those quiet days on the river.

By: Michael Malone

http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-gear/gear-shed/pro-shop/Casual-Float-Essentials.html

 

***  The Molokini is an all-transparent two-passenger kayak made out of the same durable polycarbonate material used in the production of bulletproof glass and fighter jet canopies

http://clearbluehawaii.com/

 

***  Festivals of the world: where to go in June

From Lonely Planet

This is an excerpt from Lonely Planet’s A Year of Festivals.

Read more: http://www.lonelyplanet.com/travel-tips-and-articles/77205#ixzz33FkujlAc

 

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/travel-tips-and-articles/77205#ixzz33Fjt7or6

 

***  Ten months of amazing travel, recorded one second a day at a time (VIDEO)

http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2013/11/12/ten-months-of-amazing-travel-recorded-one-second-at-a-time-video

 

***  The Complete Guide to Surviving Long-Haul Flights

Qantas and Emirates airlines have some of the longest routes in the world. Here’s how to stay sane during hour 13 of your journey.

By ANNA CODREA-RADO

http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2013/03/the-complete-guide-to-surviving-long-haul-flights/274456/

 

***  The Great Eastern Trail:

 

A project of the Great Eastern Trail Association, working with American Hiking Society and local trail partners, to create America’s newest long distance trail for hikers from Alabama to New York!

 

The Great Eastern Trail (GET) provides a premier hiking experience on a series of existing trails that are being linked to each other into a long-distance footpath in the Appalachian Mountains stretching from Alabama to the Finger Lakes Trail in New York.

 

http://greateasterntrail.net/about_us.html

 

***  What is the Finger Lakes Trail System?

 

The Finger Lakes Trail System includes the main Finger Lakes Trail (FLT) from the Pennsylvania-New York border in Allegany State Park to the Long Path in the Catskill Forest Preserve. The main FLT is 558 miles long. There are six branch trails and 29 loop trails and spur trails that extend from the main FLT. These branch, loop and spur trails currently total 400 miles. Including the Main Trail and all branch, loop, and side trails, the Finger Lakes Trail System offers 958 miles of hiking.

 

The Trail System has been and continues to be built and maintained by 15 organizational and approximately 60 individual and family trail sponsors.  (See volunteer adopt-a-trail opportunities below.)

 

http://www.fltconference.org/trail/go-hiking/about-trail/

 

***  From Bernie Wagenblast’s Transportation Communications Newsletter:

 

***  More Airports Adopt Free Wi-Fi

The New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/10/business/more-airports-adopt-free-wi-fi.html

 

***  First Atlas of Inuit Arctic Trails Launched

Link to article from the University of Cambridge:

http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/first-atlas-of-inuit-arctic-trails-launched

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Carnivore track survey, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, Wisconsin (volunteer opportunities throughout Wisconsin)

 

Become a tracker!

 

Help Wisconsin track and survey (or determine the existence of) wolves, Canada lynx, cougar, wolverine, fisher, bobcat.

 

Because carnivores are often secretive and occupy very large home ranges, it is difficult to monitor them by direct observation. However, we can still estimate the abundance and distribution of carnivores by observing the number and location of their tracks. Volunteers have been conducting snow track surveys for wolves and other carnivores since 1995. To participate, trackers are expected to attend a wolf ecology course, attend a track training course, take a mammal track test and agree to complete three surveys following DNR guidelines

 

Learn tracking skills and assist in wildlife surveys

 

Researchers from the Department of Natural Resources have conducted track surveys of fur-bearing mammals since 1977. In 1979, the DNR began conducting formal wolf track surveys as part of the state wolf monitoring program. A separate survey program for American marten began in 1981. Snow track surveys have also been used to determine distribution and abundance of fisher, bobcat and other forest carnivores in Wisconsin. Since 1995, the Wisconsin DNR has used volunteers to conduct snow track surveys for wolves and other carnivores.

 

The goals of the survey are to:

 

  • determine the number, distribution, breeding status and territories of wolves in Wisconsin;
  • develop a sense of the abundance and distribution of other medium-sized and large carnivores in the state; and
  • determine the existence of rare carnivores such as Canada lynx, cougar and possibly wolverine.

 

Become a tracker!

 

Help monitor Wisconsin’s wolf population by conducting winter track surveys

 

To participate, you will be expected to:

  • attend a wolf ecology course sponsored by DNR, Timber Wolf Alliance or Timber Wolf Information Network;
  • attend a track training course sponsored by the WI DNR;
  • take a mammal track test; and
  • agree to complete three surveys following DNR guidelines [PDF] and submit their findings.

Data received from this program is used to supplement DNR surveys and provide the public with opportunity to be involved in determining the status of our forest carnivores.

Carnivore tracker forms

 

Forms are available as online forms or PDF

 

http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/wildlifehabitat/volunteer.html

 

2.)  Campground Host Service, Florida Forest Service, Various locations in Florida

 

Campground Hosts stay on-site at one of the Florida Forest Service recreation areas and assist managing the campground. Hosts answer camper’s questions, give directions, pass out literature, help with light maintenance and make themselves available for late-night emergencies. In return, campground hosts get a free campsite for the time they volunteer and the satisfaction of knowing they are helping folks fully enjoy their forest experience. For more information on how to volunteer as a campground host, please contact Blackwater Forestry Center, Withlacoochee Forestry Center, Lake Talquin State Forest, or Tate’s Hell State Forest.

http://www.freshfromflorida.com/Divisions-Offices/Florida-Forest-Service/For-Communities/Programs/Volunteer-Opportunities#host

 

3.)  Trail Section Adopter, Finger Lakes Trail, Finger Lakes Trail Conference Service Center, Mt. Morris, NY

 

As a trail section adopter you assume responsibility for a section of the Finger Lakes Trail, generally 1 or 2 miles in length. Working for your club or trail sponsoring organization, or as an individual trail sponsor under one of the FLTC’s volunteer Regional Trail Coordinators, you agree to visit your section three times per year. You perform routine inspection and maintenance: clear vegetation and fallen branches, pickup litter, refresh blazes and signs as needed, check up on trail infrastructure such as register boxes, benches, bridges, lean-tos, etc.

 

To access the services of a roving certified chainsaw operator or for anything else you can’t handle yourself, you will contact your club or organization’s trails chairperson, or the FLTC’s Regional Trail Coordinator who oversees your area. They will help you organize a work day with a local work crew.

 

You will keep a log of your activities and report total hours of trail work, drive time, and administrative work, and report it to your trails chairperson or sponsor.

 

You will also be invited to attend occasional training meetings in your region.

http://www.fltconference.org/trail/members1/volunteer-trail-workers/trail-section-adopter/

 

4.)  The Cumberland Trail Adopt-a-trail program, The Cumberland Trail Conference, Crossville, Tennessee

 

Adoptees are individuals or organizations who have committed

to assist in the maintenance of a particular portion of the Cumberland Trail.

http://cumberlandtrail.org/website/get-involved/adopt-a-trailsegment/

 

5.)  Invasive plant control, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, Wisconsin (opportunities throughout the state)

 

Invasive plants, animals and pests are taking a toll on Wisconsin’s lakes, rivers and landscapes. The DNR is working with citizens and partners to slow the spread of invasive species. Through educational outreach, strategic planning and active management we are protecting our environment and economy from invasives.

http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/Invasives/?utm_source=Banner&utm_medium=Homepage&utm_campaign=20140601_ISAM

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Manager, Public Relations – Travel, AAA, Heathrow, Florida

http://www.jobtarget.com/c/job.cfm?job=18438222

 

***  From Heather Murphy:

 

Good afternoon, Ned,

 

Here is a submission that might be apropos for YVNS and JOTW.  The Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance is seeking a full-time Communications Director.  The deadline for applications is June 20, 2014.

 

Hope all is well with you and your travels,

Heather

 

2.)  Communications Director (full-time), Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance,  Jackson Hole, WY

http://jhalliance.org/About/Jobs/201405-Comm_Director-Position.pdf.

 

3.)  Outreach and Events Manager, Flint River Watershed Coalition, Flint, Michigan

http://philanthropynewsdigest.org/jobs/9429-outreach-and-events-manager

 

4.)  Communications Manager, Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties, New York

http://philanthropynewsdigest.org/jobs/9427-communications-manager

 

5.)  Social Media Coordinator, Anaheim/Orange County Visitor & Convention Bureau, Anaheim, California

http://jobs.prsa.org/jobseeker/job/18515602/

 

6.)  Canopy Course Tour Guide, Empower Adventure Operations LLC, Middleburg, VA

 

EMPOWER Leadership Sports and Adventure Center

 

Job Title: Seasonal Adventure/Zip Line Canopy Tour Guide

 

EMPOWER Mission: EMPOWER Leadership Sports & Adventure Center is committed to delivering extraordinary customer experiences that promote self and team development. By creating a unique and stimulating environment, we provide the opportunity for individuals and groups to embark on a one of a kind adventure that will enhance their mental and physical fortitude. Coupled with the towering experimental learning elements, our curriculum-based programming will help people better manage the way they communicate and interact with others in team situations. EMPOWER Leadership Sports & Adventure Center will help equip individuals with the life skills necessary to transform the way people interact at work, school, home and in all walks of life.

 

Job Qualifications:

 

– Contribute to a positive, supportive team atmosphere and model a “can do” attitude

– Responsible, reliable, punctual and committed to job

– Family friendly, pleasant and courteous in all interactions with guests

– Able to make risk management decisions

– In alignment with EMPOWER mission

– Communicates well with co-workers and managers

– Safe and responsible use of all EMPOWER gear and equipment; including but not limited to:

o Zip line canopy tour gear (i.e. harnesses, carabiners, trolleys, tethers, helmets)

o Rescue equipment (i.e. static ropes, carabiners, figure 8 friction devices, throw bags)

o Tree climb equipment (i.e. dynamic climbing ropes, carabiners, ATC belay devices, harnesses, helmets)

o Four wheel all-terrain vehicle

o Grounds equipment (i.e. lawnmower, shovels, pole saw, chain saw)

– Experience working in varied weather conditions

– Experience working with diverse clientele

– Flexible Schedule

– Must successfully complete EMPOWER training; to include various physical and written examinations and evaluations

– Must be committed to work entire season (April through November)

– Participate in regular staff development workshops and meetings and maintain proficiency in all technical skills

– Ability to walk, stand, and/or hang in a harness for long periods of time

– Able to lift and carry 50lbs. of weight and hike 3 miles per day

– Able to handle demanding work schedule with long work weeks in a multi-task environment

– Strong self-care skills

– Drug Free

 

 

Job Descriptions/Responsibilities:

 

– The Seasonal Adventure Guide is an “at will” position and works under the General Manager. The responsibilities include but are not limited to:

o Arriving ready to work for scheduled guide responsibilities as assigned on the EMPOWER staff schedule

o Meet and great EMPOWER guests and assist in customer registration and payment

o Maintain a professional sense of humor and a cooperative attitude in dealing with all EMPOWER guests. Treat guests in a manner that makes them feel respected, valued, and cared for

o Inspection of zip line canopy tour equipment prior to each use; including appropriate completion of evaluation form

o Leading pre-trip briefing and equipment outfitting for EMPOWER adventure activities

o Acting as sending and/or receiving guide for zip line canopy tours

o Management of risky behavior and maintaining control of the tour group at all times

o Responsible for personal safety and safety of others

o Use and protection of digital camera in various adventure situations

o Break down and appropriate storage of zip line canopy tour equipment after use

o Set up and break down of zip line canopy tour course

o Assisting in maintenance of grounds/property related to check in area, equipment shed, and trails/forest

o General customer services

 

Interested parties should send resume, cover letter, and 3 references to Dan Jaskot, General Manager EMPOWER Leadership Sports & Adventure Center (dan@leadershipsports.com or Dan Jaskot, 2011 South Main Street, Middletown, CT 06457). Feel free to contact the EMPOWER office (860-638-4754) with any questions regarding potential employment.

http://www.indeed.com/cmp/Empower-Adventure-Operations-LLC/jobs/Canopy-Course-Tour-Guide-35740d7613ce8e47

 

7.)  PARK RANGER SPECIALIST (Temporary/Seasonal Position), Oracle State Park, Arizona State Parks, State of Arizona, Oracle, AZ

http://bit.ly/Us9jdS

 

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

8.)  Biological Science Technician (Fire Effects Monitor), National Park Service, Sanford, TX

http://1.usa.gov/1myZGBJ

 

9.)  Disc Jockey, Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd., United States

http://bit.ly/1myZjXY

 

10.)  Manager, Public Relations – Travel, AAA, Heathrow, Florid

http://www.jobtarget.com/c/job.cfm?job=18438222

 

11.)  Senior Program Officer, Private Sector Engagement, World Wildlife Fund, Washington, DC

 

World Wildlife Fund (WWF), the world’s leading conservation organization, seeks a Senior Program Officer (SPO), to support the Private Sector Engagement (PSE) unit. The SPO will lead, manage, and coordinate communications with select corporate partners including WWF’s global partnership with The Coca-Cola Company (TCCC). This includes developing a strategic approach, identifying key areas for collaboration, working closely with the company and its representatives to develop mutual objectives and project manage the shared work plan. The SPO serves as a key bridge between Program areas and PSE, while working closely with program leadership at WWF-US and the broader WWF international network to position and grow WWF’s work.

