Your Very Next Step newsletter for October 2014

Your Very Next Step newsletter for October 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com
“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.”

– L.M. Montgomery

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu
This edition of “Your very next step” comes to you from Nassau, Bahamas.

 

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.
***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:
***  Ned’s upcoming travel

***  “The Most Epic Safety Video Every Made.”

***  Carolina Mountain Club Hike Leader Guidelines

***  Kalaeloa Airport

***  Flight Delays Are Mostly Airlines’ Faults? Yes, Says a Pilot

***  Why TSA Is Letting More People Into the Line Where They Can Keep on Their Shoes, Belt

***  The Seven Most Annoying Myths About Flying

***  The Smart Floors Making Airports More Accessible for Disabled Travelers

***  The “America the Beautiful” Volunteer Pass

***  Rail Trail of the Month: October 2014 – New Jersey’s Columbia Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Adopt a Trail or Shelter, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

2.)  Bark Mulch Packers, Backcountry Composting Sites, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

3.) Interpretive Volunteers, Santa Clara County, Open Space Authority, San Jose, CA

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Park Ranger – Part-time, City of Round Rock, Round Rock, Texas

2.)  Press Secretary, Conservation Law Foundation, Boston, MA

3.)  Park & Recreation Ranger, Sterling State Park, State of Michigan, Monroe, MI

4.)  PARK NATURALISTS, LONG KEY STATE PARK; MONROE COUNTY, State of Florida, Long Key, FL

5.)  Park Ranger I (2 openings), City of Austin, Austin, TX

6.)  Park Ranger I, City of Hollywood, Hollywood, FL

7.)  Parks Manager – Recreations and Aquatics, City of Hollywood, Hollywood, FL

8.)  Natural Resources Specialist (Ranger) (Recent Graduate), Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Copan, OK

9.)  Natural Resources Specialist (Park Ranger), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Peck, MT

10.)  Conservation Officer, Department of Natural Resources, Lansing, Michigan

11.)  Park Ranger, LEGOLAND, Carlsbad, CA

13.)  Open Space Operations Superintendent, City of Aurora, Aurora, CO

14.)  Residential Outdoor Science Instructor, Full Time – Seasonal Position March-November 2015,

Sierra Nevada Journeys’ Grizzly Creek Ranch Campus, Portola, California

15.)  Recreation Manager, Fairmont Orchid, Kohala Coast, HI

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!
*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel, maybe, perhaps:

 

October 27-28, Norfolk, VA

 

October 29-30, Nassau, Bahamas

 

November 24-27, Doha, Qatar

 

December 8-10, Aubu Dhabi, UAE

 

January 27-30    Genoa, Italy

 

***  “The Most Epic Safety Video Every Made.”

 

And Elijah Wood, doesn’t even look stricken…

 

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2014/10/22/16454/562/travel/Buckle+Up+with+Elijah+Wood+in+%27The+Most+Epic+Safety+Video+Ever+Made%27

 

***  Carolina Mountain Club Hike Leader Guidelines

 

(Ned notes:  Normally I’d post this with the volunteer opportunities, but it has some very interesting information and valuable advice for everyone who go forth into the great outdoors, especially with groups.)

 

CMC leads well over 200 hikes per year. This requires many hike leaders. Each needs some hiking experience and leadership training, and needs to commit to leading at least one hike per year.

 

Leading a hike takes a little more time than just hiking, because the hike needs to be scouted ahead of time, and there is some preparation and paperwork required. But leading a hike can be fun, and is a great way to really learn the trails you lead hikes on, and the routes to the trails. You can find your own strengths and build on them as you develop your own style and hike preferences as a leader.

 

Become a Leader with the Carolina Mountain ClubHiking is a healthful, social and pleasant activity, and hikers enjoy meeting and conversing with their fellow hikers.  Hike leaders will enjoy the opportunity to interact with the other hikers and to lead an activity where everyone is up-beat, friendly and enjoying their day in the woods.  These guidelines will help the hike leader to make the hike a successful experience for all.

 

Preparing Hike Description

 

  1. A hike description must be prepared for Let’s Go. This description will usually be prepared by the hike scheduler, with the assistance of the hike leader. Information sources are the hike database, previous hike sign-up sheets, the hike leader, and/or the hike scheduler. The hike description will include:

 

Text describing hike

Hike length

Cumulative hike ascent

GPS information, if available

Type of hike (in & out, loop, car shuttle or key swap)

Driving distance

A requirement for reservations if the number of hikers is to be limited (NOTE: Wilderness areas are limited to 10 hikers);

Starting time and meeting place.  NOTE:  CMC guidelines require hikes to end one hour before sunset (all-day hikes) or 30 minutes before sunset (half-day hikes)

List second meeting place and meeting time, if to be used

  1. The Hike scheduler will prepare the text and send it to the hike Leader for proof-reading and approval.

 

Month Before the Hike

 

  1. Scout the hike, preferably within one month of the hike, to verify:

 

Trail accessibility and condition

Adequate parking at trailhead

A desirable lunch or snack stop

Points of interest along the trail

Hiking time

  1. If the scout results in changes to the hike or if the leader wants to communicate additional information about the hike, the leader can post the information as a scout report. This will be put in the hiking schedule on the website. This could also be an opportunity to promote the hike with more text than Let’s Go descriptions allow.  A picture could be included as well.