 

Major Duties & Responsibilities

 

•             Leads the TCCC-WWF partnership communications work stream, helping to establish the partnership as a global model for environmental sustainability and cross-sector collaboration. This includes: programmatic execution, such as developing the communications work plan, supervision of material development, and stakeholder outreach; preparing briefing materials; message development; website materials; and public speaking at a variety of internal and external events. Develops and manages crisis communications plans and outreach as needed.

 

•             In cooperation with PSE staff and the Marketing/Communications team at WWF-US and throughout the WWF Network, develops the foundation for communication strategies to guide the roll-out of locally relevant communications tactics. These strategies may include communications goals, audiences, messengers, key messages and challenges/ opportunities associated with reaching goals. Anticipates communication conflicts, as well as risks to our reputation and brand, that may arise through our engagements with external stakeholders. Mitigates these risks by coordinating with key audiences, providing a proven step-wise approach to problem solving.

 

•             Engages with agencies and research organizations, partner organizations and consultants as necessary. Maintains regular contact with representatives from peer organizations, WWF offices and professional networks.

•             Manages the Communications work stream partnership budget by working with Manager, PSE and Program Administration.

Supports the PSE team as time allows and as is appropriate in efforts such as general capacity building and tools and materials development.

 

Minimum Requirements

 

Education/Experience:

 

A Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in business, journalism, communications, environmental studies or a related degree is required. A working knowledge of general business and sustainable business practices is preferred. Minimum of five years private sector, agency or non-profit experience is required. Experience with mission-oriented, strategic communications or brand marketing, and success as a creative and effective communicator are essential.

 

Skills and Abilities

 

Proven success in conceptualizing, developing, implementing and managing communication strategies that support an entity’s goals, using creative and strategic thinking.

 

•             Strong project and relationship management skills and demonstrated ability to work as part of a high-level, multi-dimensional, international team.

 

•             Tech savvy, with experience in producing communication materials for a variety of channels, including digital and multimedia.

•             Exceptional interpersonal and communication skills (verbal and written) that can be used internally and externally to persuade others towards an idea or goal.

 

•             Ability to effectively prioritize and work skillfully under time constraints

 

•             Involvement with budgetary oversight is a plus.

 

•             Must be willing to travel up to 25% both nationally and internationally

 

•             Knowledge of other languages is an advantage

 

To Apply:

 

Please visit our careers page and submit an online application.

 

Submit cover letter and resume to http://worldwildlife.org/about/careers/jobs, job #14049

The most compatible browser that supports the application process is Internet Explorer 7, or version 8 and 9 in “compatibility mode”

Due to the high volume of applications we are not able to respond to inquiries via phone

As an EOE/AA employer, WWF will not discriminate in its employment practices due to an applicant’s race, color, religion, sex, national origin, and veteran or disability status.

 

http://worldwildlife.org/about/careers/jobs

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2014 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for May 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for May 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Memories are hunting horns whose sound dies on the wind.”

– Guillaume Apollinaire

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

 

This issue of YVNS comes to you from Denver International Airport.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Ned’s upcoming travel

***  10 Mouth-Watering Culinary Tours Around the World

***  Washington Monument reopens after repairs

***  Anacostia Watershed Society

***  Freedom to Float

***  Anacostia Paddle Night

***  America’s 10 Best State Parks

***  PLANET EXPLORE

***  Reviewer Bill “Laughing Dog” Garlinghouse Wins Old Town Kayak Package

***   Here’s Bill’s winning review:

***  Hammock Camping 101

***  The Ultimate Hang

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: May 2014

Wisconsin’s Shoreland 400 Rail Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer & Stewardship, Anacostia Watershed Society, Bladensburg, MD

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Social Media Manager, The North Face, Alameda, CA

2.)  Sports Marketing Coordinator, The North Face, Alameda, CA

3.)  Deputy Vice President of Communications, National Parks Conservation Association, Washington, DC

4.)  Media Relations Summer Intern, National Parks Conservation Association, Washington, DC

5.)  Fish Hatchery Superintendent, State of Wyoming, Dubois, WY

6.)  Fisheries Technician 1- Tagging Trailer Assistant, Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Lewiston, ID

7.)  Coho Fisheries Monitoring Intern, Turtle Island Restoration Network, Olema, CA

8.)  Bicycle Technician, Marriott Vacations Worldwide, Hilton Head Island, SC

9.)  Field Bike Technician – Bay Area Bike Share, Alta, San Francisco, CA

10.)  Party Bike Tour Driver, The Thirsty Pedaler, Louisville, KY

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!
*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel, maybe, perhaps:

 

May 11-16, Seattle / Bellingham / Bremerton

 

June 9-10, Abu Dhabi, UAE

 

June 11-12, Bahrain

 

August 18-19-22, Tacoma, Wash.

 

August 22, 23, 24, San Diego, Calif.

 

October 28-29, Nassau, Bahamas

 

***  10 Mouth-Watering Culinary Tours Around the World

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-mouth-watering-culinary-tours-around-the-world?obref=obinsite#!1-intro

 

***  Washington Monument reopens after repairs

Steve Hendrix

Washington Post

Visitors can go inside the obelisk for the first time since it was damaged by an earthquake nearly 3 years ago.

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/washington-monument-attracts-line-of-eager-visitors-as-it-reopens-after-repairs/2014/05/12/1f71658e-d9d0-11e3-8009-71de85b9c527_story.html?wpisrc=nl_buzz

 

***  Anacostia Watershed Society

 

The mission of the Anacostia Watershed Society is to protect and restore the Anacostia River and its watershed communities by cleaning the water, recovering the shores, and honoring the heritage. The vision is to make the Anacostia River and its tributaries swimmable and fishable, in keeping with the Clean Water Act, for the health and enjoyment of everyone in the community.

 

http://www.anacostiaws.org/

 

***  Freedom to Float

 

The Chesapeake Bay watershed has a storied history and great natural beauty, but it can be difficult to explore because of limited shoreline access. A new coalition is working to help more people enjoy these remarkable waters.

 

http://www.npca.org/protecting-our-parks/air-land-water/great-waters/freedomtofloat/

 

***  Anacostia Paddle Night

 

Friday, June 6: Join NPCA and Anacostia Watershed Society for a free night of paddling along the Anacostia River. We’ll launch from the Ballpark Boathouse and explore the new Anacostia Water Trail. Learn more about Anacostia Paddle Nights and  register online at: anacostiaws.org/calendar.

 

***  America’s 10 Best State Parks

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/americas-10-best-state-parks?ref=news_fd_042614

 

***  PLANET EXPLORE

 

PlanetExplore is an on-line community designed to help individuals and families learn about and participate in outdoor activities and events in their area.  Powered by partner organizations that share our passion, PlanetExplore is a portal to the outdoors designed to inspire and enable people of all ages to become regularly active outside, and to develop the benefits gained through a connection to nature.

 

We have teamed up with a host of like-minded partners to deliver a calendar brimming with local events for you and your family to become involved.  Using PlanetExplore, you can find local outdoor events, become a PlanetExplore member to receive updates based on your interests, explore local parks and outdoor spaces using our Urban Nature Guides, and be inspired by our partner and visionaries blogs, videos and podcasts.

 

We at The North Face® love the outdoors.  It’s in our DNA, and it defines us as a company.  That passion and our desire to share this is the catalyst behind PlanetExplore.  Our collective goal is to inspire the next generation of enthusiasts and increase outdoor participation among people of all ages.

 

Join us at PlanetExplore to get connected, get involved, and get outdoors! This is your first step to define for yourself what it means to Never Stop Exploring™.

 

http://www.thenorthface.com/en_US/our-story/planetexplore/

www.planetexplore.com

 

***  Reviewer Bill “Laughing Dog” Garlinghouse Wins Old Town Kayak Package

http://www.trailspace.com/blog/2014/04/30/old-town-camden-kayak-review-winner.html

 

***   Here’s Bill’s winning review:

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/hennessy-hammock/ultralight-backpacker-asym/?review=31033

 

***  Hammock Camping 101

http://outdoors.campmor.com/hammock-camping-101/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=TrailMail-April62014#fbid=oXfSSwT2klY

 

***  The Ultimate Hang

Hammock camping tips, reviews and illustrations

http://theultimatehang.com

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

 

Trail of the Month: May 2014

Wisconsin’s Shoreland 400 Rail Trail

By Laura Stark

 

“At all levels of government—local, county, state and federal—everybody was really interested in this project.”

 

Sheboygan County is rural, small-town America—no doubt about it. This is Wisconsin dairyland, situated halfway between Milwaukee and Green Bay, where the county seat is the Bratwurst Capital of the World. It’s not the type of place that one would expect a thriving walking and biking culture, which made it the perfect candidate for a grand, national experiment that began in 2005. And in Sheboygan, the county’s largest city, the Shoreland 400 Rail Trail was a little trail designed to have a big impact on changing modes and minds on transportation.

 

“We’re not like larger cities,” says Chad Pelishek, the City of Sheboygan’s director of planning and development. “We don’t have traffic jams or difficulty finding parking. Walking to downtown is something new because it’s so easy for us to get in our cars and go.”

 

The Nonmotorized Transportation Pilot Program (NTPP) has a long name but a simple premise: What happens to a community when people-powered transportation is made a priority? To find out, the federal government gave four communities across the country, including Sheboygan County, $25 million to invest in walking and biking infrastructure. A report detailing the results of the NTPP is expected to arrive by the end of this month.

 

“Sheboygan County is 500 square miles in size, so our municipalities are fairly spread out,” says Emily Vetting, associate planner for Sheboygan County’s planning and conservation department. “Because it’s so spread out, there are a lot of barriers to biking and walking, so we directed the focus of the NTPP in Sheboygan County on short trips within those communities that could be made by biking and walking.”

 

The Shoreland 400 Rail Trail is short—less than two miles—but according to the county’s website, within one mile of the corridor lies approximately 31 percent of the county’s population, 10 of the 16 Sheboygan public schools, 53 churches and approximately 80 manufacturing/production employers.

 

Not only does the trail thus provide a prime opportunity for walking and biking to work and school, less than a mile away lies the grand jewel of the city, sparkling Lake Michigan. Perhaps surprisingly, blue-collar Sheboygan—where nearly half the jobs are in the manufacturing sector—is known as the “Malibu of the Midwest” for its exceptional freshwater surfing. With the rail-trail so close to the shoreline, the city’s well-loved beaches are only a short stroll or ride away. Topping it off, less than three miles in the other direction, a connection can be made to the Old Plank Road Trail, which offers a 17-mile journey west through tranquil countryside.

 

This is quite a comeback story for what was once an eyesore for the city. “The rail corridor was a blighted area,” says Pelishek. “People were dumping junk there, and it was overgrown with brush. It’s really a night-and-day difference with what it looks like now.”

 

And it will just keep getting better. A new landscaping plan will add greenery all along the trail’s winding black path. “We really dreamed big with it,” says Vetting. “We’re aware that logistically we may not be able to fund everything at once, so we’ll do it in phases.” This summer will see the completion of the plan’s first phase, and future phases will roll out as funds become available.

 

“The chosen plants will tie into the neighborhood’s identity,” says Vetting. “For example, there’s a bar along the trail that brews its own beer, so hops will be planted there, and next to an Asian food market there will be trees native to that area that are also sustainable in a Midwestern climate. An area near a pizzeria will get shrubs and flowers with Italian feeling.”

 

Says Vetting, “Once you have these landscaping facets in place, it helps to ensure the trail’s longevity. People take ownership of it. Success is more guaranteed when neighborhoods take pride in it.”

 

Although rail-trails have been around since the 1960s, including Wisconsin’s famed Elroy-Sparta State Trail, this was the city’s first, and the NTPP funding was essential to it being built. Vetting estimates that about $1.3 million for the trail came from the program. The first shovel was turned at the trail’s groundbreaking ceremony last summer, attended by Congressman Tom Petri (R-WI), who campaigned the NTPP through Congress, and Marianne Fowler, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy’s senior vice present of federal policy.

 

“At all levels of government—local, county, state and federal—everybody was really interested in this project,” Fowler recalls. “There was more public engagement in Sheboygan than in any of the other pilot program communities.”

 

By the fall of 2013, the trail was complete, but being that Wisconsin was itself on the cusp of winter, the trail’s usage is just getting off the ground this spring. In fact, the trail’s official dedication will take place this coming June 2.

 

“The trail opened in the fall, and just a day or two after it was finished, it snowed,” says Bob Esler, a retired high school teacher who has lived in Sheboygan since 1967.

 

Esler, a railroad buff, was so enthused about the project that he wrote a small book—160 pages—on the area’s railroad history and designed historical signage that will be placed along the trail this summer. The trail will also sport a new logo he designed, inspired by the logo of the Chicago and North Western Railway, which once utilized the rail bed. The trail’s name itself comes from the bright yellow trains that once whistled down the tracks from Chicago to Minneapolis, a trip that was 400 miles and took 400 minutes.

 

“The 400 was a streamliner,” says Esler. “Its first car was a tavern lunch-counter car with a soda fountain and a short order cook. They used them from 1942 to 1971 when the trains stopped running.”

 

Esler himself was once a passenger. “As a kid, I grew up in Milwaukee, so when I went to college in Chicago, I rode the 400 to visit home,” says Esler. “It was a nice way to go. I’d sit in the parlor car and, after I turned 21, I’d get a drink!”

When RTC spoke to Esler last week, the weather had finally taken a turn for the better. It was 70 degrees after a long, cold winter, and he was airing up his tires for his first ride down the rail-trail. Perhaps an echo of the community’s sentiment, he enthusiastically exclaimed, “I haven’t been on the trail yet, but I plan to go on it soon!”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer & Stewardship, Anacostia Watershed Society, Bladensburg, MD

 

If you are looking for a good cause that deserves your time and effort, look no further! Here at AWS no contribution is more valuable to us than your hard work. We offers a variety of volunteer opportunities that will engage your hands, your head, and your heart in the protection and restoration of our local lands and water. Volunteers are accommodated individually and in groups.

 

Volunteer Outdoors!

 

Interested in hands-on environmental restoration work? Help us with one of these outdoor stewardship projects—

• River & Community Trash Cleanups

• Non-native, Invasive Plant Removals

• Native Plant Restoration

• Meadow Restoration

 

Regularly scheduled volunteer events are listed on our event calendar at http://www.anacostiaws.org/calendar.

 

Please see the calendar for complete event details and participation instructions. Other types of activities, including native wetland plantings, may be available from time to time. AWS will arrange special projects for organized groups of volunteers. Please see A Note About Volunteer Groups below for more information.

 

Attention Students! Community service hours are available when you volunteer with AWS! Ask us for details, or bring your community service form with you.

 

Photographers and Videographers are also needed to document our restoration work along with capturing the beauty of the wildlife and the river. Contact our Communications Manager at 301-699-6204 x117 or email info@anacostiaws.org.

 

A Note About Volunteer Groups

 

Does your business, organization, church, or school want to volunteer with AWS? Volunteering in a group is simple and easy. All you have to do is contact an AWS volunteer project coordinator to make arrangements. We will match the size and capacity of your group to a fun and rewarding volunteer activity that everyone will enjoy! Visit the links under

 

Stewardship Projects above for descriptions of all our volunteer activities.

 

AWS tries to accommodate all special requests for group volunteer events. Dates and times for special group projects depend upon availability of AWS staff and project resources. All volunteer events are subject to rescheduling or cancellation in the event of severe weather or emergencies.

 

AWS volunteer projects are funded, in part, through government grants. In compliance with the terms of those grant awards, AWS maintains the right to invite members of the general public to participate in all volunteer events, scheduled or arranged independently.

 

Anacostia Watershed Society

 

The George Washington House, 4302 Baltimore Avenue, Bladensburg, MD 20710

phone: 301-699-6204  fax: 301-699-3317

 

http://www.anacostiaws.org/get-involved/volunteer-stewardship

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Social Media Manager, The North Face, Alameda, CA

 

At The North Face, we push the boundaries of innovation with our product design and development of premier apparel, equipment and footwear to enable and inspire athletes and enthusiasts to Never Stop Exploring. We remain deeply proud to

 

be the first choice of the world’s most accomplished climbers, mountaineers, extreme skiers, snowboarders, endurance runners, and explorers. If you have a passion for the outdoors and enjoy a fast-paced environment, this is the place for you!

 

The key responsibility of the Social Media Manager is to manager all TNF social media efforts across Facebook, You Tube, Twitter, activity-specific social media sites, and other emerging media to deliver key brand messaging and content.

 

Leverage end-to-end creative, copy, and sports marketing content across relevant sites to drive awareness, tnf.com database growth, and traffic for tnf.com. The Social Media Manager will be the internal champion and evangelist for social media across the organization. Establish control-related standards and procedures.

 

Qualifications

 

Education/Experience:

Years of Related Professional Experience: 5.

BA/BS in Marketing, Digital Marketing, Communications, or Design or equivalent years of education and experience. 5 years experience in digital marketing. Strong preference for a background in the outdoor and/or apparel industry.

 

Skills:

· Demonstrated social crisis management experience.

Prior management of agencies, freelancers, and/or direct reports.

Proven ability to grow communities, in terms of engagement rates, raw growth in

follower numbers, and rank vs. brand competitors.

Competency in coordinating programs with distributed global teammates.

Organized, flexible, and collaborative.

Advanced knowledge of digital media (search, email, affiliate, mobile, etc).

Knowledge of web development.

Strong project management skills.

Ability to lead cross functional digital marketing projects for on-time

in-budget delivery.

Strong written and verbal communications and negotiations skills.

 

Special Requirements:

Travel – 10%

 

Key Responsibilities

 

1. Direct team of coordinators to manage the daily tasks of sourcing and publishing social media content, maintaining a daily dialogue with the brand’s fans and followers, and moderating, monitoring, and measuring the flow of both fan and brand content.

2. Coordinate with the content development and production teams to devise both paid and organic content distribution strategies.

3. Set the path and POV for the brand’s social media editorial voice, purpose, and short-term and long-term calendars.

4. Broaden social media access and tactics beyond the marketing function to other areas of the business, including customer service, retail, sales, and product.

5. Advise brand and media planning teams on the newest and most effective paid social media placements.

6. Devise brand-accurate strategies for consumer engagement, including user-generated content, sweepstakes, and contests.

7. Communicate with VF sister brands on social media wins, campaigns, tactics, pitfalls, agencies, and toolkits.

8. Determine and continuously adjust the brand’s social media software toolkit for publishing, monitoring, and quantifying the impact of social media content and communication.

9. Contribute to both seasonal and go-to-market campaigns with innovative social media strategies.

10. Collaborate with corporate communications to establish and refine or crisis management monitoring and response protocols.

 

https://vfc.taleo.net/careersection/jobdetail.ftl?job=THE0023I&lang=en&sns_id=addthis-service-code

 

2.)  Sports Marketing Coordinator, The North Face, Alameda, CA

https://vfc.taleo.net/careersection/jobdetail.ftl?job=THE0024D&lang=en&sns_id=addthis-service-code

 

3.)  Deputy Vice President of Communications, National Parks Conservation Association, Washington, DC

 

Spearheads the development and implementation of integrated media and marketing campaigns to support our programmatic priorities and raise the visibility of our brand with key audiences. Determines the overall content of, and coordinates

 

operations for, all earned media, including digital, print, radio, and television. Works closely with the Vice President of Communications to ensure coordination and integration of ongoing communications campaigns, including media, online, and design. Participates in organizational messaging, and provides strategic guidance to media team and policy leads in developing talking points and collateral materials to support those messages.

 

Seeks opportunities to raise the organization’s visibility through marketing initiatives tied to our strategic Communications efforts, working closely with staff in Communications, Development, and Membership. Monitors the media landscape to keep tabs on issues that could potentially harm the organization, and alerts the VP of potential crises communications issues. Oversees the media team and the media budget, including related consultants.

 

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS:

 

·         Provides strategic direction for the organization’s integrated media campaigns, working in concert with policy

 

staff and the media team to develop targeted, integrated campaigns, including related materials such as radio campaigns and Public Service Announcements. 30 percent

 

·         Develops and maintains relationships with key national media reps, including bloggers; oversees creation and implementation of all media campaigns (regional and national) and activities. 20 percent

 

·         Manages media relations staff, interns, and consultants, and the media budget. Seeks opportunities through marketing initiatives to raise the organization’s brand visibility. 20 percent

 

·         Provides support for creation of tactics such as policy position papers, testimony, congressional letters, reports, and other materials, which support organizational priorities. 15 percent

 

·         Serves as an integral member of the Communications management team. 10 percent

 

·         Monitors landscape for potential crises communications issues. 5 percent

 

TOUR OF DUTY:  9:00 to 5:00, Monday – Friday

 

SCOPE OF POSITION:  Some interaction via telephone with donors and members, members of the Board of Trustees, NPCA staff, outside groups, and vendors. Interacts with all departments as well as regional directors.

 

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

•Demonstrated experience and leadership in managing a comprehensive strategic communications, media relations, and marketing program to advance mission and goals.

•Innovative thinker and creative implementer of strategic communications campaigns.

•Demonstrated experience in designing and implementing strategic communications campaigns to support programmatic work.

•Demonstrated expertise using social media in a strategic, creative way to support integrated communications campaigns to

 

enhance brand recognition and programmatic priorities.

•Demonstrated skill in proactively building relationships with top tier reporters and editors and successfully positioning subject matter with the media (traditional and digital) to achieve high-impact placements.

•At least 5 years of experience in a management role.

•At least 7 years of experience engaged in strategic communications

•Experienced in conservation policy

•Exceptional written, oral, interpersonal, and presentation skills

•Proven ability to manage an efficient, effective team.

•Demonstrated attention to detail and accuracy.

•Ability to work under pressure and meet deadlines.

•Baccalaureate degree in communications, journalism, or related field, master’s preferred.

 

Core Values

 

Live, honor, and own the organization’s Core Values:

 

1.    Commitment to Mission:  Commitment to the national parks is essential to our success.

 

2.    Empowerment: Having the tools, skills, facts and inspiration to advocate on behalf of the national parks.

 

3.    Teamwork:  Teamwork, built on a fundamental trust in and respect for each other, is integral to our success.

 

4.    Accountability: Being accountable to each other, our members, and the public, as well as to the excellence, timeliness, and integrity of our work, and the implementation of these core values.

 

5.    Innovation: Exercising insightful creativity, perseverance, and strategic risk-taking to successfully complete our work.

 

6.    Diversity: We believe in and celebrate the diversity of cultural backgrounds, community traditions, and political perspectives at NPCA and in the National Park System.  By integrating such diversity into our work, we will most effectively accomplish our mission.

 

http://ch.tbe.taleo.net/CH12/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=NPCA&cws=1&rid=318

 

4.)  Media Relations Summer Intern, National Parks Conservation Association, Washington, DC

 

Join the media team that successfully works to protect America’s national Parks!  National Parks Conservation Association media relations interns research, develop, implement, and evaluate campaigns, including writing press materials and pitching and placing news stories.  College juniors, seniors, or recent graduates with an interest in public relations and national parks are encouraged to apply. Candidate must be a strong writer who can juggle multiple tasks. Preferred candidate has background in public relations, public affairs, social media, or communications

 

http://ch.tbe.taleo.net/CH12/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=NPCA&cws=1&rid=319

 

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

5.)  Fish Hatchery Superintendent, State of Wyoming, Dubois, WY

http://bit.ly/1iQCCPn

 

6.)  Fisheries Technician 1- Tagging Trailer Assistant, Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Lewiston, ID

http://bit.ly/1iQCO1f

 

7.)  Coho Fisheries Monitoring Intern, Turtle Island Restoration Network, Olema, CA

http://bit.ly/1iQD7ZN

 

8.)  Bicycle Technician, Marriott Vacations Worldwide, Hilton Head Island, SC

http://bit.ly/1pWjuVO

 

9.)  Field Bike Technician – Bay Area Bike Share, Alta, San Francisco, CA

http://bit.ly/1pWkppd

 

10.)  Party Bike Tour Driver, The Thirsty Pedaler, Louisville, KY

http://bit.ly/1pWkCIP

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2014 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

Posted in Main Page, Your Very Next Step Newsletter | Leave a comment

Your Very Next Step newsletter for April 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for April 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“We travel for many reasons: to escape, relax, learn, startle ourselves, sometimes to meet new people, sometimes to get away from familiar ones. But as visitors, we touch only the surface of a place.”

 

– Carl Hoffman

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Ned’s upcoming travel

***  10 Castles You Can Actually Afford to Sleep In

***  40th Annual Mount Rogers Naturalists Rally

***  Wild Edibles and Plants

***  How to Take a Luxury Vacation Without Breaking the Bank

***  Cheap and Chic: 10 Affordable Hawaii Hotels

***  Traverse City woman gives adventure travel a whole new meaning

***  Adventure travel vs. conservation

***  Primal Travel: Alone in Papua

***  Pennsylvania officials urge anglers to prevent wildfires

***  Live Webcast from GOM Ocean Floor

***  Small Town Travel: Four of America’s Most Iconic Trails Converge in Damascus, Virginia

***  Ecologists track D.C. ospreys’ long journey home — from South America to the Anacostia

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

April 2014

Minnesota’s Dinkytown Greenway

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Communications Assistance, Virginia Outdoors Foundation, Williamsburg, VA

2.)  Spring Volunteer Day April 26, Little Buffalo State Park, Newport, PA

3.)  Mounted Assistance Unit (MAU), Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) / Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, Los Angeles, CA

4.)  Volunteer Naturalist, Conservation Commission of Missouri, throughout Missouri

5.)  Arizona Trail – Maintenance – South of Rogers Trough Trailhead, Arizona National Scenic Trail, Arizona Trail Association, Phoenix, AZ

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Ridgerunner- Appalachian Trail CT/MA, Berkshire Trails Program, Appalachian Mountain Club Southern New England Office, South Egremont, MA

2.)  Communications Director, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, Cheyenne, Wyo.

3.)  Mid-Atlantic Corridor Stewardship Coordinator, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Boiling Springs, PA

4.)  Trails Coordinator, Maine Woods Trail Crew, Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands (MBPL) / Plum Creek / Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC), Moosehead Lake Region, Maine

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel, maybe, perhaps:

 

May 11-16, Seattle / Bellingham / Vancouver

 

June 9-10, Abu Dhabi, UAE

 

June 11-12, Bahrain

 

August 18-19-22, Tacoma, Wash.

 

August 22, 23, 24, San Diego, Calif.