 

  1. Obtain permission to park and/or hike across private property, if required;

 

  1. Answer phone calls and e-mails concerning questions about the hike;

 

  1. Make a reservation list for any hike with an attendance limit.

 

  1. Although not a requirement, preparation of a hike map for distribution to hikers (especially for complicated routes) is always appreciated by the hikers.

 

Day of Hike (before hike)

 

As a Hike Leader you have obligations to your Hikers1. As hike leader, you have the right and obligation to:

 

Limit the number of hikers, if necessary;

Exclude those who, in the opinion of the leader, are not physically capable or experienced, or not properly clothed and equipped for the  hike.  Especially take note of footwear on new hikers;

Change the hike from the printed description if trail conditions have changed, particularly if hiker safety will be jeopardized.  Avoid changing the difficulty of the hike significantly.  If the hike has changed, be very clear, at the meeting places, what the changes are.

  1. Assume full charge and responsibility for the trip. Appoint a sweep who is a strong hiker and who will accept responsibility for checking the hiker count and assuring that no one is lost.

 

  1. Take a simple first aid kit. Both the leader and sweep should carry whistles for communication.  Optionally, a cell phone can also be taken, although reception is sometimes poor in the mountains.  For cold weather hiking, carry extra food rations, a space blanket, light source and matches.

 

  1. Meet the hikers at the primary meeting place, or appoint someone to represent you. If the hike is canceled, the leader or representative must still go to all meeting places to inform hikers of the cancelation (unless driving conditions are hazardous).

 

  1. At the meeting places ask: a) Is anyone allergic to anything, particularly bee stings?; b) Does anyone have a health or medical condition that could be influenced by this hike?; c) Are there any conditions that could cause the hiker to slow down significantly?; d) Does everyone have any medications that they could possibly need on the hike? e) When was the last time that you went on a x mile hike? (and follow up with questions to determine fitness).

 

  1. Have all hikers sign the sign-in sheet, and do a head-count – Hike Sign-up Sheet

 

  1. Hike leaders should remember that hikes are social occasions and should take an opportunity at the beginning for everyone to introduce themselves if new hikers are present. Hikers new to the group should be educated as to proper hike etiquette and each hiker’s responsibility to the group (being mindful of the hiker behind as well as the one in front).

 

  1. Arrange car pooling and verify that everyone has a ride.

 

  1. Before leaving, explain the driving route to each driver and count the number of cars. For complicated routes, it is helpful to prepare a map for drivers.

 

  1. When driving to the trailhead, drive at a speed that enables the following cars to keep up. When making a turn, assure that all cars have made the turn.

 

Day of Hike (during hike)

 

  1. The hiking pace should be controlled by the leader to keep all hikers within reasonable distance behind the leader. Occasionally, check that the sweep is visible to assure that the group stays together.

 

  1. Hikers must not go ahead of the leader or behind the sweep except by specific permission of the leader/sweep.

 

  1. The hike leader should stop at prudent intervals for:

 

Trail breaks

Rest and water stops

“Catch-up” stops to assure that slower hikers catch up with the rest of the hike, and to allow them resting time if needed (NOTE:  Beginning hikers especially get frustrated by a leader who hikes way ahead, then waits for everyone to catch up, and then starts hiking as soon as the last hiker shows up, without allowing the last hiker to rest)

Snack and lunch stops

  1. The hike leader must stop at all trail intersections, junctions or any place where there might be confusion, and assure that all hikers see the correct direction of travel. This usually requires that the leader wait until the sweep is visible.

 

  1. If the time needed to complete the hike would be later than the minimum “ending-time-before-sunset” time, the hike leader must stop the hike and return to the trailhead.

 

Day of Hike (End of Hike)

 

  1. The leader should give non-members a CMC application form and encourage them to join the club.

 

  1. Encourage a photographer to email a picture to the leader if the leader has not made one himself.

 

  1. If there is no map and GPS track of the hike on the website, encourage a hiker with a GPS to send the track to the Hiking Webmaster.