 

October 28-29, Nassau, Bahamas

 

***  The Vikings Land at British Museum

http://www.maritime-executive.com/article/The-Vikings-Land-at-British-Museum-2014-03-06/

 

***  10 Castles You Can Actually Afford to Sleep In

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-castles-you-can-actually-afford-to-sleep-in?ref=news_fd_041214

 

***  40th Annual Mount Rogers Naturalists Rally

 

The 40th Annual Mount Rogers Naturalists Rally will be held in Konnarock, VA on Mother’s Day weekend May 9-10, 2014. The many different and overlapping eco-systems of the Mount Rogers area have fascinated scholars and explorers for decades. The event begins with a gathering Friday evening at the Konnarock Community Center-VA 600–for a fried chicken dinner prepared by the Community Association of Konnarock, and a speaker ( this year on pollinators). Field trips depart from the Community Center on Saturday a.m. and p.m. with a wide variety of topics being investigated by participants and the expert trip-leaders. Join us this year to celebrate 40 years of rallying to explore the Mount Rogers biosphere. Go to the mountrogersnaturalistrally.org site for more specifics on the field trips and to reserve your spot for this year’s dinner. Reservations are absolutely, positively necessary as seating is limited.

 

http://mountrogersnaturalistrally.org/

 

***  Wild Edibles and Plants

 

Knowing how to identify what plants you can and can’t eat is one of those skills that may not be essential to modern man, but it can certainly make camping or hiking a little more interesting.

 

http://outdoors.campmor.com/wild-edibles/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=TrailMail-March282014#fbid=OsOFUai_NGF

 

***  How to Take a Luxury Vacation Without Breaking the Bank

 

The Savor Blog

http://blog.savor.co/post/80975536922/how-to-take-a-luxury-vacation-without-breaking-the-bank

 

***  Cheap and Chic: 10 Affordable Hawaii Hotels

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/cheap-and-chic-10-affordable-hawaii-hotels?obref=obinsite#!1-intro

 

***  Traverse City woman gives adventure travel a whole new meaning

 

By Ellen Creager

Detroit Free Press Travel Writer

http://www.freep.com/article/20140330/FEATURES07/303300008/adventure-travel-women-WANT-Pociask

 

(I agree with this comment:  “You can fly to Bora Bora for the same price as flying to Traverse City.”)

 

http://wantexpeditions.com/

 

***  Adventure travel vs. conservation

 

A conversation with outdoor entrepreneur Bill Bryan.

 

High Country News Apr 16, 2014

 

by Ray Ring

 

http://www.hcn.org/issues/46.6/adventure-travel-vs-conservation

http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/city-guides/new-guinea-traveler/

 

***  Primal Travel: Alone in Papua

 

Posted by Keith Bellows of National Geographic Traveler in Travel with Heart on April 14, 2014

 

http://intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com/2014/04/14/primal-travel-alone-in-papua/

 

***  Pennsylvania officials urge anglers to prevent wildfires

 

By Ashley Bennett

 

http://www.gsnmagazine.com/article/40909/pennsylvania_officials_urge_anglers_prevent_wildfi

 

***  Live Webcast from GOM Ocean Floor

 

From April 12-30, members of the public are invited to join NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer as it explores deep-sea habitats in the Gulf of Mexico. Virtual ocean explorers will have the chance to see canyons, deep-sea coral communities, and shipwrecks dating to the early 1800s via live video transmitted from the deep seafloor.

 

http://www.maritime-executive.com/article/Live-Webcast-from-GOM-Ocean-Floor-2014-04-13/

 

***  Small Town Travel: Four of America’s Most Iconic Trails Converge in Damascus, Virginia

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2014/4/7/12523/28596/

 

***  Ecologists track D.C. ospreys’ long journey home — from South America to the Anacostia

 

By Michael E. Ruane

The Washington Post

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/ecologists-track-dc-ospreys-long-journey-home–from-south-america-to-the-anacostia/2014/04/18/78a5dd18-c3fc-11e3-b195-dd0c1174052c_story.htm

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

 

Trail of the Month: April 2014

Minnesota’s Dinkytown Greenway

By Laura Stark

 

“It isn’t the longest bike trail in the city, but it is probably one of the most important,” said Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak, clad in shorts and running shoes on a bright August day last summer before an energetic crowd celebrating the opening of the Dinkytown Greenway.

 

Although only a mile long, the new paved greenway provides a key piece in a biking network that connects the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul. First envisioned 20 years ago, the long-awaited project was eagerly embraced by the community.

 

“I could not believe the size of the turnout,” says Steve Sanders, the University of Minnesota’s alternative transportation manager. “By far, it was the most I’ve ever seen.”

 

Paul Ogren, project manager and engineer for the City of Minneapolis, had the same impression. “I was expecting 50 people, and 250 showed up.”

 

So with virtually no opposition, what took so long?

 

“The Dinkytown Greenway has a long history,” says Sanders. “It was first planned back in 1994, and there’s always been recognition of it as an important piece of infrastructure. But we couldn’t come to an agreement with BNSF Railroad, so the original route had to be changed.”

 

When negotiations with the railroad fell through, Ogren rolled-up his sleeves. With the loss of the potential use of the BNSF corridor for a rail-trail, the route had to be redrawn. But where?

 

“We had to try something entirely different,” Ogren states. “All the neighboring property belonged to the University of Minnesota, so we made a series of designs, even going into the field with a can of spray paint to try and figure out how to fit in a trail.”

 

The University of Minnesota (U of M) was fully supportive of the effort, and the trail now rests entirely on the school’s property. Sanders notes that school administrators were “bound and determined” to make it happen. In particular, he points to the support of Kathleen O’Brien, vice president for university services. “She said, ‘If our stuff is in the way, we’ll move it,'” he affirms.

 

Buildings, loading docks and parking facilities made finding a suitable pathway tricky. “The Dinkytown Greenway has a railroad corridor on one side, and its paving goes right up to the walls of some of the university buildings on the other side,” says Ogren. “It’s shoehorned pretty good.” But, with such a collaborative and cooperative relationship between the City and the University, the trail eventually got done.

 

Critical to the project’s development was funding from the Nonmotorized Transportation Pilot Program (NTPP), a federally funded initiative launched in 2005 that provided $25 million to each of four communities across the country, including Minneapolis, to make biking and walking infrastructure a priority of transportation planning and to measure any resulting changes in transportation behaviors. Rails-to-Trails Conservancy is one of three managing partners and was involved in the program’s design and inception.

 

In Minneapolis, Bike Walk Twin Cities (BWTC) is the local entity for this federal transportation initiative. “The Dinkytown Greenway, long in everyone’s eyes, finally got done thanks to the persistence and funding that came from BWTC,” says Hilary Reeves, communications director for the group. “Funding from the pilot program kicked into reality an incredible expansion of on-street bikeways and trail connections that really make it possible to get anywhere needed on a bike.”

 

Part of the greenway’s new route runs through an old railroad trench, with the Dinkytown commercial district (for which the trail is named) visible 30 feet overhead. A staircase—the slope was too steep to put in a ramp—will be built this year to connect riders in this “Dinkyditch,” with Dinkytown proper up top. The vibrant community (once home to a young Bob Dylan) offers an eclectic mix of stores, restaurants and coffee shops. Different theories swirl about its unusual name, but the most popular one is that it’s named for the small engines—called “dinkys”—that were once a frequent sight in the area’s railroading past.

 

The trail begins near TCF Bank Stadium, home of the Golden Gophers college football team, and continues through the U of M campus on the east bank of the Mississippi River. On the east side of the stadium, a connection can be made to U of M’s Transitway, a three-mile bikeway that connects the school’s Minneapolis and St. Paul campuses.

 

The university has truly embraced bike commuting for its students and employees (the school is one of the top employers in the state). It offers a full-service bike center on campus—just blocks from the Dinkytown Greenway—that has bike parking, bike repair facilities and showers. A dozen bike-sharing Nice Ride stations also dot the campus. According to Sanders, the amenities have made alternative transportation so popular at U of M—bike use has gone up by 40 percent between 2009 and 2013—that the University has actually had to remove car parking to make room for more bike parking.

 

Sanders also notes that new housing is springing up next to the Transitway. “It’s a vibrant place where a lot of redevelopment is happening. They advertise the bikeableness of the area and the fact that you can hop onto this network and go places.”

 

The Dinkytown Greenway is a boon for the Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood, which abuts the university and has a high percentage of renters, largely students, whom Cordelia Pierson, president of the Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association, says are “very interested in biking and walking access throughout the neighborhood and to the Mississippi River.”

 

She adds, “The trail’s name is kind of funny right now because it doesn’t access Dinkytown and it isn’t green.” But both of those issues are soon to change: In addition to the new staircase to access Dinkytown, the neighborhood association is fundraising to plant native prairie grasses, flowers and trees along the trail to bring a sense of vitality to an otherwise utilitarian corridor. Public art and wayfinding signage are also in the works. “We want to help the greenway thrive, so people aren’t just passing through, but want to visit and stay,” she says.

 

The trail’s location adjacent to TCF Bank Stadium may also help bring in some new fans. “The [NFL’s] Vikings are moving to the stadium next to the Dinkytown Greenway,” says Pierson. “For the next two years, while their new stadium is being built, they’ll use this one, so we’re thinking of doing a ‘Biking to the Vikings’ promotion. Getting football fans on bikes can’t be that hard.”

 

Fortuitously, two months before the Purple People Eaters begin playing in August, the METRO light rail system—which welcomes bicyclists with onboard bike racks and station bike lockers—will christen its Green Line that will run through the heart of the U of M campus and include three new stations within a half-mile of the Dinkytown Greenway. This opens up a variety of mixed transit opportunities for residents all over the city, including connections to the famed Mall of America, the Metrodome and the airport on the system’s existing Blue Line.

 

As the trail heads west, it crosses Bridge 9, once used by the Northern Pacific Railroad, but now open for bicyclists and pedestrians. The bridge—a dusky pink of faded U of M maroon—offers spectacular views. Lush tree tops line the Mississippi in vibrant green strokes, while white paddleboats offer splashes of brightness against the dark river.

 

It’s an understandably popular place, especially now that it connects to the Dinkytown Greenway. BWTC, which takes annual biking and walking counts at dozens of locations throughout the Twin Cities, noted in their 2013 report that bicycling on the bridge increased by 53 percent from 2012 to 2013, when the greenway opened.

 

On the river’s west bank, the trail ends at Bluff Street Park, but will be extended under the I-35W Bridge to 13th Avenue South this summer. From there, it’s a short hop to the heavily used bike lanes along 2nd Street that lead to downtown Minneapolis.

 

“The Dinkytown Greenway’s Phase 2 went out to bid, and we wanted to start construction,” says Ogren. “But the weather hasn’t cooperated. We had eight inches of snow three days ago.”

 

In Minneapolis, this is par for the course, but the hardy biking culture is a year-round endeavor. “If you’re a cyclist, these paths are open to ride all winter long,” says Reeves. “You can count on that. They have the same priority as roads.”

 

The cherry on top of the project is that the greenway connects to the Mississippi River Trail, a vast biking route that will one day span the country along America’s most iconic waterway. Minnesota, 1 of 10 states in the network, is in the process of signing its more than 600-mile portion of the route (a mix of on- and off-road segments) from the Iowa border north to the river’s headwaters in Itasca State Park, a project that will be completed by 2015.

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Communications Assistance, Virginia Outdoors Foundation, Williamsburg, VA

 

Assist our communications office with publications and media relations activities, such as writing, photography, and graphic design.

 

Specific Tasks:

•Write article and copy for newsletters, brochures, Web site, and other publications.

•Take photographs on assignment for use in VOF publications.

•Assist with graphic design and conceptualization of VOF publications.

•Conduct interviews for stories and press releases.

•Assist with permissions and fact-checking activities.

 

Qualifications:

•Must have proven skills in writing, photography, or graphic design. Applicants will be asked to submit samples of their work.

•Must be able to project an image, in appearance and character, that reflects positively on VOF and its mission.

•Must be able to effectively convey the mission and message of VOF to the target audience.

•Prior knowledge of VOF’s programs and activities is preferred

 

Training:

•VOF orientation

•On-the-job training

•Experience may substitute for some training

 

Time Commitment:

 

This work can be accomplished on an as-needed basis.

 

http://www.virginiaoutdoorsfoundation.org/volunteer/volunteer-opportunities/communications-assistance/

 

2.)  Spring Volunteer Day April 26, Little Buffalo State Park, Newport, PA

http://www.apps.dcnr.state.pa.us/Calendar/view_event.asp?CalendarID=34687&Location=List

 

3.)  Mounted Assistance Unit (MAU), Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) / Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, Los Angeles, CA

 

The MAU patrols Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) managed parks in the Santa Susana Mountains from Moorpark to Santa Clarita. They also patrol Puente Hills Landfill Native Habitat Preservation Authority owned or managed properties in the cities of Whittier, Hacienda Heights and La Habra Heights in addition to Bosque del Rio Hondo. Members of the unit ride their own horses on trails and fire roads providing visitor services under the supervision of MRCA rangers. Each member is asked to patrol a minimum of 60 hours and attend at least two quarterly meetings per year.

 

http://www.lamountains.com/involved.asp

 

4.)  Volunteer Naturalist, Conservation Commission of Missouri, throughout Missouri

 

Witnessing the wild-eyed excitement of a kid reeling in her first fish and feeling the satisfaction of teaching others to build butterfly gardens are just some of the fun you can experience as a Conservation Department volunteer naturalist. Volunteer naturalists help assure that each visitor to a conservation facility gets the most out of his or her visit. Our comprehensive training program enables volunteer naturalists to lead a wide variety of conservation activities. The program has limited openings and age requirements. The volunteer naturalist position also requires a higher level of commitment, but those who are up to the task will find it very rewarding. For more information contact the volunteer coordinator for the facility at which you would like to volunteer.

http://mdc.mo.gov/about-us/get-involved/mdc-volunteer-programs/become-conservation-volunteer

 

5.)  Arizona Trail – Maintenance – South of Rogers Trough Trailhead, Arizona National Scenic Trail, Arizona Trail Association, Phoenix, AZ

 

Join Arizona Trail Association Segment Steward Craig Gregory and other hardy volunteers as we take revenge on the infamous cats claw on AZT Passage 18b. It isn’t too bad yet but a little work now will save a lot of work later. Tasks include pruning and grubbing out the roots of this particularly nasty bush, as well as some light tread work. RSVP to unlimitedduck@gmail.com for additional details, to reserve your lunch and to let us know if you can drive up the mountain.

 

Contact: Craig Gregory   unlimited_duck@yahoo.com.

 

Offered by: Arizona Trail Association

 

http://www.outdoorvolunteer.org/viewevent.aspx?eventid=891

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Ridgerunner- Appalachian Trail CT/MA, Berkshire Trails Program, Appalachian Mountain Club Southern New England Office, South Egremont, MA

 

Job Dates:  May 19 – August 22, 2014

 

Hiring Timeline:  Applications are accepted on a rolling basis, starting in December.  Interviews are held in January and February.  Final notice is sent out by the end of March.

 

Position Summary

 

AMC Ridgerunners on the Appalachian Trail in Connecticut and the southern part of Massachusetts are a vital part of the management of the trail in these states.  Ridgerunners live on the trail all summer, in ten-day shifts, hiking 8-12 miles per day and camping out at campsites along the way.  Ridgerunners contact over 5,000 trail users annually, informing them of Leave No Trace principles, area regulations and trails, backpacking techniques, AT history, and management practices.  Ridgerunners gather important information such as maintenance concerns and use patterns.  They are the eyes and ears of the AT and the public face of the AMC.

 

Ridgerunners work ten days on with four days off, and weekend work is required.  Duties include backpacking and camping, accurate collection of information including report writing, light trail maintenance, and participation in volunteer trail work parties, among other duties.  The position is from mid-May to late August and is a seasonal, non-exempt, hourly position reporting to the AMC Regional Trails Supervisor.

 

Responsibilities

•Backpack or day hike (depending on assigned route) up to 12 miles per day and camp in specified, designated camping areas for 10 days/nights in a row.

•Interact with as many backcountry visitors as possible, providing trail information and promoting Leave No Trace ethics.

•Lead Leave No Trace Awareness workshops and Leave No Trace Trainer courses for teens, as needed.

•Assist with light trail maintenance including drainage clearing and participating in weekly trail work parties as needed.

•Foster professional relationships with local officials and AMC volunteers.

•Legibly fill out daily reports about trail conditions and backcountry use.

•Pack out litter from backcountry.

•Monitor and maintain backcountry waste management facilities and assist trail work crews.

 

Qualifications

•Extensive backpacking experience, required.

•Solo backpacking experience required

•Willingness to work long hours in solitude, frequently in isolated areas, required.

•Valid driver’s license and reliable transportation, required.

•Wilderness First Aid and CPR or Wilderness First Responder certifications, required (training can be provided prior to the start date at no-cost).

•Excellent communication skills.

•Strong desire and ability to work with the public.

•Ability to work unsupervised, to take initiative, and to work as part of a team.

•Ability to make professional decisions under pressure.

•Physically able to travel safely in the backcountry in all weather conditions carrying up to 50 lbs. of gear.

•Background in environmental sciences, natural resources or education, preferred.

•Strong interest in backcountry management, desirable.

•Knowledge of the Appalachian Trail, helpful.

•High School diploma, GED preferred.

 

Benefits

•AMC Membership

•30% Staff discount on AMC retail products

•4 Free Nights at AMC Huts, Lodges and other facilities while employed

 

Questions and Additional Information:

Alice P. Webber

Southern New England Trails Supervisor

P.O. Box 131

South Egremont, MA 01258

413.528.8003

awebber@outdoors.org

 

To apply, please fill out an online application at http://www.outdoors.org/seasonal or submit a cover letter and resume to awebber@outdoors.org.

 

AMC has zero tolerance for the abuse of children. Any employee with access to children will have a criminal record check performed and have references checked regarding their past work with children.

 

The AMC is an Equal Opportunity Employer, and an Equal Opportunity Service Provider. The AMC values diversity in the workplace.

https://apply.coolworks.com/amc/job-details.asp?JobID=21386

 

***  From Amber Leberman:

 

Hello, Ned,

 

Thanks in advance for your consideration of a job opening at my agency for “Jobs of the Week.” Details below.

 

Amber

 

2.)  Communications Director, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, Cheyenne, Wyo.

 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

Serving as Public Information Officer (PIO) directs and guides public information campaigns and strategies; develops media, marketing and communications plans and strategies to guide overall outreach efforts; works closely with Director’s and Governor’s office, addressing important information and education issues and priorities; serves as a member of Game and Fish Department staff which collectively addresses management issues, polices and overall budget. Working under the Deputy Director of External Operations, supervises the following programs: Conservation Education Services; Recruitment, Retention, and Reactivation of hunters and anglers; Publications; Video Production; Graphic Design; Human Dimensions; Volunteer Program; and Customer Outreach Services.

 

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS:

  • Works closely with Director’s office, other agency administrators and regional personnel coordinating media contact; guides public information campaigns and strategies.
  • Develops media, marketing and communications plans and strategies, guiding agency in its overall outreach efforts; works closely with agency Director’s and Governor’s office to address important information and education issues and priorities (PIO functions).
  • Directs, supervises and delegates supervision to subordinate personnel.
  • Evaluate and report on the effectiveness of communications activities.
  • Hire, evaluate and develop staff to support the achievement of the objective and goals related to communications, media relations, and partner cultivation and events.
  • Works continuously to gain a deep understanding of stakeholder needs.
  • Demonstrates effective oral, written and interpersonal communication skills that keep our clients, partners and colleagues informed and engaged as we operate in a fast-paced and rapidly changing environment.
  • Administers Education functions, including Conservation Education Services, Publications and Customer Outreach Services (Publications, Customer Outreach).
  • Create continuity and clarity in communication across all departments.

 

QUALIFICATIONS:

 

PREFERENCES:

Preference will be given to those with experience or training in communication, marketing, public relations and/ or media relations.

 

Must have a valid drivers license.

 

KNOWLEDGE:

  • The ability to take knowledge and transform into exciting and useful messages, and disseminate it to the right audiences through the best distribution channels.
  • Highly collaborative style; experience developing and implementing communications strategies.
  • Excellent writing/editing and verbal communication skills.
  • Strong track record as an implementer who thrives on managing a variety of key initiatives concurrently.
  • High energy, maturity, and leadership with the ability to serve as a unifying force and to position communications discussions at both the strategic and tactical levels.
  • Self-starter, able to work independently, enjoys creating and implementing new initiatives.
  • Knowledge of public information and media practices; knowledge of marketing principles, brand creation and integrity, and targeted messaging.
  • Knowledge of conservation education programs; knowledge of publication production; knowledge of recruitment and retention principles; knowledge of principles, concepts and current practices of Wyoming State Government, including budget development and management and purchasing.
  • Knowledge of personnel management; knowledge of wildlife management and state wildlife agency operations.
  • Skill in communicating issues to a wide array of professional and lay persons.
  • Skill in oral and written communications; skill in interpersonal relations; skill in fiscal control and budget preparation.
  • Skill in decision-making and directing and delegating work activities; skill in prioritizing allocation of finite personnel and financial resources to meet intra- and inter-departmental needs.
  • Open to and thoughtfully considers the ideas, input, and perspectives of others.
  • Demonstrates flexibility to adapt to changing situations, needs and environments.

 

SALARY: $6,581.00 – $7,742.00 Monthly

http://wgfd.wyo.gov/gameandfishjobs/frmViewJobListings.aspx

 

3.)  Mid-Atlantic Corridor Stewardship Coordinator, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Boiling Springs, PA

 

The Appalachian Trail Conservancy’s mission is to preserve and manage the Appalachian Trail – ensuring that its vast natural beauty and priceless cultural heritage can be shared and enjoyed today, tomorrow, and for centuries to come.

 

CORRIDOR STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM MISSION

The mission of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) Corridor Stewardship Program is to support the Trail Clubs and steward the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (ANST) National Park Service corridor lands (fee lands and easements), which protect the Appalachian Trail corridor and the Trail ‘experience’, through effective implementation of the cooperative management system involving ATC, Trail-maintaining Clubs, and public-agency partners. The Corridor Stewardship Program implements the annual task agreement developed with the National Park Service’s Appalachian Trail Park Office (APPA).

 

POSITION SUMMARY

This position serves as the primary point of contact for all boundary monitoring and maintenance related stewardship actions for the Appalachian National Scenic Trail in the assigned region.  The Corridor Stewardship Program Coordinator facilitates collaboration and cooperation between Trail-maintaining Clubs and public-agency partners to achieve monitoring and management of tracts and boundaries that protect the Appalachian Trail.  This position is responsible for supporting and coordinating regional corridor boundary monitoring and maintenance programs, collecting, organizing and analyzing boundary data, conducting boundary monitoring and maintenance training, conducting and coordinating encroachment mitigation efforts, and supervising seasonal Boundary Technicians. The Coordinator works with other ATC staff, volunteers, the Appalachian Trail Park Office, National Park Service Land Acquisition Office for National Scenic Trails, numerous state agencies, and other entities involved with the Appalachian Trail. The position requires frequent travel and weekend work.

 

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

•In collaboration with program staff and agency partners, establishes a structured, systematic program of boundary monitoring and maintenance that will facilitate perpetual protection of Appalachian National Scenic Trail tracts and boundary lines

•Responsible for planning and managing program budget, implementing annual task agreement, purchasing supplies, and maintaining tools and equipment.

•Aggregates, organizes, maintains, and analyzes boundary data to develop work projects for supporting and coordinating boundary monitoring and maintenance activities

•In collaboration with program staff and agency partners, develops and revises standard operating procedures and protocols that contribute to program operations and standardization of methodology

•Facilitates communication and cooperation with Trail-maintaining Clubs and agency partners

•Coordinates boundary monitoring and maintenance projects with Trail Clubs.

•Maintains computerized data management systems which manage boundary data and information and produce reports in collaboration with program and agency partners.

•Compiles monthly and annual summaries of regional program accomplishments to be presented to ATC senior staff and agency partners

•Reinforces, sustains, and acts as the ATC proponent for regional Trail Club corridor stewardship programs

•Responsible for collaboratively developing and presenting standardized training methodology, materials, and learning opportunities to regional Trail Clubs, volunteers, staff, and agency partners

•Responds to, manages, and mitigates reported threatened or actual corridor and boundary violations/ encroachments in accordance with established standard operating procedures

•May assist Trail Clubs with episodic crew recruitment, training, and management for boundary monitoring and maintenance projects

•Supervises seasonal Boundary Technicians; includes administrative duties related to supervisory responsibilities

•Other duties as assigned

 

QUALIFICATIONS

•BA/BS degree. Degree in conservation biology, ecology, forestry, natural resources management, engineering, surveying, or outdoor resource related field preferred.

•Creativity and attention to detail while handling multiple tasks and meeting assigned deadlines

•Ability to solve problems and handle issues of a complicated / complex nature

•Skilled in project management and contract oversight.

•Familiarity with the Appalachian Trail or other trail work experience is desirable

•Strong communication skills, ability to maintain favorable relations, and inspire cooperation with volunteers

•Supervisory and project planning and implementation experience is required

•Ability to develop and present training programs with a variety of media.

•Experience living and working outdoors, including primitive, backcountry camping

•Demonstrated proficiency with map and compass, survey plats, and orienteering

•Ability to interpret and work with maps/plans oriented towards natural resources, land use, development, or engineering/construction

•Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, Google applications and GIS

•Must be willing and able to work flexible schedule including weekends

 

PHYSICAL DEMANDS AND WORK ENVIRONMENT

•Work environment is in a multi-person office situation with moderate noise

•Regular use of a computer is required; Microsoft Office, ESRI GIS, and Google applications are used

•Frequent travel and weekend work is required

•Requires Wilderness First Responder and CPR Training; can be obtained post-hire minimum WFA at hire

•Requires valid state driver’s license with a safe driving record,

•Incumbent will be exposed to hazardous physical conditions and seasonal exposure to extreme weather conditions, including rain, snow, humidity, intense heat, and sunlight

•Incumbent must be able to handle heavy brush, walk for extended periods, stand for long periods, perform routine moderate lifting, and to carry up to 50 pounds in a backpack over a minimum of three miles, traverse rough uneven terrain, and wet and slippery surfaces.

 

TO APPLY

 

The deadline to apply is May 2, 2014. To apply please email a cover letter, resume, and three references to lbresette@appalachiantrail.org.   All resumes should be titled as “Last Name_First Name.”  Please include the position title and your name in the email subject line.  An example subject line will read: “Mid-Atlantic Corridor Stewardship Coordinator: Joan Smith.”