 

  1. The leader must not leave the trailhead until all hikers are present and all car engines have been started.

 

5 .If necessary (use personal judgment), lead the other drivers back to familiar roads.

 

After the Hike

 

  1. Prepare a short description of the hike and post the report on the website.

 

  1. Fill in the requested data on the back of the CMC Sign-in Sheet and mail it to the hike scheduler at the address listed. Your information and suggestions will be very helpful for the next time the same hike is scheduled.

 

Conclusion

 

Welcome to Carolina Mountain Club!Carolina Mountain Club thanks you for leading a hike for the club.

 

We hope you have enjoyed the experience and that you would like to lead another hike for us in the future!

 

http://www.carolinamountainclub.org/index.cfm/do/index.cfm/do/pages.view/id/107/page/Hike-Leader-Guidelines

 

***  Kalaeloa Airport :

 

Kalaeloa Airport (JRF), also called John Rodgers Field (the original name of Honolulu International Airport) and formerly was the Naval Air Station Barbers Point.  Kalaeloa is located between Honolulu and the western O’ahu communities of Ewa Beach, Kapolei, and Campbell Industrial Park.  Mokulele Airilines is pleased to announce that they will be the first-ever scheduled airline to provide service between Kalaeloa and Kahului, Maui on July 1st, 2014.

 

Kalaeloa, will provide hassle free commuting between O’ahu and the rest of the Hawaiian Islands.  This includes:  avoiding heavy traffic on the H1, no TSA screening, and free parking with a valid permit.  Kalaeloa will also provide an easier access to the Aulani Disney Resort & Spa on  the southwestern coast of O’ahu.

 

http://www.mokuleleairlines.com/kalaeloa-oahu.php

 

***  Flight Delays Are Mostly Airlines’ Faults? Yes, Says a Pilot

By Justin Bachman August 26, 2014

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-08-26/pilot-flight-delays-are-airlines-fault

 

***  Why TSA Is Letting More People Into the Line Where They Can Keep on Their Shoes, Belt

By Liz Klimas

 

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/09/08/security-issue-why-are-more-people-being-funneled-through-tsas-precheck-line-that-havent-gone-through-the-application-process/

 

***  The Seven Most Annoying Myths About Flying

http://www.askthepilot.com/seven-myths/

 

***  From Bernie Wagenblast’s TCN newsletter

 

The Smart Floors Making Airports More Accessible for Disabled Travelers

Link to article on Skift:

http://skift.com/2014/10/23/the-smart-floors-making-airports-more-accessible-for-disabled-travelers

 

 

***  The “America the Beautiful” Volunteer Pass

 

Volunteering for the Public Lands Just Got More Rewarding!

 

What are the benefits of the pass?

The pass covers entrance and/or standard amenity fees on lands managed by the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and Bureau of Reclamation, and the Department of Agriculture’s USDA Forest Service. Passes are valid for one year from the issuance date.

 

How can I qualify for a Volunteer Pass?

Accrue just 250 hours of volunteer service on participating Federal public lands, and you can receive the new Volunteer Pass in recognition of your efforts. Simply coordinate tracking of your hours with your volunteer supervisor or volunteer coordinator. For information on the “American the Beautiful” Federal Recreational Lands Pass Program, please contact your state volunteer coordinator.

 

Click here to locate your state coordinator: http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/res/Volunteer/contacts.html.

 

Download the America the Beautiful interagency pass program brochure: http://www.blm.gov/style/medialib/blm/wo/Law_Enforcement/nlcs/education__interpretation/volunteers.Par.21468.File.dat/America_Beautiful_Pass_Brochure.pdf.

 

***  Rail Trail of the Month: October 2014
New Jersey’s Columbia Trail

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Adopt a Trail or Shelter, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

 

Help enhance the hiking experience for everyone by becoming a Long Trail adopter.  We can help you get started on basic maintenance of a trail or shelter.  Whether you want to volunteer on your own, with your family, or with your outing group, maintaining the Long Trail is a great way to give a little back to the Green Mountains.  For a current listing of available trails and shelters click here or contact Thorin Markison at tmarkinson@greenmountainclub.org.

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/page.php?id=388

 

2.)  Bark Mulch Packers, Backcountry Composting Sites, Long Trail System, Green Mountain Club, Vermont

 

Mulch Packers carry 40-50 lb. bags of bark mulch into backcountry shelters over rugged terrain for use at composting privy sites. This is an excellent opportunity to prepare for backpacking trips and scheduling is flexible to meet your needs.

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/images/File/Shawn_Flanigan/Bark_Mulch_Packer_01_03_2008.pdf

http://www.greenmountainclub.org/page.php?id=9

 

3.) Interpretive Volunteers, Santa Clara County, Open Space Authority, San Jose, CA

 

Interpretation is about providing an enjoyable nature experience and a positive memory. A comfortable and fun environment encourages people to make connections between their lives and the natural world. Visitors learn through conversations, activities, stories, and close observation of their surroundings. The goal is to leave them with a sense of nature’s value and significance rather than filling them up with facts.

 

The OSA program explores a wide range of topics related to the open space areas of Santa Clara County. Hikes and activities are designed to appeal to people of different ages, backgrounds and levels of outdoor experience.

 

Volunteers have the opportunity to serve as interpretive docents or aides and lead or help with hikes, activities and outreach events.

 

Interpretive Aides

 

Helping at events, day camps, hikes and other OSA activities can be a one-time volunteer job or an ongoing commitment. Aides will have the chance to receive training in the materials and activities used to engage the interest and curiosity of young visitors.

 

Docents

 

Interpretive training photoInterpretive training

Being a docent is a chance to share your personal interest in nature or the cultural history of the south bay area and have a good time doing it. Docents can learn how to present OSA programs on topics such as early Ohlone Indians or mountain lions. And they can work under the direction of the Interpreter to develop an appropriate nature program on a favorite subject of their own. All docents need is an interest in the outdoors and a desire to help others learn.

 

Besides learning about the different subjects relevant to open space preservation, docents will receive training in such interpretive skills as how to work with groups, create interesting programs and use hands-on materials. Docents-in-training will also have the opportunity to partner with experienced docents and interpreters in front of “live” audiences in order to polish their skills.

 

For more information, call Interpreter Teri Rogoway at 408-224-7476 or send an email to trogoway@openspaceauthority.org.

http://www.openspaceauthority.org/volunteer/interpretivevolunteers.html

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:
1.)  Park Ranger – Part-time, City of Round Rock, Round Rock, Texas

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/roundrock/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=980883

 

***  From Carol Gregory:

 

2.)  Press Secretary, Conservation Law Foundation, Boston, MA

 

Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) seeks a proactive and strategic Press Secretary with advocacy, political and/or campaign experience to oversee the nonprofit environmental organization’s day-to-day external communications and media outreach. The Press Secretary must have strong relationships with national and New England news decision makers, a proven track record for generating media coverage, excellent writing skills, expertise in leveraging digital platforms to increase visibility, and the ability to turn complex topics into messages that resonate with diverse audiences. The Press Secretary is a member of the Communications and Marketing Department, and reports to the Vice President of Communications and Marketing.

 

To Apply

Send your resume titled “your last name-first initial-resume” (e.g., “SMITH J RESUME”) and a detailed cover letter titled “your last name-first initial-cover” (e.g., “SMITH J COVER”) to careers@clf.org.  Please make “Press Secretary” the subject of your e-mail. The position will remain open until filled. Absolutely no phone calls or in-person visits please.

For a full description visit here:

http://www.clf.org/about-clf/employment-opportunities/#presssecretary

 

3.)  Park & Recreation Ranger, Sterling State Park, State of Michigan, Monroe, MI

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/michigan/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=978228

 

4.)  PARK NATURALISTS, LONG KEY STATE PARK; MONROE COUNTY, State of Florida, Long Key, FL

http://jobs.myflorida.com/viewjob.html?optlink-view=view-755012

 

5.)  Park Ranger I (2 openings), City of Austin, Austin, TX

https://www.austincityjobs.org/postings/45593

 

6.)  Park Ranger I, City of Hollywood, Hollywood, FL

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/hollywoodfl/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=981926

 

7.)  Parks Manager – Recreations and Aquatics, City of Hollywood, Hollywood, FL

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/hollywoodfl/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=981934

 

8.)  Natural Resources Specialist (Ranger) (Recent Graduate), Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Copan, OK

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/383084500

 

9.)  Natural Resources Specialist (Park Ranger), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Peck, MT

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/383464400

 

10.)  Conservation Officer, Department of Natural Resources, Lansing, Michigan

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/michigan/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=600429

 

11.)  Park Ranger, LEGOLAND, Carlsbad, CA

www.bit.ly/1qKzKUl

 

13.)  Open Space Operations Superintendent, City of Aurora, Aurora, CO

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/aurora/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=980239

 

14.)  Residential Outdoor Science Instructor, Full Time – Seasonal Position March-November 2015,

Sierra Nevada Journeys’ Grizzly Creek Ranch Campus, Portola, California

http://sierranevadajourneys.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Residential-Outdoor-Science-Instructor-2015.pdf

 

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

15.)  Recreation Manager, Fairmont Orchid, Kohala Coast, HI

http://bit.ly/1pHU0GO

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

*** Your Very Next Step is a service of the Job of the Week Network LLC
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Editor and Publisher
Your Very Next Step
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