 

http://www.appalachiantrail.org/who-we-are/job-opportunities/mid-atlantic-corridor-stewardship-coordinator

 

4.)  Trails Coordinator, Maine Woods Trail Crew, Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands (MBPL) / Plum Creek / Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC), Moosehead Lake Region, Maine

https://apply.coolworks.com/amc/job-details.asp?JobID=39403

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
© 2014 The Job of the Week Network LLC
Edward Lundquist, ABC –
Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
7813 Richfield Road
Springfield, VA 22153
Home office phone: (703) 455-7661
lundquist989@cs.com
www.nedsjotw.com

To subscribe:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

 

 

 

 

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Your Very Next Step newsletter for March 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for March 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Men go abroad to wonder at the heights of mountains, at the huge waves of the sea, at the long courses of the rivers, at the vast compass of the ocean, at the circular motions of the stars, and they pass by themselves without wondering.”

– Saint Augustine

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

This issue of YVNS comes to you from Accra, Ghana.

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Ned’s upcoming travel

***  Safe!  Or not?  Baseball on donkeys?

***  Reforesting your land in Virginia

***  Top 10 wackiest hotels

***  Are airlines right to change their miles programs?

***  America’s 10 Best Spots for Seeing Wildflowers

***  10 Best All-Inclusive Resorts for Families in the US

***  Eight islands you’ll never set foot on

***  My Ghana adventure

***  The Top 10 Weird Restaurants Around the World

***  What’s a Lasher?

***  World’s 20 Most Stunning Libraries

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: March 2014

Georgia’s Atlanta Beltline

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer opportunities, The New Mexico Volunteers for the Outdoors, Albuquerque, NM

2.)  Volunteer opportunities, The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture is a division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, Santa Fe, NM

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Philadelphia Community Conservation Crew Leaders, Student Conservation Association (SCA), Philadelphia, PA and Camden, NJ

2.)  Facilities Coordinator, Special Events, National Audubon Society, Inc., Audubon, PA

3.)  Marketing Strategy Officer, Marine Mammal Center, Sausalito, California

4.)  The Manager, Federal Relations, National fish and wildlife foundation, Washington, DC

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel, maybe, perhaps:

 

March 25-26-27, Monterey, Calif.

 

April 11-13, Boston/Bath, Maine

 

June 9-10, Abu Dhabi, UAE

 

June 11-12, Bahrain

 

August 18-19-22, Tacoma, Wash.

 

August 22, 23, 24, San Diego, Calif.

 

November 3-6, Nassau, Bahamas

 

***  Safe!  Or not?  Baseball on donkeys?

Katie Rosenbrock, TheActiveTimes.com

http://wapc.mlb.com/cutfour/2014/03/03/68620896/there-are-people-playing-baseball-while-riding-on-donkeys

 

***  Reforesting your land in Virginia:

 

Tree Seedlings Selling Fast—Order Yours Before They’re Gone Each year, the Virginia Department of Forestry (VDOF) grows and sells more than 24 million tree seedlings. And every year, many of the more than 40 species sell out before the harvest season ends in April. If you are looking to plant tree seedlings or reforest your land this year, you still have a few weeks remaining to order your seedlings. Landowners may still purchase seed mixes, shrubs and quality bare-root tree seedlings in specialty packets for wildlife habitat enhancement, stream bank stabilization, Christmas tree plantations, fall and spring colors, timber stand establishment, urban forests, biodiversity and improvement of watersheds management. Learn why Virginia trees are your best choice. Order yours today by visiting the VDOF Web store, calling the Augusta Forestry Center at (540) 363-7000, or contacting your local VDOF office.

 

http://www.dof.virginia.gov/nursery/research.htm

 

***  Top 10 wackiest hotels

 

Our compilation of the world’s most unusual places to stay

http://www.hotels.com/deals/us-wackiest-hotels/

 

***  Are airlines right to change their miles programs?

Christopher Elliott , Special for USA TODAY

http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/flights/2014/03/03/airline-frequent-flier-loyalty-program-changes/5968455/

 

 

***  America’s 10 Best Spots for Seeing Wildflowers

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/americas-10-best-spots-for-seeing-wildflowers?ref=news_fd_030814

 

***  10 Best All-Inclusive Resorts for Families in the US

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-best-all-inclusive-resorts-for-families-in-the-us?ref=news_fd_030814#!1-intro

 

***  Eight islands you’ll never set foot on

http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/destinations/2014/03/04/private-exclusive-forbidden-island/5978811/

 

***  My Ghana adventure:

 

My flight from Washington to Addis Ababa on Ethiopian was aboard a new Boeing 787 Dreamliner.  Originally I was booked on a 777 flight connecting to a 767.  When it was changed to a 787 connecting to a 757 the seat assignments were mixed up.  (I believe now that my return flight will be on a 767 connecting to a 787.)

 

I watched a couple of movies because I couldn’t plug in my laptop.  I saw The Departed and looked for—and saw—Scot Cregan who was an extra in the film.

 

It was my second time on a 787 (my first was on Air India between Delhi and Bangalore).  I sat next to a young lady from Accra now living in the U.S. going back to visit family, and an elderly woman who was not an experienced traveler.  The woman spoke no English, but that didn’t stop her from talking to me.  I occasional asked the flight attendant to interpret in Amharic.  The various containers on her meal tray, such as salad dressing, butter, yoghurt, jelly, were mysteries and challenges to her.

 

I had a short connection time in Addis, with no time to check on my seat assignment at the transfer desk.  When I got to the gate, I noticed that the temporary toilets in the Gate 1 area were over flowing.  I cleaning woman finally showed up with a dustpan, bucket and mop and started scooping.  One of the passengers from my DC flight who was also continuing on to Accra jumped in to help the lady sent to try and clean up the mess, but together they could barely keep up.

 

I did manage to get myself a bulkhead exit row seat, and promptly fell asleep.  I woke up a couple of hours into the flight, but then realized we hadn’t taken off yet.

 

I was met upon arrival at Accra by a member of the Ghana Army, helped me through “diplomatic” passport control, helped me retrieve my bags, and then representatives from the Ghana Navy repos took me to my hotel and made sure I was settled in.

 

The Novotel pool was warm, but not too warm.  It’s the hangout for the Delta crews that layover at the Novotel.

 

The Sunday buffet at the Movenpick hotel in Accra is the place to be.  After a long walk in the hot sun it was a cool and appetizing way to enjoy the afternoon.

 

Our Monday agenda featured a flight to Takoradi aboard a Ghana Air Force C295, and a visit to the Naval Dockyard at Sekondi and the base at Takoradi.

 

I moderated the third day of the Coastal and Maritime Surveillance Africa 2014 conference.  I thought the Ghana Navy and IQPC produced a fabulous event and was delighted to be a part of it.

 

Ghana is a beautiful country with warm and friendly people that make youy feel safe and welcome.  It is an English-speaking nation surrounded my Francophone countries.  It has a transparent busiess and governance environment and is much more conducsive to investment because of it.  There are many valuable resources here, so the question is why is Ghana still relatively a poor country.  I see great opportunity and a bright future for Ghana.

 

***  The Top 10 Weird Restaurants Around the World

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/The-Top-10-Weird-Restaurants-Around-the-World/?cid=eltrTop10

 

***  What’s a Lasher?

 

By Laughing Dog

 

In the last couple of years, the term “Lasher” has wormed its way into the long-distance hiker’s vernacular. It’s an acronym for Long-Ass-Section-Hiker, meaning one who hikes a long trail in, uh, really long sections. While that seems lacking in clearly defined parameters, distances hiked are apparently greater than yer run-of-the-mill section hiker, which is not, in itself, defined by any distance parameters.

 

But, in the words of Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart “I know it when I see it.”

 

Neville, of Woods Hole Hostel, told us a story about a hiker who, upon hearing the distance a self-proclaimed section hiker was hiking, said “that’s a long-ass section, dude!” (Or words to that effect.) Neville spontaneously suggested that made him a “Lasher.” Now, in her characteristically unassuming way, she allowed that she’s subsequently heard that others have claimed to have made up the term. But I give credit to Neville.

 

And it has come to define how I am hiking the Appalachian Trail.

 

In spring of 2012, I started out like most, hiking north from Springer Mountain in Georgia in a thru-hike attempt. A bursitis in my knee cut that short just across the North Carolina border . I went home, treated the pain, and saw a physical therapist who found the underlying cause. That summer I climbed Mt Katahdin, and headed south on another thru attempt. 538 miles later, I was in a hostel looking at a big lump in my abdomen. The doctor said I needed hernia surgery, stat …

 

With 644 miles of the trail behind me, I redefined myself as a section hiker, got back on where I got off the previous spring, sprained my ankle 3 hours in, and hiked north, slowly, till it was time to go to our family’s reunion. That took me 674 miles to the James River Bridge. Just shy of Shenandoah. That’s a long-ass section if ever I seen one.

 

1318 miles down, 867 to go …

 

In between sections, I saved my pennies and tweaked my gear. My pack’s base weight is now just short of 15 lbs, and a good deal of that can be sent home when the mountains warm up.

 

This spring I’ll get back on at James River bridge, and hike north. Barring injury, emergent surgical needs, vector-borne diseases, hurricanes, or government shut downs, I may just finish the AT in one last, Long-Ass Section Hike.

 

(Note: All distances were taken from the appropriate year’s database at atdist.com/.  Who in turn get theirs from the ATC’s annual publication “Appalachian Trail Data Book.”

 

***  World’s 20 Most Stunning Libraries

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/worlds-20-most-stunning-libraries?ref=news_fd_031514

 

***  Learning to Lead

 

Inside AMC’s Mountain Leadership School

 

Story by Ty Wivell

 

AMC Outdoors, March/April 2014

 

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/2014/features/learning-to-lead.cfm?utm_source=magazine

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

 

Rail Trail of the Month: March 2014

Georgia’s Atlanta Beltline

By Laura Stark

 

Railroad corridor: Southern Railway, Seaboard Air Line Railroad, Atlanta and West Point Railroad, and Louisville and Nashville Railroad

 

Trail website: Atlanta BeltLine, Inc. (http://beltline.org/)

 

Length: A total of 33 miles are planned for the Atlanta BeltLine. Currently, 6.8 miles are paved and open in four disconnected segments: Eastside Trail, West End Trail, Northside Trail, and Southwest Connector Trail. An additional three segments awaiting development (totaling about four miles) are available as unpaved hiking trails in the interim.

 

Start Point/End Point: The Atlanta BeltLine will form a loop around the city from Lindbergh Drive in the north to Lee Street in the south, and from Marietta Boulevard in the west to DeKalb Avenue in the east.

 

To navigate the area with an interactive GIS map, and to see more photos, user reviews and ratings, plus loads of other trip-planning information, visit RTC’s free trail-finder website, TrailLink.com.

 

Rentals: Near the BeltLine’s Eastside Trail, bicycle rentals are available from Atlanta BeltLine Bicycle (151 Sampson Street NE; 404-588-9930) and Skate Escape (1086 Piedmont Avenue NE; 404-892-1292).

 

Spring is upon us, and perhaps no region is more thankful than the South, hit especially hard by an unusually brutal winter. Residents of The Big Peach are more than ready to head out on the Atlanta Beltline to soak up the warmer weather. In a city once known as Terminus, the BeltLine trail network is a re-envisioning of its railroad past for a new wave of pedestrian and bike-friendly urban design.

 

“We have an electric counter on the Eastside Trail, and it logged 9,700 people on the trail this past Sunday,” says Lee Harrop, program management officer for Atlanta BeltLine, Inc. “There was no one in Atlanta sitting on their couch.”

 

The two-mile Eastside Trail, which starts at Piedmont Park, the crown jewel of Atlanta’s park system, is one of the most popular segments of the BeltLine. And perhaps there’s no prettier time to enjoy it; this month, showy pink and white blossoms—the stars of the guided Magnolia Tree Walks hosted by Trees Atlanta, which has planted hundreds of trees along the BeltLine—will be on full display.

 

Three other BeltLine trails, West End, Northside and the Southwest Connector, have also been built around the city and total about seven miles. All are paved. Another three trail segments awaiting development (totaling about four miles) are available as natural hiking trails in the interim. Eventually, the trail will connect more than 40 neighborhoods.

 

“The minute we start connecting them together will be an incredible day for the city,” says Ed McBrayer, executive director for the PATH Foundation, which manages the construction of the trail. “People are starting to exercise that never used to, and the trail’s proximity to their houses seems to be the key. The BeltLine has a significant impact on the health of the people around it, no doubt about it.”

 

Even at this stage, with only a handful of its proposed 33 miles completed, Atlanta BeltLine, Inc., which implements the project, estimates that the annual trail usage exceeds a million people.

 

“People love the BeltLine,” says Curt Soper, Georgia/Alabama state director of the Trust for Public Land, which helps acquire the land for the trail. “The neighborhoods that are touched by it see the value it brings. It improves their quality of life.”

 

Rather than the straight line of a typical rail-trail, the growing BeltLine will form a 22-mile loop around the city, with another 11 miles of spur trail that tie in to neighborhoods and parks. While not precisely a circle—it was once dubbed the “green ghost” for its shape—the rail-trail at the core of the project comprises four different inactive freight lines.

 

“Atlanta has always been a railroad town,” says Ryan Gravel, senior urban designer for Perkins+Will, the firm that designed the Eastside Trail. “There were railroads everywhere.”

 

Gravel, whose 1999 master’s thesis helped the BeltLine concept take wing, grew up in the suburbs of Atlanta, where he remembers enjoying the sound of the trains at night. For him, the “adventurous quality” of railroads was captivating. A culmination of his experiences exploring the city’s old rail corridors, and a trip abroad, where he was inspired by Paris’s rail-trail greenbelt known as the Promenade Plantée, planted the seeds for his exposé on reusing Atlanta’s ring of freight railroad to meet modern public transportation needs.

 

“At the end of the 1990s, the idea was emerging that a lot of this industrial land laying fallow could be repurposed for a new way of life,” says Gravel, who is now a Board member of the Atlanta BeltLine Partnership, a nonprofit organization that raises awareness and support for the trail.

 

As a student at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Gravel’s thesis focused on utilizing the rail corridor for a new light-rail system. The idea took hold when he sent the proposal to city officials and caught the eye of Cathy Woolard, who immediately championed the idea and pushed it forward when she became president of the Atlanta City Council. This spring, the long-awaited first phase of the Atlanta Streetcar will open downtown, just five blocks from the Eastside Trail. Future expansion is planned to connect the streetcar with the BeltLine. The trail and active rail line will form a parallel loop around the city in what is known as a rail-with-trail.

 

More than two decades ago, when Marianne Fowler—then new to Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (now senior VP of federal relations)—was tasked with visiting Atlanta to survey the city’s aging railroad corridor for potential conversion to rail-trail, she was “astounded by what a connector it was.”

 

Seeing the startling potential of the city’s ring of railroads that were likely to soon be abandoned, she wrote in her 1991 report, “As Atlanta surveys its sobering lack of open space and its diminished prospects for linear greenways, the 20 miles of rail line circling downtown gain significance… To encircle a major American city with a combined 20-mile rail rotary and rail-trail park would be a feat of extraordinary vision and brilliant engineering.”

 

Today, such a feat is becoming reality. To provide people with a peek at the trail’s progress, the Atlanta BeltLine Partnership offers free, narrated bus tours of the developing trail on Friday and Saturday mornings, and the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition leads guided bicycle tours on the weekends.

 

“In the beginning, we were selling air, we had nothing to show,” says Harrop. “So we started giving three-hour tours that zigzag around the proposed BeltLine. The tours are so popular now, they book up within a couple of hours.”

 

Not only is the BeltLine itself a recreational amenity, it’s spurring the development of new parks and improvements to existing parks throughout the city. The trail’s open segments already link to several of these parks, and more are on the way. In 2004, the Trust for Public Land commissioned an urban planner at Yale University to address the need for more park acreage in the city and investigate opportunities for green space along the BeltLine.

 

“Alexander Garvin took Ryan’s thesis and added to it,” says Soper. “He added nodes of parks so the BeltLine would be more than just a rail-trail loop. It’s helping Atlanta move up the list of world-class cities as far as parks are concerned.”

 

After the study’s publication, the Trust for Public Land began acquiring land for the parks outlined in the report. The first major city park built on the BeltLine was completed in 2012. “Historic Fourth Ward Park is built on what was a dilapidated, run-down area,” says Soper. “Now that neighborhood is booming. It’s ground zero for the economic recovery in Atlanta.”

 

Harrop agrees, “You walk down the Eastside Trail, and there’s so much construction it’s unreal. There’s been $1.1 billion in private investment along the trail: a 3-to-1 return on investment.”

 

Gravel lives along the Eastside Trail and could not be happier with all the growth stemming from the trail. “When we’re out on the trail, there are always mobs of people. The BeltLine is changing the way that people live in a really profound way.”

 

Another emerald on the trail’s necklace will be Westside Reservoir Park, estimated to open within the next five years on the northwest stretch of the BeltLine. At 300 acres, it will be the city’s largest park. The site—due to its towering granite walls nearly 450 feet high, the remnants of a quarry more than a century old—was used for the filming of the second Hunger Games movie. And like that film’s revolution, the BeltLine and the revitalization of Atlanta that it brings are truly “catching fire.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer opportunities, The New Mexico Volunteers for the Outdoors, Albuquerque, NM

 

The New Mexico Volunteers for the Outdoors is an all-volunteer, non-political organization that is dedicated to improving trails and outdoor facilities throughout the state.

 

The NMVFO is an all-volunteer group so there are lots of ways to volunteer, both on and off the trail. You can help us make outdoors great even if you can’t get to the outdoors!

 

ON THE TRAIL

 

Contact the project leader for a specific project to sign up

 

Project Volunteer: help with the physical aspects of building or improving a trail or public land area. No experience necessary.  All tools provided.

 

Assistant  Project Leader:  Assist the project leader in organizing work crews, gathering tools, gathering project materials. Contact the project leader on a specific project to sign up.

 

Cook or Assistant Cook:  Multi-day or weekend projects require a cook to prepare food for volunteers.  Contact the project leader to sign up.

 

Photographer:  Record the project’s events to be posted on the website, newsletter or used in future promotions.

 

BEHIND THE SCENES – Contact us if you are interested in helping with one of these positions

 

Project Planning Committee: Help with developing our yearly schedule of outdoors projects.

 

Membership Committee: Assist the membership committee in recruiting new volunteers. This may include attending events to promote the NMVFO, distributing brochures, helping with writing for the website, newsletter & local newspaper, placing ads or presenting to other organizations.

 

Tool Team: Trail tools need cleaning, sharpening and organizing! Best suited for an Albuquerque area volunteer.

 

Office management: We need help with collecting mail and other office duties. Best suited for an Albuquerque area volunteer.

 

Website Administrator: Help with updating and maintaining the website.

 

Board Member: Board members make the decisions that direct the NMVFO. Positions are best suited for people in the Albuquerque/Santa Fe/Bernalillo/Belen area, but we do welcome long-distance board members as well.

 

http://nmvfo.org/volunteer

 

2.)  Volunteer opportunities, The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture is a division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, Santa Fe, NM

 

Seasonal or occasional Volunteer needs:

 

Laboratory of Anthropology Library Annual Book Sale Fundraiser:

 

Donations or inquiries to volunteer can be made by calling or e-mailing the Librarian Allison Colborne at (505) 476-1264 or allison.colborne@state.nm.us. To see a listing of the better books LOA Library has for sale throughout the year, please visit the MIAC-LOA Library Abebooks.com Bookstore by searching MIAC-LOA at http://www.abebooks.com/docs/Bookstores/ . Book donations are accepted throughout the year.

 

Native Treasures Indian Arts Festival:

 

Memorial Day Weekend: Help is needed for all days, all shifts and all types of jobs

 

Native Treasures: Indian Arts Festival benefits the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. Each artist generously donates a portion of sales to the Museum’s programs. So you can support your favorite artists and the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture at the same time! www.nativetreasuressantafe.org.

 

Regular Volunteer needs:

 

For more information about any volunteer needs please contact Dawn Kaufmann, Docent Coordinator and Educator, at 505-476-1271.

 

(Please Note: All volunteer areas require some availability during regular office hours M-F 8 am-5 pm, except Special Events and Fundraisers) :

 

Education:

 

The Living Traditions Educational Program provides the opportunity for volunteers and docents to assist in the school tour program through preparation of curriculum and materials for the outreach, and museum tour hands-on activities. Docents are trained to guide students through the museum exhibits, providing unique tours to the youth visitors. Docents and volunteers also work with students in the classroom and outdoors doing hands-on activities, as well as special educational yearly events such as Sun Mountain Gathering and Winter Feast. Volunteers are needed Tuesday through Fridays and occasionally weekends.

 

Contact Joyce Begay-Foss , Director of Education at 505-476-1272 or joyce.begay-foss@state.nm.us

 

Docent Training Program:

 

Docents are an essential and sustaining part of the Museum, and indeed serve as the public face of the Museum for our visitors from around the state and around the world. We rely on our docents to give guided tours, to help with our hands-on classroom activities and outreach visits, and to participate in our fundraising and special events for the public.

 

Please inquire for the next scheduled docent training class. Docent training classes will be led by the docent coordinator, other museum staff, guest artists and speakers, tribal representatives, with panel discussions, and studio tours as well as other fieldtrips. The class will take place at the Museum once a week on Monday mornings from 9 am to 12:30 pm. The training class is about seven months long. Docent training is considered similar in scope and commitment to a college level course. Following successful training as a docent, we ask that you be able to commit to serving two years as a docent. For more information please

 

Contact Dawn Kaufmann, Docent Coordinator and Educator, at 505-476-1271.

 

Museum Gift Shop:

 

The Colleen Cloney Duncan Museum Shop reflects the collections of the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture and is a unique shopping experience. The shop provides visitors with a wide array of contemporary Native arts—ceramics, sculpture, textiles, jewelry, kachina dolls, works on paper, and baskets—along with clothing and an extensive selection of popular and scholarly books on Native cultures.  Volunteers are needed to help with retail sales and general shop needs, volunteer needs include weekends.

 

Contact the Museum Gift  Shop at 505-982-5057.

 

Laboratory of Anthropology Library:

 

The Laboratory of Anthropology maintains an extensive research Library and Archives. The museum has a 25,000 volume non-circulating special research library, computer catalogued and available to the public and researchers in the library or on-line via OCLC. The library specializes in the southwestern American Indian cultures from earliest times to the contemporary. We are looking for people willing to shelve books (knowledge of Dewey Decimal system necessary) as well as repair books and periodicals, check-in journals, indexing projects and assist patrons. We also need volunteers to help organize and run the annual Book Sale Fundraiser held annually. Tasks include sorting donations and pricing books, cash handling, supervising booksale areas. Special projects may include placing leftover donated items on Ebay or other online listing (Amazon.com or Abebooks, etc.), book weeding projects, or updating/cleaning up catalog database.

 

Volunteer hours are available from 8:30 am – 4:30pm Monday – Friday, except during the booksale weekend  when we will need volunteers Saturday and Sunday. Donations or inquiries to volunteer can be made by calling or e-mailing the Librarian Allison Colborne at (505) 476-1264 or allison.colborne@state.nm.us.

 

Finance Office and General Office Assistance:

 

Volunteers are needed for basic help in finance with Xeroxing, data entry, and filing, mailings.

 

Archaeological Research Collections (ARC):

 

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture will be moving its archaeological collections to a new repository at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology in a couple of years, and the Archaeological Research Collections staff is looking for some individuals to lend a hand to prepare for this big move of approximately 10 million objects.

 

Volunteers are needed for various and sundry tasks such as compiling or checking inventories, and re-housing and re-boxing artifacts. These tasks will require attention to detail and a tolerance for repetitive tasks. They may also involve some heavy lifting of boxes of 30-40 lbs, and working in very dusty areas. Volunteers will be part of a team, working during one day per week, in either a morning or afternoon shift (9 am – Noon or 1 to 4 pm). Contact Julia Clifton , Curator of the Archaeological Research Collections at 505-476-1268 or julia.clifton@state.nm.us.

 

Archaeological Records Management Section (ARMS):

 

The Archaeological Records Management Section (ARMS) of the Historic Preservation Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs maintains a statewide repository of archaeological records for purposes of cultural resource management and research. Working in conjunction with numerous state and federal land managing agencies such as the State Land Office, and Bureau of Land Management field offices, access to archaeological records and survey documentation, either in paper or electronic form through the New Mexico Cultural Resource Information System (NMCRIS) is determined by the registrar as mandated by law through the New Mexico Cultural Properties Review Committee (CPRC).

 

Volunteers are essential to the operation of ARMS due to chronic understaffing and the need to deal with massive amounts of new material received on a regular basis. Volunteers should have an interest in the archaeology of New Mexico, willing to process paper records, enjoy detail work, and have clear readable handwriting. A willingness to learn new software applications is a plus.

 

Tasks include:

•filing maps

•housing photographs

•record keeping

•record maintenance

 

Volunteers are preferred Tuesdays, a.m. or p.m. up until 4pm. Other possible days for volunteering are Monday, Thursday, and Friday. For more information please contact: Louanna (Lou) Haecker at 505-476-1280 or louanna.haecker@state.nm.us or drop by ARMS is located at the Laboratory of Anthropology on Museum Hill, Santa Fe.

 

MIAC Native Gardens and the Avanyu Trail

 

Outdoors work with replicas of Historic and Prehistoric structures and native plants

 

http://www.indianartsandculture.org/volunteer

 

Volunteer Ranger Program Opportunities, San Gorgonio Wilderness Association, Mentone, CA

 

Whatever their primary activity, volunteers may be assigned to work  at one of our visitor centers up to four days each summer as needed. There is no enforcement work done by volunteers. Volunteers perform as always friendly hosts to provide information and assistance to visitors and to keep trails and camping areas clean and in good repair.

 

• Naturalist: Give nature walks and/or present programs.

 

•Information Specialist: Staff the Mill Creek, Barton Flats, Big Falls, and Horse Meadows Stations to provide permits, maps, and other information to forest visitors.

 

•Trail Crew: Improve trails throughout the San Bernardino National Forest.

 

•Recreation Maintenance Crew: Improve recreation facilities in the forest.

 

•Forest Patrol: Backpack overnight in the wilderness, ride your horse along trails and dirt roads, or perform day patrols along the upper Santa Ana River to assist visitors, protect the forest, and perform minor trail and camp maintenance.

 

Where:  In and around the San Gorgonio Wilderness and Big Bear Lake areas east of San Bernardino. The San Gorgonio Wilderness is located on the San Bernardino National Forest, approximately 75 miles east of Los Angeles.

http://www.sgwa.org/volun.htm

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Philadelphia Community Conservation Crew Leaders, Student Conservation Association (SCA), Philadelphia, PA and Camden, NJ

 

The Student Conservation Association (SCA), America’s #1 conservation service organization seeks qualified applicants to lead, educate, and inspire youth crews in the Community Crew Program working in Philadelphia, PA and Camden, NJ, over an 8 week period of time in the summer of 2014.

 

Co-lead, mentor and coach a crew of 12 students, ages 15-19, while completing various conservation service projects designed to build an ethic of community and environmental stewardship. Projects include a range of activities such as trail and park maintenance, habitat restoration, revitalization of abandoned urban properties or to urban agriculture.

 

Program Dates: July 1 – August 8, 2014 and a mandatory Training from June 18 – June 27, 2014.

 

Primary Responsibilities:

 

-Follow all SCA policies & procedures as required for the position

-Manage budget and necessary purchasing for crew and project

-Manage relationship with agency partner

-Facilitate crew operations: tools & equipment, work schedule, etc.

-Manage all medical and first aid aspects

-Communicate with full time SCA field staff as required

-Supervise crew members during the work day

-Train & supervise Crew Members in safe and proper tool use

-Organize & lead recreation trip after completion of work project

-Complete required program reporting and documentation

 

Qualifications:

 

-Be at least 21 years old

-Must have ability to legally work in the US

-Valid driver’s license

-Successful completion of criminal background check & MVR check within SCA guidelines

-Must possess current First Aid certification & CPR by the start of the orientation training.

-Documented experience working with urban youth or young adults (ages 14-18)

-Experience as a teacher or leader in an informal or formal educational environment

-Preferred experience with conservation work skills or related skills, i.e. trail maintenance, trail construction, chainsaw, carpentry, landscaping, and gardening.

-Ability to perform manual, physical labor for up to 8 hours per day, exposed to the elements. The employee must occasionally lift and/or move 40 pounds or more.

-Attend Mandatory Leader training June 4 – June 13, 2014.

-Must have personal housing arrangements in Philadelphia, Camden or the surrounding areas.

 

Compensation:

 

$575/week, depending on experience, for up to 8 weeks. Paid Crew Leader Training & Work Skills ($455/week, travel, food & lodging provided)

 

Contact Information:

Please visit the link below to view the full position description including application instructions.

 

http://www.thesca.org/philadelphia-community-conservation-crew-leaders

 

Email leaders@thesca.org with any questions. – See more at: http://www.conbio.org/professional-development/scb-job-board/philadelphia-community-conservation-crew-leaders#sthash.RotUhqZf.dpuf

 

***  From Bill Seiberlich:

 

2.)  Facilities Coordinator, Special Events, National Audubon Society, Inc., Audubon, PA

 

Now in its second century, Audubon is dedicated to protecting birds and other wildlife and the habitat that supports them. Audubon’s mission is engaging people in bird conservation on a hemispheric scale through science, policy, education and on-the-ground conservation action.  By mobilizing and aligning its network of Chapters, Centers, State and Important Bird Area programs in the four major migratory flyways in the Americas, the organization will bring the full power of Audubon to bear on protecting common and threatened bird species and the critical habitat they need to survive.  And as part of BirdLife International, Audubon will join people in over 100 in-country organizations all working to protect a network of Important Bird Areas around the world, leveraging the impact of actions they take at a local level.  What defines Audubon’s unique value is a powerful grassroots network of nearly 500 local chapters, 23 state offices, 43 Audubon Centers, Important Bird Area Programs in 46 states, and 700 staff across the country.  Audubon is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE).

 

Position Summary:

 

Reporting to the Facilities Manager, the Facilities Coordinator will primarily be responsible supporting special events and rentals at the John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove, including cleaning facilities, supervising the activities of rental parties, securing buildings, processing rental contracts, scheduling event staff, and providing other event related support as needed.  S/he will assist with general site maintenance and also help staff the Center’s gift shop during periods when rentals are not scheduled.

 

The Facilities Coordinator will be scheduled work no less than 20 hours per week, and may be scheduled for up to 30, at times, to accommodate event demands. The majority of events and rentals occur during evenings and weekends and scheduled hours will vary depending on the of events booked; however, the Facilities Coordinator should expect to work some part of every weekend. The Center will attempt to honor occasional requests for schedule changes, which are made at least two weeks in advance, in order to accommodate personal/family commitments.

 

Essential Functions:

 

•Act as Audubon’s representative to address guest and vendor needs before, during and after events.

•Clean restrooms, operate industrial floor cleaner, vacuum areas, and thoroughly clean facilities prior to and after events.

•Pick up litter and other debris, including apples and tree nuts, from event areas.

•Conduct inventory, receive and stock event supplies, and report low stock items.

•Assist with and monitor pre-event set-up, including but not limited to setting up tables, chairs, and audio visual equipment.

•Assist with and monitor proper installation and removal of event decorations.

•Oversee day-of events coordination, to include: monitoring noise levels, identifying and minimizing safety hazards, ensuring event users adhere to all rules established by Audubon and Montgomery County.

•Act as a key holder ensuring facilities are both opened and locked at appropriate times, ensure security protocol is strictly adhered to by all parties.

•Initiate and monitor fireplace usage on site; communicate safety instructions to guests.

•Inspect restrooms during events; restock supplies, clean areas, and empty waste baskets as needed.

•Operate the site’s golf cart to shuttle guests and equipment as needed.

•Notify the on-call manager of all major or unusual incidents; notify police, fire or other emergency services as needed.

•Complete nightly reports following events; document major incidents, including all injuries requiring medical attention and/or damage to property, on the Incident Report Form; provide additional information to the Facilities Manager, Director, Risk Manager or others as needed.

•Assist with scheduling, supervising and training other event staff.

•Perform rountine maintenance and janitorial tasks at the site, including but not limited to stocking supplies, weeding/mulching gardens, power washing, raking/blowing, painting, and cleaning.

•Provide staffing support in the gift shop/museum when assigned; process sales and other transactions in the gift shop following established policies and procedures.

•Participate in scheduled staff meetings and trainings.

 

Qualifications and Experience:

 

•Minimum high school diploma or equivalent; additional professional training or degree preferred.

•1-3 years’ experience interacting with facilities coordination or similar field in a fast-paced environment; ability to remain composed under pressure; experience working at a museum, historic site, and other sensitive properties highly desirable.

•Demonstrated ability to safely operate equipment commonly used for janitorial and maintenance tasks, such as ladders, vacuums, and floor cleaners.

•Ability to write and speak fluently in English.

•Valid driver’s license.

•Self-starter with the ability to organize/prioritize workload and complete assignments on time.

•Positive attitude and professional work ethic; prompt and dependable.

•Commitment to the Audubon mission.

•Must be able to engage in physical activity, such as lifting, bending, climbing stairs and ladders, and walking unpaved trails with steep hills, as well as have a willingness to work outdoors on a regular basis in all types of weather conditions.

 

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/2060/job

 

3.)  Marketing Strategy Officer, Marine Mammal Center, Sausalito, California

 

The Marine Mammal Center, an equal opportunity, non-profit employer, is seeking a Marketing Strategy Officer to join our team. The Marine Mammal Center’s mission is to expand knowledge about marine mammals—their health and that of their ocean environment—and to inspire their global conservation. Our core work is the rescue and rehabilitation of sick and injured marine mammals, supported by state-of-the-art animal care and research facilities, a corps of dedicated volunteers, and an engaged community.

 

Job Summary

The Marketing Strategy Officer is a full-time, exempt position with competitive benefits. This management position is responsible for setting and implementing the marketing, branding and communications strategy for the Center. The objectives of this position are to increase visibility and awareness of the Center and as a result increase the potential to raise critical operating funds through the creation and execution of targeted marketing initiatives. The overarching goal is to increase on-site and on-line visitation at the local level, and improve on-line visitation and awareness on the regional, national and global level. This position manages the Center’s two largest fundraising events, the annual Run For The Seals, and the Gala. The position reports to the Director of Development and Marketing but works across divisions in support of integrated programming and initiatives.

 

Reports To

Director of Development and Marketing

 

Responsibilities

 

CORE COMPETENCIES

 

  • Ability to brand and market the Center, its varied programs and events
  • Vast understanding of marketing, branding and communications
  • Excellent project management skills – including the ability to create and implement complex marketing campaigns and meet tight deadlines
  • Excellent strategist with the ability to evaluate programs within all departments and advance the mission of the organization through targeted marketing
  • Ability to produce small to medium-sized fundraising events (30-3,000 people)
  • Ability to multi-task while being very efficient with time
  • Skill and ability with using marketing databases (Convio) and ability to record, manage, report and analyze data
  • Ability to be entrepreneurial – envision and create new programs and utilize mutually agreed decision making tools
  • Ability to take initiative and see projects through to completion with minimal supervision
  • Embodiment of the following leadership attributes sought by the Center for its personnel. These include:
  • An articulate person with creative and strong organizational skills
  • An initiator who functions effectively without being autocratic or political; a team player who is inclusive and flexible, creative, energetic and fair minded
  • A strong interpersonal and communication skill set and demonstrated ability to work effectively with, and gain the respect and support of, varied and changing constituencies including staff, board members, potential donors, volunteers and the like
  • An individual who is equally comfortable to lead and delegate, when appropriate, and who has the sense and humility to dive into and address the most mundane of details, as is warranted by the situation
  • A person who is decisive and resourceful, with the willingness to accept responsibility and take charge of results
  • Imagination, vision, leadership, integrity and an entrepreneurial “can do” attitude.
  • Ability to function well in a balanced culture that combines the richness and relevance of programs with the efficacy of best business practices, fiscal accountability, and institutional impact
  • A self-starter who is confident in expressing opinions, has the foresight to forge ahead when appropriate and alternatively hold back when necessary, employing either tactic with a sensitivity to the feelings and opinions of others
  • An energetic person who is emotionally mature and dependable; a collegial individual
  • Ability to manage contractors and key stakeholders and manage and mentor staff
  • Excellent communication, writing, inter-personal, and presentation skills
  • Ability to work as part of a multidisciplinary, integrated team to advance the mission of the Center

 

MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES

Lead the Marketing and Communications Team (70%)

  • Define, shape and execute the marketing/communications strategy for the Center
  • Ensure that marketing strategies and goals are incorporated into the Center’s visitor programs and on the Center’s website
  • Create strategy and implementation for increased visitation in conjunction with education team and other stakeholders
  • Set annual revenue goals and suggest annual long term revenue goals with input from the Director of Development and Marketing
  • Analyze metrics on a regular basis to determine ongoing progress of online activity
  • Oversee the creation and implementation of marketing content online
  • Work closely with the Direct Response Membership Officer to help manage the relationship with the web strategy consultant; communicate and disseminate data results and trends and utilize data to drive decision-making
  • Manage partnerships with key organizations to promote visitation
  • Manage advertising and agency relationships for the Center
  • Manage public relations consultant, and serve as liaison to appropriate staff
  • Oversee creation of long-lead PR strategy with agency and Event and Marketing Assistant
  • Serve as a center PR spokesperson or delegate to staff
  • Help Story and Communications Curator manage volunteer Social Media Manager (oversee relationship as necessary)
  • Work closely with the Website Specialist and the Direct Response Membership Officer to ensure membership campaigns and all web content is integrated into overall marketing strategy
  • Work closely with the Director of Development and Marketing to strategically create and implement new initiatives for the Center
  • Work closely with Education and Retail departments and other stakeholders to drive visitation and improve visitor experience, and provide advice and tactical ideas to help retail sales

Personnel Management (20%)

  • Manage the Event & Marketing Assistant, Story and Communications Curator, and volunteer Social Media Manager and set goals and metrics for each position
  • Measure success through assessment of duties on a routine basis

Major Event Management (10%)
Direct the annual Run for the Seals event:

  • Set gross and net revenue goals for the event
  • Manage and oversee the creation and implementation of all event logistics, budgeting and marketing elements i.e. event plans, staffing briefs, timelines, expense and revenue budgets, marketing plans, fundraising tactics etc.
  • Work with other departments, contractors and volunteers to ensure event success
  • Manage and work closely with Direct Response Membership Officer and other key staff to implement a sponsorship plan
  • Manage live event

Manage the gala:

  • Set gross and net revenue goals for the event
  • Devise a theme that threads through the entire event and all marketing
  • Create and implement a marketing plan and collateral tied to the theme
  • Serve as staff point person to the venue, AV, caterer and other logistics suppliers
  • Utilize other departmental staff as production back-up
  • Hire external events person if needed

 

Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s degree
  • 7+ years marketing/advertising/branding experience
  • Communications/PR experience a plus
  • Demonstrated experience with implementing a marketing plan
  • Ability to optimize automated systems; Proficient in Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc.), and experience with relational databases.
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills

Compensation

DOE and excellent benefit package

How to Apply

TO APPLY
Please send a cover letter and resume attention Human Resources Director & I.T. Manager to admin@tmmc.org. Please put “Marketing Strategy Officer” in the subject line. Deadline for applications is March 28, 2014. We hope to hire this position as soon as possible. Please no phone calls or faxed submissions.

Marine Mammal Center

(http://www.marinemammalcenter.org)

http://philanthropynewsdigest.org/jobs/8336-marketing-strategy-officer

 

From Bridget Serchak:

 

4.)  The Manager, Federal Relations, National fish and wildlife foundation, Washington, DC

http://www.nfwf.org/whoweare/careers/Pages/manager-great.aspx

 

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